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SPORTS
April 1, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
Quiksilver announced Tuesday that it had ended its more than 20-year sponsorship of surfer Kelly Slater. Slater, one of the world's most recognizable surfers and athletes, has been sponsored by the Huntington Beach-based action sports company since he was 18 years old. Slater is the youngest and the oldest surfer to win the ASP World Championship; among his multiple wins was the ASP title at both age 20 and 39. “There is little I...
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Joe Flint
FX Networks has brewed up a big deal with MillerCoors. The cable unit of 21st Century Fox has struck a three-year deal with MillerCoors that will make the brewer the official beer sponsor for the FX, FXX and FXM networks. The agreement is non-exclusive, meaning FX Networks will still be able to sell commercial time to other beer makers. However, MillerCoors will have exclusivity on any product-placement in FX Networks' programs and a first-look deal for future shows. PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV MillerCoors already has a visible presence on FX Networks.
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SPORTS
April 27, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The foundation that runs the Bing Crosby National Pro-Am said Friday that it would stand by its "solid commitment" to AT&T despite Kathryn Crosby's offer to reconsider cutting the family's ties to the golf tournament if it turned down phone company sponsorship. Mrs. Crosby reacted coolly to the statement, suggesting that there have been "whisperings of cash changing hands" to produce the decision. Said Mrs.
SPORTS
April 1, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
Quiksilver announced Tuesday that it had ended its more than 20-year sponsorship of surfer Kelly Slater. Slater, one of the world's most recognizable surfers and athletes, has been sponsored by the Huntington Beach-based action sports company since he was 18 years old. Slater is the youngest and the oldest surfer to win the ASP World Championship; among his multiple wins was the ASP title at both age 20 and 39. “There is little I...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1987 | MIKE GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
Yet another sticking point has emerged in the negotiations between the San Diego Symphony Assn. and orchestra musicians. Sources close to the talks revealed last week that the two groups had reached tentative agreement on a contract that would include sponsorship of a Summer Pops program this year. But now, sources say, the symphony has informed musicians that management's deadline for sponsorship of the Pops--which the association has said will cost $2 million--passed April 3.
OPINION
December 14, 2010
A decade or so ago, corporate marketing at public schools reached a peak. Slick lunch menus featured full-color illustrations of M&Ms ? delivering messages about good nutrition ? and schools held Coca-Cola rallies. Students worked on donated computers, the screens rimmed by advertising. School fliers urged parents to "Pick the products that earn cash" for their schools by buying certain cereals. The past 10 years have produced a backlash to such school-based marketing, a change we applaud.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2012 | By Matea Gold and Melanie Mason
Washington Bureau WASHINGTON - Eight months into Mitt Romney's tenure running the Salt Lake City Olympics, he had some good news for the cash-strapped organizing committee, which still was short $179 million. Nu Skin Enterprises, a Utah-based distributor of nutritional supplements and beauty products, would sponsor the 2002 Olympic Winter Games and the U.S. Olympic Team in a deal worth $20 million. Romney, who announced the arrangement along with company executives, touted the partnership as the perfect fit. Both Nu Skin and the Olympics were "about taking control of your life and managing your own destiny," he told 10,000 Nu Skin distributors Oct. 15, 1999, the Deseret News reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1990
In attacking U.S. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Lomita) ("Dabbling in Artistic Censorship," April 26) for his criticism of the National Endowment for the Arts, your editorial confuses censorship and sponsorship. "He who pays the piper calls the tune" is the time-honored dictum. Rohrabacher is representing his constituents who want some judgment exercised over their sponsorship of the arts. We have that right. I have yet to see Rohrabacher question non-tax-sponsored art. Let those artists who would offend taxpayers find their own sponsors who approve of their work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | AILEEN MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Japanese businessman Kazuaki Tazaki, who sings light opera in the bath but can't play a note on any musical instrument, pumped $845,000 into Britain's struggling Halle Orchestra on Thursday. Tazaki, head of the Brother International Europe office equipment company, announced a three-year sponsorship program to help the orchestra survive. "We have music playing in our factories," Tazaki said in the northern city of Manchester where the Halle symphony is based.
NEWS
April 3, 2008
Beijing Olympics: An item in Friday's Cause Celebre column in the Calendar section reported that George Clooney had asked Swiss watchmaker Omega, a company for which he serves as a spokesman, to reconsider its sponsorship of the Summer Olympics in Beijing. The star has instead urged Omega to consider speaking out about China's foreign policy, according to a Clooney representative.
SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | By Jim Peltz
Herbalife Ltd. said Thursday a new U.S. probe of the nutritional products maker would not affect its sponsorship of the Galaxy and other teams and athletes. The company, whose business practices have been publicly attacked by a Wall Street investment manager, said Wednesday it now was the subject of a civil probe by the Federal Trade Commission but provided no other details. Money manager Bill Ackman has alleged Herbalife, whose nutrition and weight-management products are sold by independent salespeople, is effectively a pyramid scheme.
SPORTS
September 19, 2013 | By Jim Peltz
The ripple effects of the cheating scandal surrounding NASCAR's Chase for the Cup title playoff widened Thursday. The NAPA auto parts chain said it would drop its multimillion-dollar sponsorship of Michael Waltrip Racing - specifically its backing of MWR's Martin Truex Jr. in NASCAR's Sprint Cup Series - after this year. "After thorough consideration, NAPA has made the difficult decision to end its sponsorship," the company said on its Facebook page. "NAPA believes in fair play and does not condone actions such as those that led to the penalties assessed by NASCAR" against Waltrip's team, the company stated.
SPORTS
April 9, 2013 | By Jim Peltz
The black NASCAR truck with a white "54" on the side gleamed on pit road as its driver walked up for the night's race, prompting three dozen photographers and well-wishers to edge closer. The attraction was 19-year-old Darrell Wallace Jr. As Wallace posed for the cameras at Daytona International Speedway, the public address announcer called out his name and added: "That's a driver many people are waiting to see. " Indeed they are - especially the executives who run NASCAR - because Wallace is an African American.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By August Brown
Kanye West may be a fashion maven, but he doesn't have much love for a "Suit & Tie. " At his Friday London gig at the Hammersmith Apollo, West took about 10 minutes out of his set to tear into Justin Timberlake's new single, the Grammys and corporate sponsorship of pop music. It's classic Ye: making enemies of powerful figures , lambasting institutions that fail to recognize his genius, and a continued wrinkle in his complicated relationship with music and commerce.  The "Suit & Tie" jab might be most surprising, as the song prominently features his longtime collaborator and "Watch the Throne"-mate Jay Z. "I got love for Hov, but I ain't ... with that 'Suit & Tie'," West said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
When the Los Angeles Philharmonic launched its series of live broadcasts to cinemas in 2011, the organization touted it as an innovative program intended to broaden the popular reach of the orchestra and its star conductor, Gustavo Dudamel. But two seasons later, the orchestra has had to pull the plug on the series due to a difficult economic environment. Deborah Borda, president of the orchestra, said in a statement that the L.A. Phil Live series "was not able to garner the sponsorship required to move forward," despite corporate support from Rolex, the luxury watchmaker that was the official sponsor of the cinema series.
SPORTS
September 5, 2012 | By Jim Peltz
As the musical chairs continue among NASCAR Sprint Cup Series drivers for 2013, Sam Hornish Jr. still finds himself without a full-time seat. Hornish, the former IndyCar champion and Indianapolis 500 winner, has been driving Penske Racing's No. 22 Cup car since early July in place of A.J. Allmendinger, who failed a drug test and later was released from the team. There was speculation that Hornish might stay in the car again next year. But Penske announced Tuesday that Joey Logano, who is leaving Joe Gibbs Racing, will take over the No. 22 car next season and join Penske's other Cup driver, Brad Keselowski.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2001
In response to Diane Haithman's article "Delayed Flights" (March 10), I would like to propose that the problem may not lie in sponsorship, but in the angels themselves. I counted the word "artist" used more than 10 times to describe the project. However, the angels in this project that I have seen in print and in person resemble primitive craft at best. I work as a sculptor in the film industry. I work alongside men and women who are truly touched by God in their abilities to render the human (as well as superhuman)
NATIONAL
August 25, 2012 | By Matea Gold and Melanie Mason
Washington Bureau WASHINGTON - Eight months into Mitt Romney's tenure running the Salt Lake City Olympics, he had some good news for the cash-strapped organizing committee, which still was short $179 million. Nu Skin Enterprises, a Utah-based distributor of nutritional supplements and beauty products, would sponsor the 2002 Olympic Winter Games and the U.S. Olympic Team in a deal worth $20 million. Romney, who announced the arrangement along with company executives, touted the partnership as the perfect fit. Both Nu Skin and the Olympics were "about taking control of your life and managing your own destiny," he told 10,000 Nu Skin distributors Oct. 15, 1999, the Deseret News reported.
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