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HEALTH
February 5, 2007
It's a shame you did not explicitly state the possible dangers of microwaving sponges to kill germs if the sponges are not sopping wet [Jan. 29, "Nuke Those Sponges!"]. Your article did not take into account the fact that microwaves vary in their wattage and power. The nonmetallic wet sponges (with scrubber) that I nuked burned holes about the size of quarters less than two minutes into the process. I was left with a toxic stench and smoke that filled the room for a long while afterward.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Susan Denley
Jeremy Scott showed his first collection for Moschino at Milan Fashion Week on Thursday, and he incorporated elements from SpongeBob SquarePants, Budweiser, Hershey's, McDonald's and other icons of pop culture (or consumerism). [The Cut] Lena Dunham says she felt completely respected by the way Vogue handled her shoot for the February cover -- but she lost some respect for Jezebel for the way it reacted by trying to prove she'd been Photoshopped and not backing down when it turned out she wasn't.
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SCIENCE
July 11, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
“Speedy” might sound like an odd adjective to describe a sponge, but researchers have discovered a fast-growing community of marine sponges off the eastern coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Their findings, published Thursday in the journal Current Biology, challenge the hypothesis that Antarctic life responds slowly to climate change. Severe cold and scarce food in the Antarctic led many scientists to believe that its inhabitants responded to climate change at a glacial pace, said Laura Fillinger, a biologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany, and the study's lead author.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
With objects as diverse and mundane as kitchen sponges, steel downspouts, T-shirts and garden hoses, Lynn Aldrich has been crafting whimsical sculptures and installations for more than 20 years. Her current exhibition at Art Center College of Design is a delightfully quixotic retrospective in keeping with the eclectic spirit of her work. Visitors are greeted by a rain of steel downspouts, hanging vertically over the entrance to the galleries. Varying in length, their insides are painted in various shades of blue.
HEALTH
January 29, 2007 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
MOST people, confronting a sponge soaked in a disgusting brew of raw sewage containing fecal bacteria, viruses, protozoan parasites and bacterial spores, would shriek, "Yuck!" Not so researchers at the University of Florida. They deliberately created the stinking concoction to answer a question: What's the best way to decontaminate the filthy, pathogen-infested kitchen sponge, to be found in even the most sparkling, granite-countered kitchen? Their finding: Zap the sponges in a microwave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Surgeons accidentally sew up sponges inside their patients, causing complications, far more often than has been reported, a medical journal has reported. "Despite precautions, the incidence of this problem is grossly underestimated," doctors at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson said. "The true magnitude of this problem is difficult to appreciate owing to reluctance to report this complication," they added.
SCIENCE
August 23, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists say they have identified an ocean sponge living in the darkness of the deep sea that grows thin glass fibers capable of transmitting light better than industrial fiber-optic cables used for telecommunication. The natural glass fibers also are much more flexible than manufactured fiber-optic cable, which can crack if bent too far, a team from Bell Laboratories reported in this week's issue of Nature.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the first part of this century, natural sponges were as common in American homes as bars of soap or glass bottles of milk. They were used for bathing and for general cleaning chores--and virtually all of them came from Tarpon Springs. But in the mid-1940s, the industry went belly up. A so-called red tide devastated Florida's sponge beds, and synthetic sponges were introduced to replace the natural ones.
SCIENCE
April 15, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Researchers at UC San Diego have invented a microscopic sponge that can mop up toxins, including a drug-resistant staph bacterium and even snake venom. The so-called nanosponge was tested only on mice. It worked well when injected into healthy mice that then were infected with the toxin from a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that has become resistant to multiple antibiotics. About 89% survived the lethal doses. Fewer than half, or 44%, survived when the nanosponge was injected after the infection.
SCIENCE
September 26, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Talk about a sea monster! This underwater Cookie Monster is actually a trio of purple sea sponges ( Alpysina archeri ) that have fused together to form a strong resemblance to the perennially hungry Muppet. Photographer Mauricio Handler stumbled across this "Cookie Monster of the sea" while on a diving trip to Curacao in the Caribbean, and could not resist taking a few shots. PHOTOS: Weird sea creatures and strange fish "Usually I do more serious work with dolphins, whales and sharks, but this was just fun," he told the Los Angeles Times.
