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Sport Injuries

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SPORTS
February 8, 1990
French Open champion Michael Chang, who suffered a stress fracture in his left hip while practicing last December, will return to tournament play in the Volvo Tennis/Indoor at Memphis, Tenn., Feb. 26-March 4.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger and Marc Lifsher
After more than a year of intense lobbying by professional sports leagues, California has slammed the door on most athletes looking to file injury claims in the state, including those with serious brain injuries. Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed legislation that significantly limits workers' compensation claims by pro players. It's a significant victory for the National Football League, which has been trying to reduce its financial exposure to concussions and other brain injuries that former players allege are the result of repeated blows to the head.
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SPORTS
October 14, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if it isn't already going to be hard enough for Dodger fans to watch the Cincinnati Reds in the World Series, now there is this story. It was the last day of May, at Dodger Stadium, shortly before the first meeting between the top two contenders in the National League West. When the Dodgers' Jay Howell was leaving the field after batting practice, he was intercepted by a tall Reds pitcher wearing a protective sleeve on his right elbow. Howell recognized the sleeve.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2012 | David Lazarus
It's amazing how easily the smallest healthcare mix-up can spin out of control and leave the patient on the hook for thousands of dollars in medical bills. In Jim Furlan's case, his journey into the healthcare Twilight Zone began in September when his then-15-year-old daughter injured her knee playing in a volleyball tournament in Las Vegas. "She was rushed to the hospital in extreme pain," he recalled the other day. "They had to give her morphine. " The girl then flew home to Manhattan Beach, where her doctor ordered an MRI at Torrance Memorial Medical Center.
SPORTS
January 17, 1991 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raider tailback Greg Bell, out for three months because of a sprained ankle, has been strolling the sideline during games dressed in expensive Italian suits. But he hopes to trade his suits for a football uniform Sunday when the Raiders play at Buffalo in the AFC championship game. "Now I've got the best suit of all ready to be put on this weekend, my football suit," Bell said.
SPORTS
February 14, 1989 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Cutlass Reality, the favorite in Sunday's San Antonio Handicap at Santa Anita, broke a small bone in his right front ankle, ending his racing career. The 7-year-old horse will be retired to stud and is expected to stand in California, where three farms are interested. Cutlass Reality led the San Antonio after a half-mile, was passed by Super Diamond, the eventual winner, on the far turn and then quickly dropped back in the seven-horse field.
SPORTS
November 8, 1999 | Associated Press
Charlotte Hornet rookie Baron Davis, who had major surgery on his left knee two years ago as a freshman at UCLA, has injured the knee again and will have an MRI today. "It's not the ACL [which he tore in college] or anything," said the third pick of the 1999 NBA draft. "Just something nagging. I've never had it before." "If it does show a tear we'll have to make a decision," Charlotte Coach Paul Silas said. "He didn't look to bad, but if we don't have Baron we have to find a point guard."
TRAVEL
January 11, 1998 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
A winter getaway to the mountains for skiing, snowshoeing, hiking or sledding seems effortless and simple, not to mention fun. But talk to physicians, emergency medical technicians and ski patrol members who work in local mountain communities and it's clear: Dangers lurk, and some can kill. That reality has been demonstrated, tragically, twice in the last month with the skiing deaths of politician/singer Sonny Bono in South Lake Tahoe last week and Michael Kennedy, son of the late Sen. Robert F.
HEALTH
May 3, 2004 | John Briley, Special to The Washington Post
The cure-all acronym RICE -- rest, ice, compression and elevation -- is great for ankle sprains. But other ailments require targeted treatment. Here is some guidance from the website www.sportsinjuryhandbook.com. * Muscle pulls: Rest and apply ice (20 minutes on, 20 minutes off) until pain and swelling subside. As soon as tolerable, begin gently stretching the muscle.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | Jeannine Stein
As the kids head back to school they'll also head back to team sports. So brace yourselves, moms and dads, for the injuries that can come with that. A new study sheds some light on which sports are more likely to produce severe injuries, derailing athletic participation for weeks. Injury data on nine sports were collected during the academic year from 2005 through 2007 in 100 high schools nationwide by researchers from the Ohio State University College of Medicine and the Center for Injury Research and Policy in the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, both in Columbus.
