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SPORTS
December 16, 1988
Three Los Angeles sports franchise owners--Peter O'Malley of the Dodgers, Jerry Buss of the Lakers and Bruce McNall of the Kings--were named sports executives of the year by Sports inc., a sports-business magazine.
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SPORTS
March 21, 2014
How well will Phil Jackson do in New York? Quite well, I'm sure; after all, he has Jim Buss' cellphone number and a number of castoffs to send west. Lynn McGinnis Glendale :: How to become a millionaire? Just ask Jim Buss. He managed to turn a billion-dollar enterprise into a million-dollar one. Sam Austin Bermuda Dunes :: So the owner of the Knicks believes it is worth $60 million to have Phil Jackson watch the team lose for the next five years? Some might say even that amount isn't enough.
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BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton
The company that owns the Staples Center and the Los Angeles Kings announced late Tuesday it is being put up for sale, sparking a potential billion-dollar bidding war for some of the sports and entertainment world's glitziest properties. The Anschutz Co., run by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz, said it is seeking a buyer for its AEG subsidiary, which also has stakes in the L.A. Live entertainment venue in downtown Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Kings professional hockey team and the Los Angeles Galaxy pro soccer team.
SPORTS
December 14, 2013 | By Jim Peltz
The origin of pro team nicknames ranges from local tradition to fan contests. Here's a snapshot of how the teams in the NBA, MLB, NFL and the NHL got their names, with help from the website Mentalfloss.com: NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSN. Atlanta Hawks - Initially named the Blackhawks like Chicago's hockey team, after the Sauk Indian Chief Black Hawk. It was shortened to Hawks when the team moved to Milwaukee in 1951; the team moved to St. Louis in 1955 and Atlanta in 1968.
SPORTS
January 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A fund-raising drive has been launched to build a domed stadium and attract a National Football League franchise to Portland. Led by U.S. Bancorp Chairman Roger L. Breezley and Portland attorney Ted Runstein, chairman of the Metro Exposition and Recreation Commission, the nonprofit corporation TLP Inc. is starting to seek funds and land for a multimillion-dollar stadium to help win a National Football League franchise during the league's expected expansion in the 1990s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1996 | DAVID M. CARTER, David M. Carter, a sports management consultant in Redondo Beach, is the author of "Keeping $core," recently published by Oasis Press
Cities seeking professional sports expansion teams or trying to lure franchises from other cities--or simply trying to keep their current teams--are now required to make enormous financial concessions to these transient teams. By almost all accounts, the economic impact of a sports franchise on a community is negligible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1991 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council will be asked Tuesday to approve spending more than $6 million for a full-color scoreboard, artwork and other changes as it proceeds with the construction of the city's sports and entertainment complex. The request is within the project's $103-million budget and would allow all 82 luxury suites planned for the arena to be completed when the building opens in September, 1993, Public Works Director Gary Johnson said Friday.
SPORTS
March 27, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Major league owners are expected to approve the three remaining Dodgers bidders on Tuesday, enabling Frank McCourt to start an auction for the team on Wednesday. By the time the auction is over -- late Wednesday, perhaps, or later this week -- the Dodgers are expected to be sold for a record price for a North American sports franchise. The three finalists: --The partnership of Connecticut hedge-fund billionaire Steven Cohen and Los Angeles biotech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong, with a combined net worth estimated at $15.5 billion by Forbes.
SPORTS
March 27, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
Major league owners approved the three remaining Dodgers bidders Tuesday, enabling Frank McCourt to start an auction for the team on Wednesday. By the time the auction is over -- late Wednesday, perhaps, or later this week -- the Dodgers are expected to be sold for a record price for a North American sports franchise. The three finalists: --The partnership of Connecticut hedge-fund billionaire Steven Cohen and Los Angeles biotech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong, with a combined net worth estimated at $15.5 billion by Forbes.
SPORTS
April 17, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
For close to half a century, the O'Malley name was synonymous with the Dodgers. As the Dodgers prepare to welcome new owners, Peter O'Malley and his family are considering whether to try to buy the San Diego Padres. "We are thinking about it," O'Malley told The Times on Tuesday. O'Malley sold the Dodgers in 1998, followed into ownership by News Corp. and Frank McCourt. When McCourt put the team up for sale last year, O'Malley unsuccessfully tried to buy it back. "Our family gave the Dodger pursuit everything we had," O'Malley said.
SPORTS
March 3, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
Tim Harris once played goalie for the Los Angeles Lazers, an indoor soccer team owned by Jerry Buss. Harris, now an executive with the Lakers, said that as he looks back it was obvious what Buss was doing. "He was setting up these labs for his kids to learn," Harris said. "That's how Jeanie learned and that's how I learned. Jeanie and I chuckle at it now. It wasn't that long ago we were sitting in roller hockey league meetings and now we're sitting in NBA league meetings. " Buss earned his fame and accolades by owning the Lakers and Kings.
