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Splash Mountain

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BUSINESS
January 21, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI
Disneyland's newest thrill ride, Splash Mountain, has more than lived up to its pre-opening billing as the theme park's wettest ride. It's too wet, Disney officials said Friday. So the opening of Splash Mountain, already delayed from Jan. 12 to mid-February, will be delayed to sometime during the summer, park spokesman Bob Roth said.
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NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
Knott's Berry Farm has restored a theme park attraction considered groundbreaking in its time to a technological level its legendary creator could have only imagined when the ride was conceived more than four decades ago. Photos: Timber Mountain log ride at Knott's Berry Farm The 1969 Timber Mountain log ride , still the most popular attraction at the Buena Park theme park, reopened Friday after a multimillion-dollar renovation that...
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1989 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Sojourners on Disneyland's latest multimillion-dollar attraction, Splash Mountain, will find no mysteriously elusive Mr. Kurtz awaiting at the end of the watery twists and turns, forcing them to peel back the thin skin that is civilization. Nevertheless, the ride--based on Disney's 1946 film "Song of the South," which itself was drawn from the folk parables of Uncle Remus--also contains just a hint of Joseph Conrad. It's a journey into the heart of dampness.
TRAVEL
April 28, 2009 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Call it an unexpected consequence of the bad economy: A recent round of staff reductions at Disneyland could result in the return of embarrassing episodes of public nudity at the Happiest Place on Earth. Way back in 1997, a front-page story in the Los Angeles Times chronicled a scintillating Internet phenomenon involving the Anaheim theme park's Splash Mountain log ride: Photos of women flashing their breasts at an automatic camera that snapped souvenir photographs during the final 50-foot drop were "unzip-a-dee-doo-dahing" their way around cyberspace, earning the ride the dubious nickname "Flash Mountain.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Welcome to Sunday in the Parks with Calendar--the Sequel. And please fasten your seat belts. For our second annual survey of Southern California's major theme parks, our intrepid reporters visited the parks on a recent Sunday, unannounced. Accompanied by family or a friend, they bought tickets, stood in lines, sampled the park's rides and menus and withered in the heat. Afterward, they put in calls to the various park publicists for assistance in compiling our comparison chart.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | Mary Ann Galante, Times staff writer
Disneyland has scheduled an "official opening dedication" on July 17 for Splash Mountain, the park's new, multimillion-dollar flume ride. The date marks the Anaheim amusement park's 34th birthday. But when the ride will open to the public remains as mysterious as the Haunted Mansion. "It may or may not be before" July 17, park spokesman Bob Roth said. "We're still working on it." Roth explained that the date the ride actually opens "depends on how things go here the next few days in testing the ride."
BUSINESS
December 1, 1988 | Mary Ann Galante, Times staff writer
Sometimes even the best-laid plans go awry. The grand opening of Disneyland's Splash Mountain, the flume ride featuring characters from Disney's "Song of the South" movie, has been delayed a month and is slated for mid-February. Technical problems were blamed for delaying the first big splash of the ride, which Disneyland says combines the adventures of "Pirates of the Caribbean" with the thrills of "Space Mountain."
BUSINESS
November 14, 1990 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Smile! Come this spring, you could be on the Disney camera. Disneyland officials plan to install a special video camera on Splash Mountain to take photographs of the riders just as they begin the scary, high-speed plummet down the flume. The pictures will then to offered to the riders--for a price. The idea came from Walt Disney Co. Chairman Michael Eisner, who was impressed with press photographs of himself riding Splash Mountain when the attraction debuted in July, 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY and MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 19-year-old Nevada woman apparently suffered heart failure late Thursday while riding Disneyland's high-thrill Splash Mountain--featuring a five-story plunge--and died shortly afterward, officials said. The county coroner's office said Saturday it appears the woman, Jessica Erickson of Fernley, Nev., had a heart condition and died of natural causes. Like several other high-speed rides such as Big Thunder and Space Mountain, Disneyland alerts guests to their possible hazards before boarding.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1988 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
Disneyland's customers aren't the only ones who have to wait in line. The Magic Kingdom's newest attraction, Splash Mountain, had to wait years before it made its way into the park. But today, construction of the multimillion-dollar ride is well under way in Bear Country at the Magic Kingdom. Based on characters from Disney's 1946 film, "Song of the South," Splash Mountain will be the world's longest flume ride when it opens in January.
