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SPORTS
January 20, 2002 | STEVE JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
NEW YORK -- Dick Schaap began in this business at age 15, taking high school scores for Jimmy Breslin at the Review Star, gone these many years. Thursday a lot of people whose names you recognize paid tribute in a memorial service at the magnificent Cathedral of St. John the Divine in Manhattan. In between Dick made this a better business. The sports business, the book business, the magazine business, the television business, the newspaper business.
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SPORTS
March 3, 2013 | David Wharton
Word got around that Jack Kent Cooke wanted to cash out. It was 1977 and the Lakers owner had entered into a divorce that would eventually cost $41 million, a sum worthy of the Guinness World Records for the most costly marital split in history at that time. His mounting legal bills created an opportunity for an eager buyer named Jerry Buss. The onetime chemist, now wealthy from the real estate boom, wanted to purchase not only the Lakers but also the Forum and the Kings. Buss had one problem -- he wasn't the highest bidder.
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NEWS
June 9, 2001 | LARRY STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woman sitting next to David Stern in the center-court seats at Staples Center is Heidi Ueberroth, who has been traveling in elite circles her whole life. Yes, she is the daughter of Peter Ueberroth, but that is not why she gets to sit with the NBA commissioner.
SPORTS
December 15, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin, Los Angeles Times
Guggenheim Baseball bought the Dodgers this year for $2 billion, more than twice the amount ever spent on a baseball team. The new owners have not stopped spending. Just last weekend, the team committed more than $200 million to two pitchers, one of whom never has thrown a pitch in a major league game. The projected player payroll next year stands at about $225 million, which means the Dodgers would dethrone the New York Yankees as the biggest spenders in baseball history. In all, the Dodgers' new owners have invested close to $1 billion in player contracts, stadium renovations and the purchase of controlling interest in the stadium parking lots.
SPORTS
March 3, 2013 | David Wharton
Word got around that Jack Kent Cooke wanted to cash out. It was 1977 and the Lakers owner had entered into a divorce that would eventually cost $41 million, a sum worthy of the Guinness World Records for the most costly marital split in history at that time. His mounting legal bills created an opportunity for an eager buyer named Jerry Buss. The onetime chemist, now wealthy from the real estate boom, wanted to purchase not only the Lakers but also the Forum and the Kings. Buss had one problem -- he wasn't the highest bidder.
SPORTS
June 23, 2003 | Larry Stewart
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, heard, observed, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed. What: "On the Ball." Authors: David M. Carter and Darren Rovell. Publisher: Prentice Hall. Price: $24.95. Sports and business have become intertwined in our society. Business executives often use sports metaphors when making presentations.
SPORTS
March 29, 2012 | By David Wharton
Six months ago, the smart money had Frank McCourt walking away from the Dodgers with little more than a battered reputation. The beleaguered owner had sunk into a quagmire of debt — taking the team into bankruptcy — and had settled a contentious divorce with his ex-wife, Jamie, by agreeing to pay the seemingly massive sum of $131 million. Most experts figured he'd be lucky to unload the franchise for just enough to break even. But that was then. This week, McCourt stands to pocket, after all the bills are paid, about half of the $2.15 billion offered by a group led by Magic Johnson.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Jeremy Lin's buzzer-beating three-pointers and underdog past have basketball fans and neophytes alike hooked on one of the most captivating — and pun-happy — Linderella tales in a while. Now, if only businesses could figure out what to do with him. Retailers caught unprepared for his sudden ascent have hustled to get Lin-branded merchandise on their shelves. But the big money for Lin isn't in shirts and caps; it's in his image and his staying power — and what he and major sponsors can do with that.
SPORTS
November 23, 2008 | KURT STREETER
The latest economic news from the sports world presents us with a mixed-up, bipolar scramble. ESPN just inked a fat, $500-million contract to broadcast a full plate of college football bowl games beginning in 2011, a deal more than 50% bigger than the one currently in place. But General Motors, cash-strapped and having already pulled support from two NASCAR tracks and golf's Masters tournament, announced it won't run a commercial during this season's Super Bowl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2003 | David Wharton and Jean Merl, Times Staff Writers
For athletes who play second fiddle on the American scene -- soccer players, shot putters, cyclists -- the new Home Depot Center in Carson is, as one of them put it, "a mecca." The complex, which opens today, features matching soccer and tennis stadiums, a world-class track, practice fields and, soon, the continent's only indoor velodrome. Rarely have 85 acres and $150 million in private money been devoted to a facility outside the realm of football, basketball and baseball.
