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Sports Franchises Finances

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SPORTS
December 7, 1989 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has become a required nuisance, this business of paying for parking. Roll down the window, extend an arm, drop $3 here, $5 there. But to sports organizations that provide parking, it can amount to millions of dollars in revenue--enough to pay a front office, buy a ballplayer, or in the case of new Angel pitcher Mark Langston, at least make the down payment.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 2001 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of the WNBA's 16 franchises remain unprofitable and attendance at games last year was flat. But the basketball league that tipped off its fifth season over the Memorial Day weekend remains the most visible of women's professional sports leagues. The fact that the WNBA has survived is touted by fans and the league as proof of a market for women's sports, both at the arena and on television.
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SPORTS
March 30, 2000 | By MIKE DiGIOVANNA and BILL SHAIKIN,
The reviews were so gushing back in 1995, you'd swear the Walt Disney Co.'s $140-million purchase of the Angels was going to save a sport ravaged by a nasty labor dispute and revitalize a county devastated by bankruptcy with one swift swing of the bat. "What a shot in the arm for Orange County," said William G. Steiner, county supervisor. "We're as happy as the devil over here," Anaheim City Manager James D. Ruth said.
SPORTS
June 2, 2001 | LARRY STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cynics and conspiracy-theory advocates envision the NBC brass huddling with Jerry Buss in a smoke-filled room. They figure an NBC hotshot might say to the Lakers' owner something like, "Hey, Jerry, we need a favor that can help both you and us. Tell your players and coaches we don't need another sweep. "Because your Lakers swept San Antonio, we lost three games and three big paydays. We could have made $7 million in advertising off each of those three games.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | GEORGE SKELTON
The morning had promise--glassy blue water beckoning through the pines, a sunny deck, a cup of coffee and The Times. Then I picked up the sports section. This was midsummer at Lake Tahoe and three front page articles about football made me want to go back inside and take another shower. One was about the UCLA football players who had abused handicapped parking permits. Clearly, these physically privileged athletes had no sensitivity toward the disabled and only a sense of self.
SPORTS
June 13, 1998
The Kings, who made the playoffs for the first since in five years, have raised ticket prices for the first time in five years. The Kings' 1998-99 average ticket will increase 11%, from $33.87 to $37.62. "The Kings do not take this step lightly," team President Tim Leiweke said. "Our decision is based on two factors; we haven't increased our prices in five years--in fact we reduced them last year--and our player personnel cost is projected to increase nearly 40% this year alone.
SPORTS
April 6, 1998
TEAM PAYROLLS *--* Team Payroll Average Baltimore Orioles $68,988,134 $2,555,116 New York Yankees 63,460,567 2,440,791 Cleveland Indians 59,583,500 2,127,982 Atlanta Braves 59,536,000 2,126,286 Texas Rangers 55,304,595 1,975,164 St.
SPORTS
November 25, 1998 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dodgers, looking for additional sources of income to meet an increasing player payroll, are still considering several options, among them a scaled-down renovation of Dodger Stadium. "We've got to look at different scopes of renovation," team President Bob Graziano said Tuesday. "We really are focusing on enhancing and renovating Dodger Stadium--not tearing it down. But we haven't ruled that out as a possibility. We haven't ruled out any alternative at this point."
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The future of Major League Soccer has nothing to do with whether Marco Etcheverry can curl a shot into the net from 25 yards, Lubos Kubik's ability to execute a sliding tackle or Zach Thornton's acrobatics when making a save. Instead, as with any young league, what happens in the boardroom is far more important than what happens on the field. True, how players perform directly influences how many fans click through the turnstiles and, therefore, how much money piles up on the boardroom tables.
SPORTS
July 3, 1997 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER
Clearly positioning themselves for another move within days, the Clippers on Wednesday waived reserve guard Terry Dehere, a former No. 1 pick, and renounced the rights to reserve center Dwayne Schintzius, a free agent. The transactions clear $1.5 million in cap flexibility for the Clippers--the $2 million Dehere was due for 1997-98 minus a $500,000 buyout.
SPORTS
March 20, 2001 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of the Vancouver Grizzlies is interested in moving his team to Anaheim but has not been persuaded the team can be profitable playing there, a colleague said Monday. Grizzly owner Michael Heisley resumed negotiations Monday with Arrowhead Pond General Manager Tim Ryan and Anaheim City Manager James Ruth, who hope to bring the Grizzlies to Orange County.
SPORTS
March 30, 2000 | By MIKE DiGIOVANNA and BILL SHAIKIN,
The reviews were so gushing back in 1995, you'd swear the Walt Disney Co.'s $140-million purchase of the Angels was going to save a sport ravaged by a nasty labor dispute and revitalize a county devastated by bankruptcy with one swift swing of the bat. "What a shot in the arm for Orange County," said William G. Steiner, county supervisor. "We're as happy as the devil over here," Anaheim City Manager James D. Ruth said.
SPORTS
December 14, 1999 | BILL PLASCHKE
Movie man that he is, Bob Daly will surely understand why this town is confused about what is happening to its baseball team. The new Dodger boss spent his first six weeks producing an action flick. Then Sunday, he turned it into a comedy. Not that Dodger buffs have anything against either genre, but those buying the tickets and the popcorn deserve to know what it's going to be. Are the Dodgers going to try to win now by paying big money to players like Shawn Green and Kevin Brown?
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | GEORGE SKELTON
The morning had promise--glassy blue water beckoning through the pines, a sunny deck, a cup of coffee and The Times. Then I picked up the sports section. This was midsummer at Lake Tahoe and three front page articles about football made me want to go back inside and take another shower. One was about the UCLA football players who had abused handicapped parking permits. Clearly, these physically privileged athletes had no sensitivity toward the disabled and only a sense of self.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wary of backing anything that resembles public financing for professional football, the Coliseum Commission on Monday declined to endorse a complex tax increment proposal presented by the private partners attempting to revive their bid to win a new National Football League franchise for a renovated Exposition Park stadium.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The National Football League's demand that Los Angeles put up more public money to bring a pro football team to the Coliseum is outrageous and should be rejected out of hand. As it will be. There is zero chance that more public money will be put up by any city, county or state agency, beyond the promise of $150 million in state revenue bonds to build parking structures near the Coliseum. But the real question is: What is the league's problem?
SPORTS
August 20, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
NFL owners earned less by buying football teams than they would have in other industries in the 1980s, an economics professor testified in Minneapolis at the antitrust trial brought by eight players. The league argues that it does not enjoy benefits of a monopoly. George Daly of the University of Iowa said research shows that the rate of return to owners of professional football teams based on the value of their franchises was 16% in 1980-89.
SPORTS
January 16, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The New York Yankees were not left with a shortfall because George Steinbrenner and his partners pocketed a reported $100 million in 1988 from a cable-TV contract, a spokesman said. New York Newsday reported that a document on file with the New York secretary of state shows the club borrowed against its November, 1988, contract with Madison Square Garden Productions. The MSG deal is worth an estimated $486 million over 12 years.
SPORTS
June 22, 1999 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is one of Bud Selig's stump speeches. If your team needs help building a new stadium in your town, the commissioner comes in and says, "If there's no new ballpark, baseball will not survive in (your town here)." Selig has delivered much the same speech to civic groups, corporate leaders and politicians across North America, including his own town, Milwaukee, where next season the Brewers will be playing in the new Miller Park.
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