SPORTS
January 15, 2005
I don't see what the big fuss is about the Angels changing their name from Anaheim to Los Angeles. All we have to do is change a few words here and there, and no one will know the difference. "I Love L.A." (sung to the tune "I Love L.A." by Randy Newman) Rollin' past Cypress College With rich Arte Moreno at my side Santa Ana Freeway's flowin' down from the north And we were born to ride. McCourt's no problem, he has no dough Lower beer prices, baby And let those cold suds flow.
NEWS
April 10, 2003 | Robert Niles, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time, Disneyland built innovative, exciting attractions that helped make it the world's most popular and beloved theme park. Today, many of its former designers are out of work, laid off from Disney's kingdom. Some did go on to design other companies' parks, such as Universal's spectacular Islands of Adventure in Orlando, Fla. Those who remain work with meager budgets, turning out retreads of previous designs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Walt Disney Co. has settled a suit filed by a woman who said she suffered back injuries on Disneyland's Splash Mountain ride. The suit alleged that on Aug. 8, 2000, an operator started the ride before Yvonne Traina, 67, was strapped in, throwing her rapidly backward. She screamed and the ride was stopped, throwing her forward, the suit said. The suit, filed in May 2001, was settled Monday just before trial was to have started in Los Angeles Superior Court.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1999 | E. Scott Reckard
In an innovation tested successfully at Walt Disney Co.'s Florida parks, visitors to Disneyland will be offered a choice of when they want to ride some of the Anaheim theme park's most sought-after attractions. They can wait in the regular lines, or visit a kiosk to obtain a boarding pass for a set time later in the day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997 | ROBERT A. JONES
We are headed to get dirt. A man and a boy bouncing down the road in a pickup. The birds are singing, the crocuses blooming. High spring in L.A., a day so perfect and timeless you'd think it was 1954. "Gun it," says Casey. Do all 6-year-olds love speed? Maybe. I consider giving him a lecture on safe driving and then think the hell with that. I gun it. Casey puts his head against the seat and we are flying toward the deep Valley where a man waits with a skip loader and a mountain of topsoil.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While critics have worked themselves into a lather denouncing Disneyland's cleanup of lusty swashbucklers on its Pirates of the Caribbean attraction, it appears that a park insider has pulled off the ultimate in politically incorrect pranks. More than a dozen photographs of women baring their breasts on the park's Splash Mountain log ride have appeared on sites across the Internet in recent months--leading some cheeky cyber-fans to christen the attraction "Flash Mountain."
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While critics have worked themselves into a lather denouncing Disneyland's cleanup of lusty swashbucklers on its Pirates of the Caribbean attraction, it appears that a park insider has pulled off the ultimate in politically incorrect pranks. More than a dozen photographs of women baring their breasts on the park's Splash Mountain log ride have appeared on sites across the Internet in recent months--leading some cheeky cyber-fans to christen the attraction "Flash Mountain."
TRAVEL
April 28, 2009 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Call it an unexpected consequence of the bad economy: A recent round of staff reductions at Disneyland could result in the return of embarrassing episodes of public nudity at the Happiest Place on Earth. Way back in 1997, a front-page story in the Los Angeles Times chronicled a scintillating Internet phenomenon involving the Anaheim theme park's Splash Mountain log ride: Photos of women flashing their breasts at an automatic camera that snapped souvenir photographs during the final 50-foot drop were "unzip-a-dee-doo-dahing" their way around cyberspace, earning the ride the dubious nickname "Flash Mountain.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | Jerry Crowe, Jerry Crowe is a Times staff writer.
Six Flags Magic Mountain-- which has been on a thrill-ride building spree in recent years, adding an attraction a year to the park since 1989--has gone a step further this year. It has built a whole new park. Six Flags Hurricane Harbor, a themed water park that company officials said cost about $35 million, will open next door to Magic Mountain in Valencia on June 16. The entrances to the two parks, which will charge separate admissions, are about 20 feet apart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY and MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 19-year-old Nevada woman apparently suffered heart failure late Thursday while riding Disneyland's high-thrill Splash Mountain--featuring a five-story plunge--and died shortly afterward, officials said. The county coroner's office said Saturday it appears the woman, Jessica Erickson of Fernley, Nev., had a heart condition and died of natural causes. Like several other high-speed rides such as Big Thunder and Space Mountain, Disneyland alerts guests to their possible hazards before boarding.
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