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Spoony Singh

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
The group of men whom Spoony Singh raised a glass with in 1964 included the owner of a traveling circus with a collection of wax figures, which may explain why somebody suggested Hollywood as the perfect setting for a wax museum. The next day, Singh flew from Victoria, Canada, to stroll the streets of Hollywood. Popping into the hot spots, he failed to see a single celebrity but noticed that plenty of the non-famous made do with the footprints of the stars at Grauman's Chinese Theatre.
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BUSINESS
December 21, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Dissing Angelina Jolie normally isn't the best way to get ahead in this town. But tough times call for tough tactics in the war of the Hollywood wax museums. Madame Tussauds, which considers itself the ne plus ultra of wax artistry — with the $25 ticket price to match — is trying to best its cheaper competitor, the Hollywood Wax Museum, with a new marketing blitz stressing the defects in its rival's paraffin starlets, singers and comics. In a wax version of a cola taste test, Madame Tussauds plans to let visitors decide whose figures most closely resemble their glamorous living counterparts.
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BUSINESS
December 21, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Dissing Angelina Jolie normally isn't the best way to get ahead in this town. But tough times call for tough tactics in the war of the Hollywood wax museums. Madame Tussauds, which considers itself the ne plus ultra of wax artistry — with the $25 ticket price to match — is trying to best its cheaper competitor, the Hollywood Wax Museum, with a new marketing blitz stressing the defects in its rival's paraffin starlets, singers and comics. In a wax version of a cola taste test, Madame Tussauds plans to let visitors decide whose figures most closely resemble their glamorous living counterparts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
The group of men whom Spoony Singh raised a glass with in 1964 included the owner of a traveling circus with a collection of wax figures, which may explain why somebody suggested Hollywood as the perfect setting for a wax museum. The next day, Singh flew from Victoria, Canada, to stroll the streets of Hollywood. Popping into the hot spots, he failed to see a single celebrity but noticed that plenty of the non-famous made do with the footprints of the stars at Grauman's Chinese Theatre.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989 | RON RUSSELL, Times Staff Writer
The owner of the Hollywood Wax Museum plans to buy two landmark movie theaters on Hollywood Boulevard--the Hollywood and the Vogue--and convert them into tourist attractions. Spoony Singh said he hopes to convert the historic Hollywood Theater to a Guinness Book of World Records attraction that would be "the largest of its kind." "We thought about a Ripley's Believe It Or Not (attraction), but decided that Guinness was better," Singh said.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1985
After six years of declining attendance, the 21-year-old Buena Park museum was sold by Chicago-based Six Flags Corp. for more than $5 million to F & P Operations, a San Francisco-based partnership that includes Thomas L. Fong, who owns the wax museum at Fisherman's Wharf and other attractions in San Francisco. But Spoony Singh, owner of the Hollywood Wax Museum, has filed suit in state Superior Court to stop the sale, contending that he had an earlier agreement with Six Flags to buy the museum.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1985 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
A losing bidder has sued to reverse the sale Tuesday of the Movieland Wax Museum in Buena Park to the operator of the Wax Museum at Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco. The Buena Park attraction was sold for more than $5 million to F and P Operations, operator of the San Francisco wax museum. But shortly after the transaction, another wax museum owner, Spoony Singh, sued to stop the sale by Six Flags Corp., which had owned the Movieland museum since 1969.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | CHRIS GEITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
George, Kramer, Elaine and Jerry pose in a set reminiscent of the final "Seinfeld" episode. The only thing missing is the New York traffic noise, canned laughter and any sign of a pulse. The latest exhibit at the Hollywood Wax Museum, "Seinfeld" may give Pamela Anderson, and the rest of her sculpted-wax "Baywatch" buddies, a run for their money. Los Angeles' most renowned kitsch palace is located in the heart of Hollywood Boulevard's Walk of Fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1985 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
Since he took over as general manager for the new owners of Movieland Wax Museum in Buena Park five months ago, Ronald Fong has projected nothing but executive aplomb. This aura of calm, however, seems to fly in the face of Movieland's recent history. The wax museum's attendance plummeted even lower last year--to 440,000 from its 1976 high of 1 million--and the tourist-attraction industry in general, the Disney parks included, remains shaken by increased competition and fiscal uncertainty.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | HILLARY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Hollywood Wax Museum, which turned 30 last month, is the stuff of apocryphal memoriesfor many an Angeleno. "Oh yeah," says one Orange County native, an architect who now lives in Italy. "I went there in a limo on the way to the senior prom." But times have changed in 30 years. Now restaurants resemble theme parks, and thrill rides are considered tame unless the G-force gives you a temporary face lift.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989 | RON RUSSELL, Times Staff Writer
The owner of the Hollywood Wax Museum plans to buy two landmark movie theaters on Hollywood Boulevard--the Hollywood and the Vogue--and convert them into tourist attractions. Spoony Singh said he hopes to convert the historic Hollywood Theater to a Guinness Book of World Records attraction that would be "the largest of its kind." "We thought about a Ripley's Believe It Or Not (attraction), but decided that Guinness was better," Singh said.
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