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SPORTS
May 1, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
Tuesday night it seemed to be Christmas in April for Fox Sports West. First the defending Stanley Cup champion Los Angeles Kings and then the suddenly struggling Los Angeles Clippers were involved in key playoff games shown on the channel. Except then the Kings went into overtime, jamming themselves right against the Clippers-Memphis game. The channel dealt with the conflict by showing the games simultaneously on a split screen. On Wednesday, FS West explained the decision in a statement: "We attempt to work with the leagues to avoid playoff scheduling conflicts in advance.
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SPORTS
May 1, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
Tuesday night it seemed to be Christmas in April for Fox Sports West. First the defending Stanley Cup champion Los Angeles Kings and then the suddenly struggling Los Angeles Clippers were involved in key playoff games shown on the channel. Except then the Kings went into overtime, jamming themselves right against the Clippers-Memphis game. The channel dealt with the conflict by showing the games simultaneously on a split screen. On Wednesday, FS West explained the decision in a statement: "We attempt to work with the leagues to avoid playoff scheduling conflicts in advance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The crises continue. These are grave times that television is chronicling as NATO continues air strikes against Serbs accused of engaging in ethnic cleansing against Albanians in Kosovo. It was Monday. And like many before him, he was fleeing in a race against time, seeking sanctuary from those hoping to take away his freedom, his desperate exodus captured on TV as he moved from region to region just ahead of his armed pursuers.
SPORTS
May 1, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
Tuesday night, when the defending champion Los Angeles Kings opened defense of the Stanley Cup title at St. Louis, the game went into overtime and overlapped the start of the Los Angeles Clippers' key NBA playoff game against Memphis at Staples Center. Because of the conflict, Fox Sports West displayed the Kings and Clippers game in a split-screen format, something that made neither fan base happy. Clippers fans were able to catch that game on a full screen on TNT. Wednesday afternoon, Fox Sports West and Prime Ticket issued this apology: “We sincerely apologize to the Kings and the Clippers and their fans,” said Steve Simpson, senior vice president and general manager for Fox Sports West and Prime Ticket.  “We didn't serve them as well we should have with our coverage of last night's games.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A visibly anguished President Bush said Friday that television networks made him look as though he "didn't give a damn" about U.S. soldiers killed in Panama when they used split-screen techniques to show him bantering with reporters at the White House as the caskets of American dead were being carried from a C-141 Starlifter in Delaware.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
A man and a woman in their late 30s or early 40s meet at a wedding. She (Helena Bonham Carter) looks particularly ill-at-ease in her bridesmaid's dress as she ducks into corners trying to find a place to smoke. He (Aaron Eckhart) watches her with amused interest and finally asks the bartender to wish him luck. As the reception winds down, the two of them sit at a table, sparring lightly like strangers who've got each other's numbers.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2004 | Nick Anderson and Scott Collins, Times Staff Writers
The split screen gave the GOP fits. On the day after the first presidential debate, many Republicans fretted that side-by-side images of President Bush and Sen. John F. Kerry drew attention to the president's expressions of irritation and annoyance while the Democratic challenger looked confident and composed.
