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NEWS
December 7, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
The Tribeca Film Festival in New York City will feature a new component next April: the Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival, with ESPN dedicating television, radio, print and online resources to promoting it. "We hope to inspire filmmakers to make sports-themed films with this new platform in mind and thereby raise the level of the genre," said John Skipper, ESPN executive vice president.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - In its ascent up the mountain of American popular culture, the NFL has studiously protected its brand, turning down many Hollywood offers to collaborate and limiting the extent of the partnerships it has forged. So much for all that. The NFL's famously cautious mindset goes the way of leather helmets and the single-wing offense on Friday when Summit Entertainment releases "Draft Day," a film from and about professional football. The movie - the product of a marriage brokered by Hollywood mainstay WME - thrusts the league into the world of big-time film and sets a new standard for cooperation between a professional sports entity and entertainment-world heavyweights.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1986 | DAVID T. FRIENDLY, Times Staff Writer
While writing "Hoosiers," the story of a tiny Indiana high school's improbable journey to the state basketball finals, screenwriter Angelo Pizzo kept a small placard above his word processor. It read: "This is not a sports movie." To Pizzo and director David Anspaugh, "Hoosiers" was really about characters and relationships. Basketball was simply the backdrop. Still, Pizzo and Anspaugh knew that "Hoosiers" (opening this fall) would be a tough sell, and indeed it was.
SPORTS
August 15, 2013 | By David Wharton
It was the talk of London before and after the opening ceremony for the 2012 Summer Olympics. Queen Elizabeth II and actor Daniel Craig -- you may know him as James Bond -- collaborated on a videotaped skit that ended with a pair of stuntmen parachuting live into Olympic Stadium, one dressed as Craig, the other wearing the queen's pink dress. On Thursday, it was reported that the man doubling for Craig, former military officer Mark Sutton, was killed while wingsuit diving in Switzerland.
SPORTS
February 24, 2007 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
It was a different time, but it could apply to today's sports world. Professor Quincy Wagstaff, the newly appointed president of Huxley College, addressing two professors, asks, "Do we have a university? Do we have a football team?" When the professors say, "Yes," Wagstaff replies, "Well, we can't afford both. Tomorrow we start tearing down the university." The above is from the 1932 Marx brothers movie "Horse Feathers." The role of Wagstaff is played by Groucho Marx.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007
"The Comebacks," a sendup of inspirational sports films, and "The Ten Commandments," an animated version of the story of Moses, open today. Because their distributors did not screen the movies in advance, The Times' reviews will appear in Monday's Calendar and online as soon as they are available.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2000
John Clark hits a home run regarding sports films that are popular because we can identify more closely with the underdogs than the superstars ("It's the Losers That We Love," Aug. 20). The public will always embrace the athlete that comes out of nowhere to be a superstar purely for the love of the game. We will continue to watch and root for them simply for the belief that one day we too could be that perfect. JAMES COLE Rancho Santa Margarita Clark writes that "the best sports films star underdogs like us."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1998
In "Goofy vs. the Gipper" (Nov. 28), Michael X. Ferraro refers to George Gipp as "the mythical Notre Dame player portrayed by Ronald Reagan in 'Knute Rockne, All American.' " Gipp was hardly mythical. He was a real-life, flesh-and-blood human being, one of the greatest athletes in the storied history of Notre Dame football. It is to Hollywood's discredit that it has failed to make a full-blown feature film about Gipp, whose true-life exploits run the gamut from action, drama, humor and intrigue to romance and pathos.