SPORTS
December 5, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
Rankman and SportsBusiness Journal have teamed up for a first-they-have-heard-about-it collaboration based on SBJ's seventh annual analysis of bowl gifts provided to players. This year's most popular gift is the Fossil watch, provided at 19 of the 35 bowls. USC is too lousy at 7-5 to crack Rankman's top 25, but part of the Trojans' Sun Bowl gift package will include a Helen of Troy hair dryer. Meineke Car Care participants from Minnesota and Texas Tech will receive a 32-inch flat screen, a belt buckle, T-shirt, lapel pin and backpack.
SPORTS
October 6, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
The Lakers' first exhibition game is on television Sunday night, but not on my television, and probably not on your television. This is not rumor. This is not urban legend. This is not some glitch. This is real. As of now, the majority of the games played this season by the new-look, buzz-soaring, championship-or-bust Lakers will not be seen in the majority of Los Angeles households. Odds are, you didn't know this. Chances are, you wouldn't discover it until you turned on your TV to watch Steve Nash's Lakers debut against the Golden State Warriors in Fresno on Sunday at 7 p.m. Just a guess, but you're going to wear out your thumb trying to scroll to a channel that isn't there, and then yank at your roots trying to figure out how this could happen.
SPORTS
July 16, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
The "Granddaddy of Them All" has hit the mother lode. ESPN has agreed to pay an average of $80 million a year to broadcast the Rose Bowl game from 2015 through 2026, Sports Business Journal first reported. That's an increase of 167% from the current deal, which pays $30 million annually. "The Rose Bowl Game is one of sport's most meaningful and celebrated events," John Skipper, ESPN president, said in a written statement. "Extending our relationship long term with such a prestigious brand will play a significant role in the way fans continue to define ESPN — as the leading destination for college football all year long.
SPORTS
March 29, 2012 | By David Wharton
Six months ago, the smart money had Frank McCourt walking away from the Dodgers with little more than a battered reputation. The beleaguered owner had sunk into a quagmire of debt — taking the team into bankruptcy — and had settled a contentious divorce with his ex-wife, Jamie, by agreeing to pay the seemingly massive sum of $131 million. Most experts figured he'd be lucky to unload the franchise for just enough to break even. But that was then. This week, McCourt stands to pocket, after all the bills are paid, about half of the $2.15 billion offered by a group led by Magic Johnson.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Jeremy Lin's buzzer-beating three-pointers and underdog past have basketball fans and neophytes alike hooked on one of the most captivating — and pun-happy — Linderella tales in a while. Now, if only businesses could figure out what to do with him. Retailers caught unprepared for his sudden ascent have hustled to get Lin-branded merchandise on their shelves. But the big money for Lin isn't in shirts and caps; it's in his image and his staying power — and what he and major sponsors can do with that.
SPORTS
September 19, 2011 | By Helene Elliott
Roger Goodell led the NFL through a lockout without losing regular-season games and with a minimum of acrimony, ensuring labor peace for a decade. David Stern saved the NBA after it had lost its appeal and financial footing. Bud Selig, awkward on camera, is savvy enough behind the scenes to have helped Major League Baseball enjoy a long period of labor harmony. Everyone's kid has played soccer, but MLS Commissioner Don Garber is still trying to turn participants into paying customers.
SPORTS
December 15, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin, Los Angeles Times
Guggenheim Baseball bought the Dodgers this year for $2 billion, more than twice the amount ever spent on a baseball team. The new owners have not stopped spending. Just last weekend, the team committed more than $200 million to two pitchers, one of whom never has thrown a pitch in a major league game. The projected player payroll next year stands at about $225 million, which means the Dodgers would dethrone the New York Yankees as the biggest spenders in baseball history. In all, the Dodgers' new owners have invested close to $1 billion in player contracts, stadium renovations and the purchase of controlling interest in the stadium parking lots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1986
The verdict in the highly publicized lawsuit by the United States Football League against the National Football League was confused and contradictory--a reflection of the vague status that professional sports have as a business in this country. Jurors who heard the antitrust case in New York decided that the older and wealthier NFL does indeed have a monopoly on professional football. But they awarded the young USFL only the most minimal damages--$3.
SPORTS
February 19, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin
Jamie McCourt wants nearly $1 million per month in temporary support from her estranged husband, an amount disclosed in a court filing in which her lawyers allege Frank McCourt has engaged in a "carefully calculated subterfuge designed to mislead the court" about his financial resources. The filing, unsealed Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court, includes details of how Frank McCourt hopes to transform the Dodgers from a baseball team into the anchor of a sports business empire that could include cable television channels broadcast in English and Spanish; homes, shops and a football stadium within the Dodger Stadium parking lots; and the purchase of a soccer club in China and another in the English Premier League.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2009 | Claire Noland
James H. Warsaw, a Newport Beach entrepreneur who helped change the perception of sports from games with bats and balls to a business of dollars and cents, has died. He was 61. Warsaw died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications from infections, his brother Robert said Saturday. He also suffered from Parkinson's disease.
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