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Sports Drinks

HEALTH
May 26, 2012 | By Ashley Dunn, Los Angeles Times
Take a look at the most popular endurance sport drinks and you'll notice a surprising similarity in ingredients. There are carbohydrates (usually in the form of sugar), sodium, potassium and sometimes a touch of protein. You'll notice something else - these drinks are expensive. It can cost $1.75 or more to fill one 24-ounce water bottle - and you have to drink a bottle an hour to keep up a good flow of nutrients and liquid while you work out. There's an easy way around the expense: making your own endurance drink.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 2011 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Say it ain't so, Rudy. Daniel "Rudy" Ruettiger, the 5-foot-6 walk-on Notre Dame football player whose underdog story became the 1993 movie "Rudy," has seen his sports drink venture turn out less happily — with allegations of securities fraud. In a lawsuit Friday, the Securities and Exchange Commission accused Ruettiger, 63, and 12 others of swindling investors in Rudy Nutrition, a Gatorade challenger he started with a college friend in South Bend, Ind. Ruettiger got in trouble when he moved the company to Las Vegas in 2007 and joined a fast crowd that pumped out promotions to penny-stock investors.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Children may be coming up short when it comes to drinking low-fat milk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. A recent report from the National Center for Health Statistics finds that, although milk and milk products are recommended in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and by the American Academy of Pediatrics , kids may not be drinking enough of the lower-fat kind. Overall, 72.6% of teens and children drink milk daily. Boys drink more milk than girls -- 77.7%, compared with 67.4%.
NEWS
July 30, 2011 | By Daniela Hernandez, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Good news:  Americans are cutting back on the amount of added sugar they're eating, according to new research  -- from about 3.5 ounces a day in 2000 (25 teaspoons, or 375 calories) to 2.7 ounces a day in 2008 (19 teaspoons, or 285 calories). The term “added sugars” was promoted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to help people make the distinction between sweetened foods with low nutritional contents - items like soft drinks and candy bars - and naturally sweet foods such as fruits and some vegetables.
NEWS
July 13, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Drinking six to eight glasses of water each day is healthful, most health experts agree. But apparently not everyone is on the same page. A general practitioner from Scotland says that health advice is “thoroughly debunked nonsense” and is propagated by bottled water companies out to make a profit. In a commentary published online in the British Medical Journal , Margaret McCartney quotes experts that say drinking too much water can cause hyponatremia (low sodium levels in the blood)
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
For those concerned about teens drinking too many sugary beverages, this may be good news: Water, milk and fruit juice are the drinks most likely to be consumed by high school students, not soda. Or so they say.  In a survey last year of high school students, 72% said they drink a glass of water each day, 42% drink at least one glass of milk, and 30% drink fruit juices daily. Only 24% said they drank regular soda (or pop), though when other sugary drinks such as sports drinks, sweetened coffee drinks (ah, yes, those sweetened coffee drinks)
HEALTH
March 6, 2011 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was evidently good enough for Gilligan and Robinson Crusoe. But is coconut water a healthy choice for people who aren't stranded on a deserted island? A longstanding treat in tropical regions across the globe, coconut water hit U.S. supermarkets a few years back and is now being marketed with a vengeance. Sometimes billed as nature's sports drink, the slightly sour beverage has also acquired a reputation for being able to improve circulation, slow aging, fight viruses, boost immunity, and reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke.
HEALTH
February 6, 2011
Rhabdomyolysis caused by overexertion can lead to serious medical problems, including kidney damage. The condition and its complications can be prevented by taking these precautions: ? When performing repetitions of strength-training exercises, build up slowly over several days and weeks. ? Go especially slow when building up repetitions of eccentric, or muscle-lengthening, exercises. ? Avoid overexertion in hot weather. ? Stay hydrated when performing strength exercises, just as with aerobic workouts.
NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
It's hardly news that many sports fans drink before and during games, but how much they drink might be. In testing fans of professional football and baseball teams after a game, researchers found 40% had consumed alcohol and 8% were legally drunk. A University of Minnesota preliminary study published online this week in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research tested blood alcohol levels for 362 adults as they were leaving 13 baseball games and three football games. Those with blood alcohol levels of .08 or greater were considered drunk.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2011 | By Emily Bryson York
Battling back from a dismal 2009, Gatorade is refocusing on competitive athletes, and a new ad campaign seeks to carve out a market for three workout beverages. The Chicago-based unit of PepsiCo Inc. is airing commercials that promote its G Series, a trio of drinks it introduced last year that target student athletes' needs before, during and after a workout or athletic event. "It's a more holistic view," said Morgan Flatley, director of consumer engagement at Gatorade. "In our mind there's a tremendous amount of opportunity for the types of product we can deliver in the future for before, during and after activities," Flatley added, hinting at Gatorade's plans to introduce products other than beverages next year.
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