SPORTS
August 15, 2013 | By David Wharton
It was the talk of London before and after the opening ceremony for the 2012 Summer Olympics. Queen Elizabeth II and actor Daniel Craig -- you may know him as James Bond -- collaborated on a videotaped skit that ended with a pair of stuntmen parachuting live into Olympic Stadium, one dressed as Craig, the other wearing the queen's pink dress. On Thursday, it was reported that the man doubling for Craig, former military officer Mark Sutton, was killed while wingsuit diving in Switzerland.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1998 | MICHAEL X. FERRARO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Heads up, sports-cinema fans. In case you missed it, the Gipper has officially been touchdown-sized from the local multiplex. The mythical Notre Dame player portrayed by Ronald Reagan in "Knute Rockne, All American" and his heroic ilk have been indefinitely benched in favor of "The Waterboy." The substitution speaks volumes. In trading high values for low blows, studios and producers have opted for a game plan of instant gratification.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
We're lucky if we have the gift to do one thing well in this life. Even most superheroes just get a single superpower. ("Wait - you're faster than a speeding bullet and you're more powerful than a locomotive? How is that fair?") So there is something about the multiple-graced - the physicist with the body of a supermodel or the wrestler who writes award-winning poetry - that can seem most unnatural. But inspirational as well: "You Don't Know Bo: The Legend of Bo Jackson," the final film in the second of ESPN's "30 for 30" series of sports films, tells the story of Bo Jackson, who in the late 1980s and early 1990s simultaneously played football for the Los Angeles Raiders and baseball for the Kansas City Royals.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007
"The Comebacks," a sendup of inspirational sports films, and "The Ten Commandments," an animated version of the story of Moses, open today. Because their distributors did not screen the movies in advance, The Times' reviews will appear in Monday's Calendar and online as soon as they are available.
SPORTS
February 24, 2007 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
It was a different time, but it could apply to today's sports world. Professor Quincy Wagstaff, the newly appointed president of Huxley College, addressing two professors, asks, "Do we have a university? Do we have a football team?" When the professors say, "Yes," Wagstaff replies, "Well, we can't afford both. Tomorrow we start tearing down the university." The above is from the 1932 Marx brothers movie "Horse Feathers." The role of Wagstaff is played by Groucho Marx.
NEWS
December 7, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
The Tribeca Film Festival in New York City will feature a new component next April: the Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival, with ESPN dedicating television, radio, print and online resources to promoting it. "We hope to inspire filmmakers to make sports-themed films with this new platform in mind and thereby raise the level of the genre," said John Skipper, ESPN executive vice president.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2006 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
"Goal! The Dream Begins" is an inspirational sports movie, but I liked it anyway. Even the hoariest of its screenwriting conventions gets a fair shake from a good cast, including Stephen Dillane (a Tony Award winner for "The Real Thing") and Anna Friel (part of the London and Broadway cast of "Closer").
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2000
John Clark hits a home run regarding sports films that are popular because we can identify more closely with the underdogs than the superstars ("It's the Losers That We Love," Aug. 20). The public will always embrace the athlete that comes out of nowhere to be a superstar purely for the love of the game. We will continue to watch and root for them simply for the belief that one day we too could be that perfect. JAMES COLE Rancho Santa Margarita Clark writes that "the best sports films star underdogs like us."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1998 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Transition was the watchword at this year's Santa Barbara International Film Festival, which ended Sunday, as founding director Phyllis DePicciotto stepped down after a dozen years at the helm and passed the baton to movie producer Renee Missell, who ran the festival this year. At the end of this year's 13th annual 11-day affair, consensus had it that Missell had succeeded in taking an already solid, diverse festival and bumping it up a few notches, in quality and vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2006 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
"Goal! The Dream Begins" is an inspirational sports movie, but I liked it anyway. Even the hoariest of its screenwriting conventions gets a fair shake from a good cast, including Stephen Dillane (a Tony Award winner for "The Real Thing") and Anna Friel (part of the London and Broadway cast of "Closer").
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2000 | JOHN CLARK
There's a moment in the new football movie, "The Replacements," that may give viewers pause. The film asks us to root for a bunch of has-beens and never-wases who are replacing striking football players. They've been plucked from obscurity, working as bouncers, a sumo wrestler, a bar owner, a cop, a convenience store clerk, a boat bottom scraper. One of them is in the slammer. They're thrilled to be here.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1999 | HARRY BERKOWITZ, NEWSDAY
Investors who want to bet on the financial performance of the New York Knicks and Rangers, the Rockettes and old movies on TV will get a chance to do so in mid-2000, Cablevision Systems Corp. said Wednesday. That's when the company expects to create a so-called tracking stock that breaks off the performance of its sports, film channel and entertainment businesses from that of its cable system operations.
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