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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009
While reading Betsy Sharkey's article on the boys of summer ["Some Heroes Save Us, Others Need Saving," July 5], I was waiting for the part where she addresses the grown-up version of the summer superhero male instead of Chris Pine's eyes. Many of us who came away from "Star Trek" interested in Zachary Quinto's thinking-woman's hero Spock found it interesting that brains can be part of an action hero and wondered why all the talk of Chris Pine's eyes. Amber Bryan Boston
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012
Are you an ultra-modern new parent who wants to raise kids the tried-and-tested midcentury way? "Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care," the bestselling child-rearing bible, will be available as an ebook starting next week, Skyhorse Publishing has announced. Dr. Spock's manual has sold more than 50 million copies and gone through nine editions since its initial publication in 1946; now parents can read it on Kindle, Nook or iPad. Three other Dr. Spock books have already made the ebook leap: "Dr. Spock's The School Years," "Dr. Spock's The First Two Years" and "Dr. Spock's Pregnancy Guide.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1986 | Sue Facter
Remember that cylindrical space coffin that bore the body of Spock in "Star Treks" II and III? Now your pet can go out the same way. Pet Rest, a Lima, Ohio-based animal burial service, offers a black, sleek, cylindrical plastic receptacle that comes in four sizes. It's the brainchild of Sandy and Mike McCormack, parents of a 14-year-old Trekkie son. They got the idea after burying three deceased family pets in less style, followed by Sandy's dream about Spock's coffin.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The Westwood-area home that actor Leonard Nimoy bought with his first wife, Sandra Zober , has sold for $1.95 million. The traditional-style house, built in 1938, also has contemporary elements and features window seats, high ceilings, walls of windows, skylights and two fireplaces. There are four bedrooms, four bathrooms and 3,664 square feet of living space. Outdoor amenities include a swimming pool, a spa and a pool house. The couple bought the house in 1968 when Nimoy was playing Spock on "Star Trek.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1985 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
One of the most ballyhooed videocassettes ever is "Gone With the Wind," which may be the most ballyhooed movie ever. The videocassette is expensive--$89.95--but fans of this 1939 classic are buying it anyway. It debuted on the Billboard magazine sales chart at No. 5. It's surprising that this wasn't out before Christmas. What an attractive item for gift-buyers. "Gone With the Wind" isn't a sure No. 1. It may have trouble dislodging "Star Trek III: The Search For Spock" from the the top spot.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Simon Pegg is as close as you can get to a real-life geek superhero; his special powers include a real affection for Comic-Con culture and stepping into that imaginary world. As a boy, Pegg was swept away by his geek loves: live theater and the fantastical worlds of "Star Wars," "Doctor Who," "Jason and the Argonauts" and "Star Trek. " He now lives the impossible dreams of his youth, acting for Steven Spielberg and stepping onto the deck of the Starship Enterprise as Scotty in J.J. Abrams' "Star Trek" reboot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998
Re James Pinkerton's Column Right, "Baby Boomers and Narcissism Come Groping," March 19: Pinkerton says that Dr. Benjamin Spock inspired excess affection and created the narcissism of a generation of boomers. Spock promoted the idea of respect for the child, not indulgence. Only a child who has been treated with empathetic respect, as if his feelings mattered, is capable of feeling for the plight of others. If later this respect for the child translated to saying "no" to the Vietnam War and "yes" to civil rights, then I'm all for it. It was narcissistic and authoritarian thinking that got us into Vietnam and that resisted civil rights reform.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
"I'm going to write about the dark times," Adam Nimoy explained to his mother when he began working on "My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life," which he calls "an anti-memoir." "Like when you and Dad were out of town on some 'Star Trek' press junket and I was strung out on the floor of that men's room downtown. . . ." "That . . . that . . . that never happened to you!" Nimoy's mother protested. "No, Ma, I know. But that's what people want to hear."
