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Sports Franchises

BUSINESS
December 1, 2012 | By Joe Flint and Meg James, Los Angeles Times
The new owners of the Dodgers are expected to get $6-billion-plus for the TV rights to their team's games. That may be a big win for the home team, but consumers won't be doing high-fives once they see their pay-TV bills. The average household already spends about $90 a month for cable or satellite TV, and nearly half of that amount pays for the sports channels packaged into most services. Massive deals for marquee sports franchises like the Dodgers and Lakers are driving those costs even higher.
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SPORTS
August 4, 1996 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1836, the year the Alamo fell, a couple of land speculators named John K. Allen and his brother Augustus figured that a low, flat, grassy stretch of land about 50 miles north of Galveston might amount to something more than a breeding ground for mosquitoes. They were right. The place turned out to be Houston, and after a ship channel was dredged to the Gulf of Mexico, it eventually grew to be the fourth-largest city in the United States.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was on the heels of their first appearance in the Super Bowl that the San Diego Chargers announced in February that their home, Jack Murphy Stadium, would be expanded from 60,000 to 72,000 seats--thus ensuring that the team would remain here until the year 2020.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
With the Board of Supervisors poised to vote on a proposal that could clear the way for a sports arena in neighboring Anaheim, Santa Ana officials Tuesday announced the revival of plans to build a similar facility for their own city. Santa Ana's 20,000-seat arena would be built on 17 acres at Edinger Avenue and Lyon Street, near Century High School in an industrial and business park owned by the Santa Fe Pacific Realty Corp. Santa Ana officials said they hope that the private effort to build such an arena would lure new or existing professional sports franchises to the city.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those who would bring professional basketball and hockey teams to Orange County paint a rosy picture of prosperity, projecting a great boost to the local economy generated by the teams and a new indoor sports arena. But many economists say sports franchises and indoor arenas do not necessarily result in an economic boon. "That seems to be a matter of debate that hasn't been resolved yet," said Pepperdine University economist Dean Baim.
SPORTS
May 18, 1997 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They can't see the top of the pecking order, or the middle for that matter, from where they are. But they're on the list, and you have to start someplace. Their teams' names sound more like Saturday morning cartoon villains and comic book superheroes than professional sports franchises. Their organizations aren't exactly steeped in glorious tradition and there are better ways to invest money--or more exciting ways to lose it.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as baseball's pennant races start to simmer and professional footballers grunt their way through summer training camp, an increasingly hot sports topic in Washington is a question of fans' rights. Specifically, where does a couch potato's cherished right to watch the home team on free TV give way to the team's right to make a buck on cable or pay-per-view television?
SPORTS
March 28, 1989 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
Bruce McNall learned at an early age, when he started collecting and then dealing the ancient coins that so fascinated him, that it takes money to make money and that he had to be willing to gamble a little and trust his instincts a lot if he wanted the best. Too, he has always said that the key to success is having fun, sticking with the ventures that bring personal satisfaction. So far, those philosophies have paid off for him.
NEWS
May 23, 1999 | T.J. SIMERS and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Entertainment mogul Michael Ovitz has produced a razzle-dazzle design for revamping the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and placing much of Exposition Park atop three- to five-story parking garages. The National Football League is expected to endorse the plan this week in Atlanta, although Ovitz and his rival for an expansion franchise, Eli Broad, won't make formal presentations to the league until Monday night--an indication that Broad and his partners are struggling to win a team.
SPORTS
April 14, 1990 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shirley Otto and a few hundred other fans are sitting on wooden bleachers before a Continental Basketball Assn. game between the hometown Islanders and the Rapid City (S.D.) Thrillers. A dozen future Laker Girls--dolled-up 10-year-olds wearing lipstick and leotards--finish their pregame routine. It's tipoff time, and Otto gets ready for the action to begin--off the court. "I don't see him," Otto says, scanning the gym from her courtside seat.
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