SPORTS
February 22, 2013
Jerry Buss was one of those few men who seemingly recognized that owning a sports franchise is different than owning any other type of business. He appeared to disdain the mantle of chief executive, choosing instead the role of shrewd yet generous steward serving the millions of us who have always felt that in some small measure, the Lakers are actually "ours. " Most teams have fans that feel that way but few of them possess owners so driven to succeed, so willing to invest their money to do so, and then ready to unassumingly stand to the side when the championships arrive and let the fans revel with "our" team.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
It would be hard to overstate Jerry Buss' impact on the Lakers empire. The 30-year-plus owner of the NBA franchise, who died Monday at age 80, oversaw an era in which the team averaged a championship almost once every three years and injected some purple and gold into L.A.'s Dodger blue blood. Not surprisingly, The Times' print edition on Tuesday was filled with articles on Buss, both on the front page and in the Sports section. The coverage online has also been exhaustive. But for some readers, The Times' coverage was overkill.
SPORTS
February 14, 2013 | Helene Elliott
What had been softly whispered for months, almost as if saying it aloud might make a terrible thing come true, became sad and public knowledge Thursday. Lakers owner Jerry Buss, not seen this season around his beloved team and for nearly a year removed from the limelight, was reported to be in the intensive care unit at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center for treatment of an undisclosed form of cancer. The news, which broke hours before the Lakers' 125-101 loss to the Clippers at Staples Center, wasn't a shock, but it was a reminder of the power of one man to transform a sports franchise and bring a unique and genuine sparkle to a city awash in contrived glamour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - For many, this city's biggest selling point is its proximity to other, more exciting places, like the cosmopolitan hills of San Francisco or the ski slopes of Lake Tahoe. But for almost three decades, there has been one thing people didn't need to leave town for: professional basketball. For Sacramentans, the Kings are more than just an NBA franchise. They're a sign that the city is not second-rate. Fair-weather fans here are scarce; devotees have stuck with the Kings through miserable season after miserable season.
SPORTS
January 18, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Oscars, smoshkers. With his scenery-chewing performance on the sidelines last weekend, Jim Harbaugh has elevated himself to the top of this year's list of the world's greatest dramatic actors. “Maybe he's just being himself?” you say. Well, all the great ones are. I see him more as a sequel to Bobby Knight, a whiny, arrogant and profane antagonist, an unfortunate role model, a troubled and troubling anti-Wooden. The lip-syncing Harbaugh was doing to the refs last Saturday would've made Charlie Sheen blush.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times
Once the pixie dust fades from the Dodgers' new ownership agreement, this hard question will loom: How to restore luster to a historic sports franchise that has acquired a derelict image? And don't forget this corollary: Will the $2-billion price tag on the deal make that task easier or harder? For several years after the McCourts acquired the team in 2004, the franchise's financial books and on-the-field record glowed. The team's revenue nearly doubled to $286 million from $156 million from 2003 to 2009, and the Dodgers reached the playoffs four times in the first six years of the McCourt regime, as my colleague Bill Shaikin observed . More recently, especially after Frank and Jamie McCourt announced their plans for divorce in 2009, the team's fortunes sagged.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | By Sam Farmer, Walter Hamilton and Ricardo Lopez
AEG had barely put itself up for sale Tuesday evening when speculation began to mount that Los Angeles billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong may be in the running to buy all or part of the entertainment giant, according to a person familiar with the situation unauthorized to speak publicly on the matter. The Anschutz Co., run by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz, said it is seeking a buyer for its AEG subsidiary, which has stakes in the L.A. Live entertainment venue in downtown Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Kings professional hockey team and the Los Angeles Galaxy pro soccer team.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Time Warner Cable's new Lakers channels are having trouble taking it to the hoop. On Wednesday, Cox Cable and satellite broadcaster DirecTV went public with complaints about Time Warner Cable's lack of flexibility in negotiating deals for SportsNet and the Spanish-language Deportes, the new television outlets for the Lakers. Launched Oct. 1, Time Warner Cable has yet to strike deals with any other distributors for the channels, which will carry the majority of Lakers games starting October 31. That means millions of Lakers fans could miss lots of games if contracts are not signed soon.
SPORTS
October 2, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
The new owners of the Dodgers could add the Kings, Lakers, Galaxy and an NFL team to their stable. Mark Walter, chairman of the Dodgers and chief executive of Guggenheim Partners, said Tuesday that his company is exploring whether to bid on AEG. In May, Guggenheim bought the Dodgers for $2.15 billion, a world record price for a sports franchise. Officials at AEG - the Anschutz Co. entity that includes sports teams, Staples Center and the Home Depot Center - have indicated they expect the company to sell for $5 billion to $7 billion.
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