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SPORTS
July 7, 1994 | KENNETH REICH
The Coliseum has ordered a new matrix scoreboard and video board system costing $4.8 million to replace boards that had to be taken down as part of the stadium's $50-million earthquake repair. Project director Don C. Webb told the Coliseum Commission Wednesday that the new boards, to be paid for by the federal and state governments because they are a consequence of the Northridge earthquake, will be an improvement over the former boards.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the news conference called last week to demonstrate their trustworthiness, downtown sports arena developers incompletely described the circumstances under which the Lakers and Kings could terminate the contracts obligating them to play in the arena for 25 years--the period necessary to recoup a public investment. L.A. Arena Co. Vice President John H. Semcken III told the news media that the contracts "demonstrate . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A countywide task force seeking to keep the Los Angeles Rams in Orange County must present a competitive proposal within two months to have a chance of retaining the team, the group's chairman said Tuesday. "Timing is important, and moving forward on a concerted effort is important," sports agent Leigh Steinberg after a task force meeting Tuesday. "We have six weeks to two months to promote a plan."
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Councilman Joel Wachs said Thursday that he will back away from a plan that could doom a new sports arena downtown if developers can convince him that their pledge to guarantee repayment of public funds is ironclad. Declaring that his only goal is to see that tax money is not lost to wealthy sports entrepreneurs, Wachs said he is not opposed to deals in which sports stadium developers use public money as long as that money is not at risk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997 | BILL BOYARSKY
An election on the downtown Los Angeles arena is a bad idea. It sounds good, an exercise in direct democracy: "Let the people decide." But that's not the way it will work out. Expect the usual incredibly expensive, completely phony California-style initiative campaign, financed by sources whose true identity is revealed only when the final financial reports are filed--after the vote. Anti-arena forces will protest a giveaway to billionaires.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the news conference called last week to demonstrate their trustworthiness, downtown sports arena developers incompletely described the circumstances under which the Lakers and Kings could terminate the contracts obligating them to play in the arena for 25 years--the period necessary to recoup a public investment. L.A. Arena Co. Vice President John H. Semcken III told the news media that the contracts "demonstrate . . .
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Councilman Joel Wachs said Thursday that he will back away from a plan that could doom a new sports arena downtown if developers can convince him that their pledge to guarantee repayment of public funds is ironclad. Declaring that his only goal is to see that tax money is not lost to wealthy sports entrepreneurs, Wachs said he is not opposed to deals in which sports stadium developers use public money as long as that money is not at risk.
SPORTS
June 24, 1995 | Associated Press
Details of the agreement signed Friday by the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum board of directors and Raider owner Al Davis to return the team to Oakland: * Length: 16 years. Covers 15 football seasons beginning in 1996, with the 1995 season as an additional transition year. * Stadium modernization: $85 million in improvements, including expansion of the Oakland Coliseum to 65,000 seats with 175 luxury suites and new locker rooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reacting to the furor over Disneyland gifts to City Council members, Mayor Fred Hunter said Thursday he will recommend a complete prohibition on gifts to all city officials. The reform could force council members to turn in their season tickets to the California Angels, Los Angeles Rams, Convention Center events and prized Anaheim Stadium parking privileges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997 | BILL BOYARSKY
An election on the downtown Los Angeles arena is a bad idea. It sounds good, an exercise in direct democracy: "Let the people decide." But that's not the way it will work out. Expect the usual incredibly expensive, completely phony California-style initiative campaign, financed by sources whose true identity is revealed only when the final financial reports are filed--after the vote. Anti-arena forces will protest a giveaway to billionaires.
SPORTS
June 24, 1995 | Associated Press
Details of the agreement signed Friday by the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum board of directors and Raider owner Al Davis to return the team to Oakland: * Length: 16 years. Covers 15 football seasons beginning in 1996, with the 1995 season as an additional transition year. * Stadium modernization: $85 million in improvements, including expansion of the Oakland Coliseum to 65,000 seats with 175 luxury suites and new locker rooms.
SPORTS
July 7, 1994 | KENNETH REICH
The Coliseum has ordered a new matrix scoreboard and video board system costing $4.8 million to replace boards that had to be taken down as part of the stadium's $50-million earthquake repair. Project director Don C. Webb told the Coliseum Commission Wednesday that the new boards, to be paid for by the federal and state governments because they are a consequence of the Northridge earthquake, will be an improvement over the former boards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A countywide task force seeking to keep the Los Angeles Rams in Orange County must present a competitive proposal within two months to have a chance of retaining the team, the group's chairman said Tuesday. "Timing is important, and moving forward on a concerted effort is important," sports agent Leigh Steinberg after a task force meeting Tuesday. "We have six weeks to two months to promote a plan."
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