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SPORTS
April 2, 2008
The Times' Bill Plaschke has been selected by the Associated Press Sports Editors as the best sports columnist for newspapers with more than 250,000 circulation for his work in 2007. It was the fourth time he has won the award, the third time in the last four years. "I'm feeling equally honored and humbled," said Plaschke, who has been judged among the top 10 in eight of the last nine years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2011
Manuel Galban Award-winning Cuban guitarist Manuel Galban, 80, a Grammy-winning Cuban guitarist who rose to international fame as a member of the Buena Vista Social Club, died Thursday of a heart attack in Havana. Born in 1931 in Gibara, in the eastern province of Holguin, Galban made his professional debut in 1944, according to his publicist. In 1963 he joined Los Zafiros, Spanish for "The Sapphires," which fused styles as varied as bolero, calypso and rock with Cuban filin music, which comes from the word "feeling.
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SPORTS
February 13, 1985 | BILL SHIRLEY, Times Staff Writer
Joe Namath once dismissed sportswriters as "hundred-dollar-a-week creeps," but one columnist set him straight. "We're not, either," the writer advised. "We're $200-a-week-creeps." Namath probably would be surprised at how much the lot of the sports columnist has improved. Take the roles of Dallas writers Blackie Sherrod and Skip Bayless, for example. They have been the leading characters in a circulation fight between the Times Herald and Morning News that has fascinated the newspaper industry.
SPORTS
November 20, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
He was the biggest man in town. Joe McDonnell always got the scoop, whether it was Pat Riley being fired or Wayne Gretzky being traded, Magic Johnson's comeback or Mike Scioscia's contract, no secret too deep, no detail too obscure. Athletes loved him. Sources trusted him. Fans followed him. Nobody beat him. He was the biggest man in town. Joe McDonnell weighed 740 pounds. That is not a misprint. Visiting players would gasp. Insensitive fans would jeer. Everywhere he lumbered, somebody would stare.
SPORTS
November 20, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
He was the biggest man in town. Joe McDonnell always got the scoop, whether it was Pat Riley being fired or Wayne Gretzky being traded, Magic Johnson's comeback or Mike Scioscia's contract, no secret too deep, no detail too obscure. Athletes loved him. Sources trusted him. Fans followed him. Nobody beat him. He was the biggest man in town. Joe McDonnell weighed 740 pounds. That is not a misprint. Visiting players would gasp. Insensitive fans would jeer. Everywhere he lumbered, somebody would stare.
SPORTS
February 27, 1990
Sports columnist Will McDonough of the Boston Globe, who also is a commentator for CBS, was in fair condition after suffering a heart attack.
SPORTS
July 15, 1989
Scott Ostler, sports columnist at The Times since 1980, has resigned to become a sports columnist for a newly proposed sports newspaper called The National, which is expected to begin publishing sometime early next year. Ostler, 41, was named California Sportswriter of the Year five consecutive years, 1982-86, by the National Assn. of Sportscasters and Sportswriters. Before working at The Times, he wrote for the Lompoc Record and the Long Beach Press-Telegram.
SPORTS
June 22, 1985
Blackie Sherrod, sports columnist on the Dallas Morning News, was the recipient Friday in Cincinnati of the fifth annual Red Smith Award for "an extended meritorious career in the art of sportswriting." Previous winners of the award were the late Red Smith of the New York Times, Jim Murray of The Times, Shirley Povich of the Washington Post and Fred Russell of the Nashville Banner.
SPORTS
February 13, 1985 | BILL SHIRLEY, Times Staff Writer
As the year began, commercials heralding "The Move" appeared on Dallas television screens. A big sports celebrity was about to change jobs. The use of such prominent Dallas sports figures as Cowboy receiver Drew Pearson, Texas Ranger Manager Doug Rader and Maverick basketball Coach Dick Motta in the commercials led to the suspicion that it was someone the stature of, say, Tom Landry or Tony Dorsett. It was.
