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Sports Franchises

NEWS
May 19, 1995 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co. took another major step into professional sports Thursday, announcing that it has agreed to buy a 25% interest in the California Angels baseball team, with an option to buy the rest later. The deal will eventually give Disney controlling interest in the two major sports franchises in Orange County. Gene and Jackie Autry have said that majority interest in the team will not be sold until after the death of Gene Autry, 87.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
It may not be surprising that two pillars of 1980s-style, high-rolling investment--major league sports teams and movie studios--are declining in value today. But it's fascinating that experts in both sports and entertainment see fresh promise for their businesses in pay-per-view television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1992 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No longer confident of attracting a professional basketball or hockey team, city officials have instructed developers of a proposed $85-million sports arena to look at other options, including plans that would call for a significantly smaller facility. Mayor Daniel H. Young said Tuesday that the city has had recent discussions with the Orange County Arena Partnership and both have talked of possibly scaling down the planned 20,000-seat arena to accommodate other events.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1989 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The entrepreneur who has been leading an effort to entice the Los Angeles Raiders to Sacramento said Monday that he and his partners are asking for an ownership stake in the team. Gregg Lukenbill, owner of the Sacramento Kings basketball franchise and a principal partner in the Sacramento Sports Assn. that has proposed building a football stadium there, said that Raiders' owner Al Davis is resisting that suggestion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1996 | DAVID M. CARTER, David M. Carter, a sports management consultant in Redondo Beach, is the author of "Keeping $core," recently published by Oasis Press
Cities seeking professional sports expansion teams or trying to lure franchises from other cities--or simply trying to keep their current teams--are now required to make enormous financial concessions to these transient teams. By almost all accounts, the economic impact of a sports franchise on a community is negligible.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | By Jon Healey
This post has been corrected, as indicated below. It looks like all pay-TV customers in the greater Los Angeles area will be footing part of the bill for removing Frank McCourt from the owners' box at Dodgers Stadium. With Fox Sports West, Time Warner Cable and local stations all competing for the right to broadcast Dodgers games starting in 2014, the odds are good that the team will be able to extract the kind of multibillion-dollar deal that the Lakers reportedly negotiated with Warner last year.
OPINION
October 11, 1987
American cities and states should mount a massive counter-terrorism campaign. They are constantly being held hostage by the magnates of professional sports franchises. If team owners begin to feel neglected or notice a spot of rust here and there in the stadium, all they need to do is to start to whisper about moving. Local officials will start turning handsprings to make the owner happy. Other cities will start their money machines churning to entice the franchise to their town.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2012 | By Joe Flint
On Monday night, a star-studded lineup that includes Kobe Bryant, Steve Nash, David Beckham and Landon Donovan will gather in El Segundo to celebrate Time Warner Cable's new regional sports channels SportsNet and Deportes, which go live at 7 p.m. It probably won't take too long for Time Warner Cable executives to flip the switch on the channels -- which will carry the Lakers and the Galaxy -- since so far its cable systems are the only ones carrying...
BUSINESS
October 26, 1994 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Is baseball a past-tense national pastime or a low-priced growth stock with a promising recovery in its future? Baseball team owners and players are losing more than revenues and bonuses from cancellation of the World Series--which would have been played this week. Team values have fallen 20% because of the strike, which is more than 2 months old, says Paul J. Much, an evaluator of sports franchises for the Los Angeles investment banking firm Houlihan Lokey Howard & Zukin.
NEWS
December 24, 1993 | MARIA L. LA GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, there wasn't a single ice-skating rink in all of Nevada. Perhaps the busiest skates in these parts belonged to the semi-sequined stars of Nudes on Ice. Hockey fans worth their salt traveled 300 miles to the Forum each winter for the requisite dose of breakaways and body checks.
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