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Split Finger Fastball

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SPORTS
April 4, 1986 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
On a pleasant evening in Richmond, Va., four seasons ago, Donnie Moore became a believer. It didn't take much. After all, he was back in the minor leagues, which is nice if you like Springfield, Wichita, Midland and such. Moore had seen them all and then some. Now he was in Richmond, home of the Atlanta Braves' Triple-A team--and he was struggling. Moore needed an off-speed pitch. Had to have it.
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SPORTS
June 18, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
Juan Uribe was dark-haired Thursday, blond Friday and bald Saturday. The inconsistency of Uribe's appearance has been a source of some light-hearted humor in the Dodgers' dugout. His inconsistent presence in the lineup? Not so funny. The Dodgers' $21-million off-season acquisition went into Saturday's game with a .215 average, something Manager Don Mattingly said he blamed on a couple of injuries Uribe suffered. Always considered a streaky hitter, Uribe started to gain momentum in mid-April, when he batted .435 with two home runs over a six-game stretch.
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SPORTS
July 28, 1987 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, Times Staff Writer
Let it be recorded that on July 27, 1987, Timothy Stanley Crews, a right-handed pitcher who had spent 6 1/2 years in the minors, made his major league debut for the Dodgers. He pitched fairly well in 1 innings, allowing one run and two hits while striking out two. Those are the facts from Monday night's game at Dodger Stadium.
SPORTS
February 22, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
It's not that Ervin Santana needs another pitch. He did just fine with a fastball, breaking ball and changeup last season, finishing 17-10 with a 3.92 earned-run average and 169 strikeouts in 33 starts. But the 28-year-old right-hander began experimenting with a split-fingered fastball in September and is gaining enough confidence in it that he plans to take it into the season. "Why not?" Santana said. "It's there. My fingers are long enough to throw it. Every year, you do something different.
SPORTS
June 18, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
Juan Uribe was dark-haired Thursday, blond Friday and bald Saturday. The inconsistency of Uribe's appearance has been a source of some light-hearted humor in the Dodgers' dugout. His inconsistent presence in the lineup? Not so funny. The Dodgers' $21-million off-season acquisition went into Saturday's game with a .215 average, something Manager Don Mattingly said he blamed on a couple of injuries Uribe suffered. Always considered a streaky hitter, Uribe started to gain momentum in mid-April, when he batted .435 with two home runs over a six-game stretch.
SPORTS
May 20, 1989 | TOM VERDUCCI, Newsday
Ron Perranoski is a mechanic who tinkers with pitchers. He is the pitching coach of the Los Angeles Dodgers, and he has developed a knack for spotting trouble under a pitcher's hood. Take the cases of Tim Leary, Tim Belcher and Mike Morgan, pitchers who always had great arms but never won until they pulled into Perranoski's shop. The Dodgers deserve credit for taking chances on them. Perranoski deserves credit for working with them. Those three pitchers, passed over by a total of nine teams, now compose three-fifths of the formidable Los Angeles rotation.
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | IRENE GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
There's a pitcher with a mean split-finger fastball on the Loyola Marymount baseball team who brings much-needed relief to the defending West Regional champion Lions--not to mention Coach Dave Snow. His name is Darryl Scott, a 6-1, 180-pound freshman recruited out of Yuba City High in Northern California, and he's Loyola's head man on the mound. "He was so dominating and poised that he was able to throw every other day," said Assistant Coach Donny Perry. "He's very, very strong."
SPORTS
March 9, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Millionaire relief pitcher Bruce Sutter, now with the Atlanta Braves, has made the split-fingered fastball famous, but he may have company this season. Eric Show of the Padres has been toying with the split-fingered fastball since the third day of spring training. He's learning the pitch from Jack Lamabe, the Padres' Double-A pitching coach. "We were fooling around with the pitch, and it moved right off the bat when I threw it," Show said. "I took to it real quick.
SPORTS
June 1, 1989 | CHRIS FOSTER, Times Staff Writer
Andy Croghan looks back over his brief baseball career and wonders . . . how? How does a guy who decided he no longer wanted to play baseball when he was a freshman in high school get to pitch in the College World Series? How does a guy who had no scholarship offers a year ago get to pitch in college in the first place? How does a guy who has never won a postseason game in his life win two of the most important games in Cal State Long Beach baseball history? How, indeed.