SPORTS
June 3, 1989
What a race on ABC! Teresa Fittipaldi took a big lead, but Shelley Unser battled back. Then it was Teresa, then Shelley. Teresa. Shelley. Then a split-screen of both! Too bad they kept interrupting the race with pictures of silly cars. PAUL SCHOWALTER Ontario
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1990
So President Bush was distressed by TV's use of the split screen depicting him speaking with a light heart as the somber coffins arrived from Panama (Part A, Jan. 6). It does indeed seem a bit unfair, almost as unfair as Lee Atwater's frequent use of Willie Horton bracketed with Michael Dukakis in the 1988 election campaign. You sow, you reap. KRAMER J. ROHFLEISCH La Mesa
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1990
To televised executions without context is to remove the public will. A simple reading of the charges and conviction will not suffice. Required is a graphic presentation of the crime, perhaps on a split screen, with its attendant horror to the victim. The moment of realization that one is going to die at the hands of this criminal. The crime's ongoing effects. The unending sorrow of the victim's family and friends. The loss to the community of a citizen. The loss of contributions to society.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before getting my taxes done. The Skinny: Is it football season yet? Oh, well. Thursday's headlines include layoffs at Walt Disney Co., China yanks "Django Unchained" and Fox tries a new way to keep viewers watching during commercials. Daily Dose: When does synergy cross the line into shameless self-promotion? Watchers of "NBC Nightly News" get to think about that all the time. The most recent example was this week when, during a story about North Korea's stepped-up nuclear activity, a scene from the "Weekend Update" segment of "Saturday Night Live" was used to illustrate a point.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Amy Reiter
They didn't bring their horses and bayonets -- nor did they discuss foreign (or domestic) policy or go at each other in split screen -- but the contestants on "The Voice" continued to battle it out in pairs Monday night, just before President Obama and Mitt Romney faced off in their final presidential debate. As "The Voice" battle rounds rolled through Night 5 -- with more to go -- this phase of the competition started to feel as endless as the race for the White House. But fear not, we'll move on to the knockout rounds soon enough, with voting on the live shows set to commence the very week we'll go to the polls to cast our ballots in a different sort of vote.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before making a counter offer for Variety. The Skinny: I'm almost through the Pete Townshend autobiography, so look for my review in the days ahead. Wednesday's headlines include a look at Jay Penske, the new owner of Variety; a debate over the use of split-screens during the debates; and Big Bird saying: Don't use me in your political ads. Daily Dose: The Pac-12 Network was originally only going to carry one USC football game this season (against Cal a few weeks ago)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
In the end, not even "The Avengers" could save the summer box office. Astronomical receipts for the early May smash starring some of Marvel's biggest superheroes - which has become the third highest-grossing film of all time - weren't enough to prevent the summer box office from closing down roughly 3% to $4.3 billion compared to the same period from May to Labor Day in 2011. Attendance, meanwhile, tumbled about 4% to 533 million, according to Hollywood.com, the lowest number in almost 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Times Film Critic
— "Napoleon" came. "Napoleon" was seen. "Napoleon" conquered. At 9:40 p.m. Saturday, the near-capacity crowd at the 3,000-seat Paramount Theatre rose from the places it had settled into eight hours earlier and cheered a mighty cheer, the kind of full-throated, sustained roar not usually heard in a movie theater. The audience had just lived through one of the world's great cinematic experiences: an all-day screening (complete with snack and dinner breaks) of Abel Gance's mesmerizing 51/2-hour silent film from 1927, accompanied by Carl Davis conducting the 46-piece Oakland East Bay Symphony, performing his own superb score.
WORLD
December 13, 2009 | By Jim Tankersley
Outside, tens of thousands of eco-protesters paraded through the streets of Copenhagen waving bright yellow signs with slogans such as "There is No Planet B." Inside, environmentalists and other observers watched the protest marches on television as negotiators shuttled between closed-door meetings in hopes of making progress on a new climate agreement. The action at the Copenhagen climate summit Saturday was the sort of split-screen reality that has come to define the gathering as it heads toward its second week -- loud in public, mysteriously quiet in private.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | Kevin Thomas
The American Cinematheque and Outfest's annual "Queer Shorts" program includes the L.A. premiere of Alan Brown's 29-minute "O beautiful," one of the most eloquent, powerful offerings in the program's seven-year history. It opens with a high school youth, Brad (Jay Gillespie), staggering through a field at night, a gash on his head and clad only in a sweatshirt.
NEWS
January 20, 1987 | Associated Press
If President Reagan calls the locker room of the winning Super Bowl team Sunday, his congratulations will be private because CBS won't put the President on the air, it was reported today. Ted Shaker, the executive producer of CBS Sports and of the Super Bowl game, told the Miami Herald his network will not try to match NBC's interview with Reagan during the Fiesta Bowl halftime show Jan. 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2006 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
Nearly everything about "Snake River," the centerpiece of an absorbing but frustrating show at the Gallery at REDCAT, involves a split, a duality. The two-channel video was made by two artists, Charles Gaines and Edgar Arceneaux, both based in Los Angeles. It was supported and exhibited through the joint effort of two institutions, REDCAT and the Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, and is accompanied by a two-volume catalog due out in November.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
A man and a woman in their late 30s or early 40s meet at a wedding. She (Helena Bonham Carter) looks particularly ill-at-ease in her bridesmaid's dress as she ducks into corners trying to find a place to smoke. He (Aaron Eckhart) watches her with amused interest and finally asks the bartender to wish him luck. As the reception winds down, the two of them sit at a table, sparring lightly like strangers who've got each other's numbers.
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