SPORTS
August 11, 1987 | Associated Press
After a weekend that was supposed to highlight the best of soccer, an upstart import was applauded Monday for overshadowing the latest case of fan rowdiness at English sports. From event organizers to newspaper columnists, American football was hailed as an exciting, family oriented game unsullied by the misbehavior in the crowds that has become an uninvited guest at so many sports events in England in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2010 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The role a Los Angeles police commissioner played in the domestic abuse case of a popular sports columnist raises questions of a possible conflict of interest, said the head of the city's police union. Debra Wong Yang, a high-profile attorney and member of the civilian commission that oversees the LAPD, was involved briefly in representing Jay Mariotti, an ESPN personality and sports writer. Mariotti was arrested last month on suspicion of domestic abuse after he allegedly got into a physical confrontation with his girlfriend and police were summoned to the Venice-area apartment they shared.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2010 | By David Davis
Bill Plaschke, The Times' award-winning sports columnist, has occasionally been accused of mawkishness. But if it's true that violin strings sometimes seem to accompany his prose, it's also true that his best, most heartfelt work involves those who operate far from the klieg lights of Staples Center and the Rose Bowl. His classic story about Sarah Morris, a Dodgers-obsessed blogger with cerebral palsy, transcended fandom. So too his moving profile of Ricky Rosas, a disabled water boy who became the unofficial mascot of the USC football team, revealed an unlikely brotherhood.
SPORTS
April 2, 2008
The Times' Bill Plaschke has been selected by the Associated Press Sports Editors as the best sports columnist for newspapers with more than 250,000 circulation for his work in 2007. It was the fourth time he has won the award, the third time in the last four years. "I'm feeling equally honored and humbled," said Plaschke, who has been judged among the top 10 in eight of the last nine years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2005 | David Lyman, Special to The Times
There's a new chapter being written in the Cult of Celebrity handbook -- one with no spoiled athletes, playgirl heiresses or adulterous movie stars involved. It's taking place in the unlikely world of newspapers, a field with so few national superstars that it is usually hard-pressed to come up with a decent scandal. True, there were the Stephen Glass and Jayson Blair affairs. But they were just promising up-and-comers, unknown to the general public until they went bad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
Will Grimsley, who covered the spectrum of sports for four decades as a reporter, columnist and special correspondent for the Associated Press, has died. He was 88. Grimsley, who retired in 1984, died Thursday of heart failure in East Meadow, N.Y. Grimsley's byline was one of the best known in sports as he reported for nearly half a century from the world's biggest athletic events, including 15 Olympics, 35 World Series and 25 Kentucky Derbies. Born in Monterey, Tenn.
SPORTS
June 15, 2000 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "Battle of the Books?" Not even eight months after his death, there are three books about Payne Stewart on the shelves, which should be enough to tell the story and are clearly more than enough to generate a controversy about who owns the intellectual-property rights to a subject.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
The thing that makes 1999 different in pro football is that it's the year of the young quarterback. And for the NFL's numerous new young leaders, the learning curve has been a league-wide happening. In one conspicuous case Sunday, the new Miami quarterback, Damon Huard, grew up on national television. In the first half against New England, he couldn't make a first down in the first quarter but caught the hang of it in the second quarter and drove the Dolphins into a 10-10 halftime tie. Learning some more in the third quarter, Huard drove the Dolphins in front with two touchdowns that made it 24-10, a lead that stood up through the rest of the NFL's game of the week, though Huard left with a broken nose.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | BOB OATES, Latimes.com Columnist
The thing that makes 1999 different in pro football is that it's the year of the young quarterback. And for the NFL's numerous new young leaders, the learning curve has been a league-wide happening. In one conspicuous case Sunday, the new Miami quarterback, Damon Huard, grew up on national television. In the first half against New England, he couldn't make a first down in the first quarter but caught the hang of it in the second quarter and drove the Dolphins into a 10-10 halftime tie. Learning some more in the third quarter, Huard drove the Dolphins in front with two touchdowns that made it 24-10, a lead that stood up through the rest of the NFL's game of the week, though Huard left with a broken nose.
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