SPORTS
January 11, 2006 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
Bruce Sutter, a pure reliever who revolutionized the split-fingered fastball over a 13-year career in which he saved 300 games, was elected Tuesday to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Sutter, who turned 53 on Sunday, was named on 76.9% of ballots cast by members of the Baseball Writers' Assn. of America. Needing 390 votes to reach the requisite 75%, Sutter, in his 13th year of eligibility, received 400, 56 more than last year.
SPORTS
January 11, 2006 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
Bruce Sutter, a pure reliever who revolutionized the split-fingered fastball over a 13-year career in which he saved 300 games, was elected Tuesday to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Sutter, who turned 53 on Sunday, was named on 76.9% of ballots cast by members of the Baseball Writers' Assn. of America. Needing 390 votes to reach the requisite 75%, Sutter, in his 13th year of eligibility, received 400, 56 more than last year.
SPORTS
June 1, 1989 | CHRIS FOSTER, Times Staff Writer
Andy Croghan looks back over his brief baseball career and wonders . . . how? How does a guy who decided he no longer wanted to play baseball when he was a freshman in high school get to pitch in the College World Series? How does a guy who had no scholarship offers a year ago get to pitch in college in the first place? How does a guy who has never won a postseason game in his life win two of the most important games in Cal State Long Beach baseball history? How, indeed.
SPORTS
May 20, 1989 | TOM VERDUCCI, Newsday
Ron Perranoski is a mechanic who tinkers with pitchers. He is the pitching coach of the Los Angeles Dodgers, and he has developed a knack for spotting trouble under a pitcher's hood. Take the cases of Tim Leary, Tim Belcher and Mike Morgan, pitchers who always had great arms but never won until they pulled into Perranoski's shop. The Dodgers deserve credit for taking chances on them. Perranoski deserves credit for working with them. Those three pitchers, passed over by a total of nine teams, now compose three-fifths of the formidable Los Angeles rotation.
SPORTS
July 28, 1987 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, Times Staff Writer
Let it be recorded that on July 27, 1987, Timothy Stanley Crews, a right-handed pitcher who had spent 6 1/2 years in the minors, made his major league debut for the Dodgers. He pitched fairly well in 1 innings, allowing one run and two hits while striking out two. Those are the facts from Monday night's game at Dodger Stadium.
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | IRENE GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
There's a pitcher with a mean split-finger fastball on the Loyola Marymount baseball team who brings much-needed relief to the defending West Regional champion Lions--not to mention Coach Dave Snow. His name is Darryl Scott, a 6-1, 180-pound freshman recruited out of Yuba City High in Northern California, and he's Loyola's head man on the mound. "He was so dominating and poised that he was able to throw every other day," said Assistant Coach Donny Perry. "He's very, very strong."
SPORTS
April 4, 1986 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
On a pleasant evening in Richmond, Va., four seasons ago, Donnie Moore became a believer. It didn't take much. After all, he was back in the minor leagues, which is nice if you like Springfield, Wichita, Midland and such. Moore had seen them all and then some. Now he was in Richmond, home of the Atlanta Braves' Triple-A team--and he was struggling. Moore needed an off-speed pitch. Had to have it.
SPORTS
February 22, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
It's not that Ervin Santana needs another pitch. He did just fine with a fastball, breaking ball and changeup last season, finishing 17-10 with a 3.92 earned-run average and 169 strikeouts in 33 starts. But the 28-year-old right-hander began experimenting with a split-fingered fastball in September and is gaining enough confidence in it that he plans to take it into the season. "Why not?" Santana said. "It's there. My fingers are long enough to throw it. Every year, you do something different.
SPORTS
April 17, 1991 | BILL PLASCHKE
Roger Craig, the Giants' manager, began this series hoping that he would not have to see Mike Hartley pitch for the Dodgers. It's not just because Hartley started the season with eight strikeouts in five scoreless innings, but because it was Craig who taught Hartley how to throw the split-finger fastball. It is Hartley's best pitch. "Funny how that works out," said Hartley, who met Craig in the winter of 1986 when Hartley was working out at Grossmont College in El Cajon.
SPORTS
March 9, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
Millionaire relief pitcher Bruce Sutter, now with the Atlanta Braves, has made the split-fingered fastball famous, but he may have company this season. Eric Show of the Padres has been toying with the split-fingered fastball since the third day of spring training. He's learning the pitch from Jack Lamabe, the Padres' Double-A pitching coach. "We were fooling around with the pitch, and it moved right off the bat when I threw it," Show said. "I took to it real quick.
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