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Sports Franchises

NEWS
December 24, 1993 | MARIA L. LA GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few years ago, there wasn't a single ice-skating rink in all of Nevada. Perhaps the busiest skates in these parts belonged to the semi-sequined stars of Nudes on Ice. Hockey fans worth their salt traveled 300 miles to the Forum each winter for the requisite dose of breakaways and body checks.
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NEWS
May 1, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was on the heels of their first appearance in the Super Bowl that the San Diego Chargers announced in February that their home, Jack Murphy Stadium, would be expanded from 60,000 to 72,000 seats--thus ensuring that the team would remain here until the year 2020.
SPORTS
August 4, 1996 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1836, the year the Alamo fell, a couple of land speculators named John K. Allen and his brother Augustus figured that a low, flat, grassy stretch of land about 50 miles north of Galveston might amount to something more than a breeding ground for mosquitoes. They were right. The place turned out to be Houston, and after a ship channel was dredged to the Gulf of Mexico, it eventually grew to be the fourth-largest city in the United States.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
With the Board of Supervisors poised to vote on a proposal that could clear the way for a sports arena in neighboring Anaheim, Santa Ana officials Tuesday announced the revival of plans to build a similar facility for their own city. Santa Ana's 20,000-seat arena would be built on 17 acres at Edinger Avenue and Lyon Street, near Century High School in an industrial and business park owned by the Santa Fe Pacific Realty Corp. Santa Ana officials said they hope that the private effort to build such an arena would lure new or existing professional sports franchises to the city.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those who would bring professional basketball and hockey teams to Orange County paint a rosy picture of prosperity, projecting a great boost to the local economy generated by the teams and a new indoor sports arena. But many economists say sports franchises and indoor arenas do not necessarily result in an economic boon. "That seems to be a matter of debate that hasn't been resolved yet," said Pepperdine University economist Dean Baim.
SPORTS
May 18, 1997 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They can't see the top of the pecking order, or the middle for that matter, from where they are. But they're on the list, and you have to start someplace. Their teams' names sound more like Saturday morning cartoon villains and comic book superheroes than professional sports franchises. Their organizations aren't exactly steeped in glorious tradition and there are better ways to invest money--or more exciting ways to lose it.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as baseball's pennant races start to simmer and professional footballers grunt their way through summer training camp, an increasingly hot sports topic in Washington is a question of fans' rights. Specifically, where does a couch potato's cherished right to watch the home team on free TV give way to the team's right to make a buck on cable or pay-per-view television?
NEWS
January 21, 1992 | PETER H. KING
Everyone here is full of proud talk that San Jose, the place Dionne Warwick didn't know the way to, is about to be "put on the map"--to be recognized finally as a "major league city." The cause of this great civic breakthrough is a handshake agreement announced last week by Mayor Susan Hammer and Bob Lurie, owner of the San Francisco Giants. It's quite a deal.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
These are interesting times in one of the most successful, government-supported U.S. industries: professional sports. In pro football, the Los Angeles Raiders are moving back to Oakland, whence they came a decade ago, thanks to a local government guarantee of gate receipts to Raiders owner Al Davis and roughly $57 million in improvements to Oakland-Alameda County Stadium that will be financed by tax-exempt bonds.
NEWS
January 18, 1995
Several of today's major professional sports franchises started in other places and had other names.
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