SCIENCE
September 26, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Talk about a sea monster! This underwater Cookie Monster is actually a trio of purple sea sponges ( Alpysina archeri ) that have fused together to form a strong resemblance to the perennially hungry Muppet. Photographer Mauricio Handler stumbled across this "Cookie Monster of the sea" while on a diving trip to Curacao in the Caribbean, and could not resist taking a few shots. PHOTOS: Weird sea creatures and strange fish "Usually I do more serious work with dolphins, whales and sharks, but this was just fun," he told the Los Angeles Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Parents, get ready for more nautical nonsense. Viacom Inc.'s Nickelodeon has made a deal with Activision Blizzard Inc.'s publishing arm to develop and publish video games based on the network's cartoon "SpongeBob SquarePants. " Santa Monica-based Activision Publishing Inc. has signed on as the master video game licensee for the kids' show featuring the porous character, Nickelodeon said Thursday. SpongeBob games had previously been made by THQ, which filed for bankruptcy last year.  Earlier this year, Activision and Nickelodeon reached an agreement to make games based on the network's "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" animated show, which THQ also used to work on. Nickelodeon and Activision announced a new "Ninja Turtles" game last week.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll The first game to surface from the expanded, multi-year deal will be called "SpongeBob SquarePants: Plankton's Robotic Revenge," and will be released in October, the companies said.  That game will be available on  Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Nintendo Wii and Wii U and the Nintendo DS and 3DS handheld devices.  ALSO: Univision confirms split with radio host Eddie 'Piolin' Sotelo Audiam helps artists get paid from plays of their songs on YouTube Tired of blockbusters: Moviegoers want Adam Sandler, not 'Pacific Rim' Follow on Twitter: @rfaughnder ryan.faughnder@latimes.com MORE...
SCIENCE
July 11, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
“Speedy” might sound like an odd adjective to describe a sponge, but researchers have discovered a fast-growing community of marine sponges off the eastern coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Their findings, published Thursday in the journal Current Biology, challenge the hypothesis that Antarctic life responds slowly to climate change. Severe cold and scarce food in the Antarctic led many scientists to believe that its inhabitants responded to climate change at a glacial pace, said Laura Fillinger, a biologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany, and the study's lead author.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Netflix said it plans to let its deal to carry Nickelodeon, BET and MTV content expire next month, even though it continues to discuss licensing certain shows. The video subscription service said it has been moving away from broad, multi-year deals with networks and cable channels, in favor of more selective licensing arrangements to carry programs that will work best for its subscribers. Netflix Chief Executive Reed Hastings, in a letter to shareholders, said a recent deal with Warner Bros.
SCIENCE
April 15, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Researchers at UC San Diego have invented a microscopic sponge that can mop up toxins, including a drug-resistant staph bacterium and even snake venom. The so-called nanosponge was tested only on mice. It worked well when injected into healthy mice that then were infected with the toxin from a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that has become resistant to multiple antibiotics. About 89% survived the lethal doses. Fewer than half, or 44%, survived when the nanosponge was injected after the infection.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
You can learn a lot about history by studying the objects in our home, said Amy Azzarito, author of the new book “Past & Present: 24 Favorite Moments in Decorative Arts History and 24 Modern DIY Projects Inspired by Them” ($27.50; Abrams ). Designer Kate Pruitt's do-it-yourself modern Gustavian clock, for example, is based on the 18th century designs of Swedish farmers who built them for extra income. More than a century later, the restrained style influenced a revival of Gustavian furniture by Ikea.
NEWS
February 27, 1987
Toxic shock syndrome, a life-threatening illness that has been linked to the use of tampons and contraceptive sponges, appears also to be a rare complication of flu, government scientists said. Researchers at the federal Centers for Disease Control, in studies reported in today's Journal of the American Medical Assn.
MAGAZINE
November 29, 1987
We are sending more and more of our young men to the Persian Gulf in order to protect our oil supplies. Is this the price we have to pay so that a few hundred thousand cozy Californians won't have to see a speck on the horizon? As for the environmental concerns, with improved efficiency and safety precautions, devastating oil spills should become a thing of the past. In fact, oil-drilling platforms will become home to hundreds of species of marine life, such as mussels, scallops, anemones, corals, sponges, fish and sea lions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
The bullet that struck Larney Johnson while he was playing basketball with friends punctured his kidney before lodging in his spine and immediately paralyzing him. Paramedics rushed him to California Hospital Medical Center in Los Angeles, where surgeons repaired his kidney. But three years later, he said, doctors made a startling discovery: a surgical sponge had been left behind. Johnson had to undergo a second operation to remove the sponge before spending six weeks in bed recovering.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
As a child of the San Fernando Valley, I knew the yuletide as a time of frost-free mornings when I could not see my breath. Turning down my collar against the warm, I would trudge sludgeless streets past yards absent of snowmen, where green and even flowering hedges hid no foes waiting to pelt me with snowballs, on my way to school, where we would sing songs of sleigh rides and mistletoe and holly. Of Frosty. Rudolph. Santa. Later at home, the family would gather before the television set, our glowing hearth, to watch actors on hot Hollywood sound stages aspire not to perspire beneath their sweaters and scarves and overcoats as they shook the cornstarch from their boots as if entering stage left from a winter's day in Minneapolis or Cincinnati.
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