SPORTS
December 14, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
The horror stories in pro sports are coming so fast and furious that their significance is being lost in their numbers. It should be the other way around, but it's not. Another concussion. Ho hum. Player A will sit out two games, Player B a month. Page 5. Another league investigation, maybe some fines. Yawn. — After the Oct. 23 game against the New York Jets, San Diego Chargers guard Kris Dielman got on the plane to return home. During the game, he had taken a hit loud enough to be heard on TV. He staggered, looked disoriented and was approached by two concerned game officials.
NEWS
December 13, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Young athletes account for about 4 million injuries a year in the U.S. Of course, playing sports comes with an inherent risk of being hurt. But there are some types of injuries this expert says may be preventable. Brian Grasso, founder and chief executive of the International Youth Conditioning Assn., speaks with Chicago Tribune fitness writer Julie Deardorff during a live Web chat Tuesday at 10 a.m. PST. Join the online discussion to learn about everything from ACL tears to concussions.
OPINION
September 20, 2010
It's her money to spend Re "Record set in gov.'s race," Sept. 16 New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg "bought" his election, spending "$109 million on his 2009 reelection bid. " He is so successful that two years ago he persuaded the City Council to change its term-limits rules. Yet Meg Whitman is criticized for "self-funding" her campaign. Both of these people are putting their money where their mouths are. They owe no one, and can take the credit or the blame for what happens.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | Jeannine Stein
As the kids head back to school they'll also head back to team sports. So brace yourselves, moms and dads, for the injuries that can come with that. A new study sheds some light on which sports are more likely to produce severe injuries, derailing athletic participation for weeks. Injury data on nine sports were collected during the academic year from 2005 through 2007 in 100 high schools nationwide by researchers from the Ohio State University College of Medicine and the Center for Injury Research and Policy in the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, both in Columbus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. James Nicholas, 85, whose pioneering work on sports injuries included four operations on Joe Namath's knees, died Saturday of colon cancer at his home in Scarsdale, N.Y. Nicholas founded the world's first hospital-based center for the treatment and prevention of sports injuries at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan, now known as the Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma. In the 1960s and 1970s, Nicholas was team doctor for the New York Jets, Knicks and Rangers.
HEALTH
January 9, 2006 | Greg Miller, Special to The Times
WHEN Alicia Di Rado Dingsdale tore her hip flexor muscle in a soccer game in 2004, she was determined not to let it hold her back. A week later she ran a 5-kilometer race in Arcadia. "By the time I finished I was crawling," she says. She did physical therapy for a few months and eased back into running -- but not slowly enough. "I had missed running so much I started doing too much," says the 36-year-old.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger and Marc Lifsher
After more than a year of intense lobbying by professional sports leagues, California has slammed the door on most athletes looking to file injury claims in the state, including those with serious brain injuries. Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed legislation that significantly limits workers' compensation claims by pro players. It's a significant victory for the National Football League, which has been trying to reduce its financial exposure to concussions and other brain injuries that former players allege are the result of repeated blows to the head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1998
Re "Little League Officials Not Liable for Injuries to Player, Panel Rules" (March 17): It is refreshing to see some logic and common sense restored in our legal system. Most of the nonsense lawsuits are more likely due to greed than concern for the young players' safety. One wonders if any lawyer would have taken on this suit were all monetary award to be solely channeled into a trust fund to support research and measures toward reducing sports' inherent perils. JOHN CHIU Newport Beach
HEALTH
June 20, 2005 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
Sooner or later, almost everyone gets sidelined by an injury that keeps them from being physically active. Twisted ankles, tendinitis, pulled muscles and the more serious torn shoulder rotator cuffs used to mean weeks of inactivity and, with it, unwanted pounds that only complicated recovery. These days, "we approach injury much like we would with any athlete," says physical therapist Thomas Papke, a spokesman for the American Physical Therapy Assn.
HEALTH
May 3, 2004 | John Briley, Special to The Washington Post
The cure-all acronym RICE -- rest, ice, compression and elevation -- is great for ankle sprains. But other ailments require targeted treatment. Here is some guidance from the website www.sportsinjuryhandbook.com. * Muscle pulls: Rest and apply ice (20 minutes on, 20 minutes off) until pain and swelling subside. As soon as tolerable, begin gently stretching the muscle.
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