NEWS
November 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Baby doctor Benjamin Spock was fitted with a cardiac pacemaker Tuesday, several days after being hospitalized for injuries suffered when he fainted and fell, hospital officials said. Spock, 84, was listed in excellent condition, a spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Simon Pegg is as close as you can get to a real-life geek superhero; his special powers include a real affection for Comic-Con culture and stepping into that imaginary world. As a boy, Pegg was swept away by his geek loves: live theater and the fantastical worlds of "Star Wars," "Doctor Who," "Jason and the Argonauts" and "Star Trek. " He now lives the impossible dreams of his youth, acting for Steven Spielberg and stepping onto the deck of the Starship Enterprise as Scotty in J.J. Abrams' "Star Trek" reboot.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009 | Noel Murray
Star Trek Paramount, $29.99/$34.98; Blu-ray, $39.99 Director J.J. Abrams and a team of writers demonstrate the proper way to revamp a franchise with their wildly entertaining "Star Trek," a thrilling summer blockbuster that captures the collegial spirit of the original TV series while tinkering with its underpinnings just enough to placate both newcomers and persnickety Trekkies. An exciting young cast -- top-lined by Chris Pine as a headstrong, twentysomething James T. Kirk and Zachary Quinto as a more-emotional-than-usual Mr. Spock -- romp through a galaxy- hopping story that involves ancient grudges, family ties and a poignant use of time travel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009
While reading Betsy Sharkey's article on the boys of summer ["Some Heroes Save Us, Others Need Saving," July 5], I was waiting for the part where she addresses the grown-up version of the summer superhero male instead of Chris Pine's eyes. Many of us who came away from "Star Trek" interested in Zachary Quinto's thinking-woman's hero Spock found it interesting that brains can be part of an action hero and wondered why all the talk of Chris Pine's eyes. Amber Bryan Boston
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
It's still strange to see Leonard Nimoy smile. For decades, Nimoy has been the impassive face of pure alien logic as "Star Trek's" Mr. Spock, so it's a bit unnerving to see him flash a big grin while recounting a very special presidential salute. "During the campaign, Barack Obama gave me the Vulcan greeting at a fundraiser," the 78-year-old actor said, holding up his palm in Spock's signature split-finger gesture. "That was pretty memorable. Timothy Leary gave me the salute once too.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
"I'm going to write about the dark times," Adam Nimoy explained to his mother when he began working on "My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life," which he calls "an anti-memoir." "Like when you and Dad were out of town on some 'Star Trek' press junket and I was strung out on the floor of that men's room downtown. . . ." "That . . . that . . . that never happened to you!" Nimoy's mother protested. "No, Ma, I know. But that's what people want to hear."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2007 | Times staff writers Geoff Boucher, Sheigh Crabtree and Jevon Phillips.
Highlights from Comic-Con, the annual celebration of all things pop culture, at the San Diego Convention Center through Sunday. For updates through the weekend, go to latimes.com/entertainment/news. -- The world's largest pop-culture event is getting bigger all the time -- the International Comic-Con in San Diego had its first weekday sellout in its 38-year-history on Friday.
OPINION
March 22, 1998
The medical community is saddened by the death of Dr. Benjamin Spock (March 17). I was fortunate to have had Spock as my advisor at Western Reserve University Medical School in the 1960s. He was a towering, vigorous, charismatic teacher in the lecture hall, a magician with the children in the clinic and a kind friend and confidant in the hallways. His office was lined wall to wall with copies of "Baby and Child Care," in almost every language. He was initially a psychiatrist by training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1992 | AL MARTINEZ
I know a man who is so religious he sees images of Jesus or the Virgin Mary at least once every few months in everything from bathwater to slices of enriched white bread. He is one of those who saw Mary in the bark of a Chinese elm tree in North Hollywood awhile back (it turned out to be a fungus disease) and traveled to New Mexico to see the face of Jesus in a flour tortilla (skillet burns). I also know a man who is an atheist and believes religious emotionalism is making the world crazy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2007 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
FOR the German monk searching for signs of God in "Star Trek," the obscure storeroom on the fourth floor of UC Riverside's main library was worth the trans-Atlantic pilgrimage. Bernhard Janzen pored over television scripts and a video clip from "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine," and noticed how an African American space station captain had found a religious stone tablet and, much like Moses, smashed it on the ground as he shepherded an oppressed people toward freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Actor Leonard Nimoy of "Star Trek" fame remembers well that mysterious moment on a long-ago Shabbat. Seated in an Orthodox synagogue in Boston with his brother, father and grandfather, Nimoy, then 8, had dutifully done as his father had asked. During a climactic moment in the service, he was told not to look. He covered his eyes with his hands.
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