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Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2008
More arts and entertainment coverage on the Web. FASHION Red carpet clout Exhibit A: Elle Macpherson. Known simply as "The Body" back in her Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue days, the supermodel wore a black-and-gold beaded halter-neck Gucci gown to an amfAR fundraiser at Cannes. Dressing celebs for such international red carpet events is as important -- or more so -- than one night at the Oscars, say designers such as Dolce & Gabbana. Details, photos at Dish Rag blog at www .latimes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
At 55 years old, she's no spring chicken, but come Feb. 18, Barbie will strike a sexy pose for Sports Illustrated's 50th anniversary swimsuit issue along with famous beauties such as Christie Brinkley, Kathy Ireland, Heidi Klum and Kate Upton.    The appearance will be the Mattel doll's first in the magazine's pages. The toy, a perennial bestseller despite a recent slump in sales, first appeared on shelves in 1959 wearing a black-and-white chevron bathing suit. Barbie's spread in Sports Illustrated, shot by Walter Iooss Jr., will feature 22 dolls.
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OPINION
July 12, 2008
Re "Free speech, public trust," editorial, July 5 The Times' editorial board, having first carefully hidden its copies of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue under a stack of innocuous papers, climbs on its high horse of prudery to declare that any judge who dares enjoy a bit of risque material is unable to consider an obscenity case. By that logic, anybody who has any involvement whatsoever with a given issue, or even knowledge of it, should be barred from deciding anything remotely related to it. Applying the same standard, I can't wait until the next time a religious establishment case comes before the Supreme Court.
AUTOS
February 13, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
It is like having a “booth babe” come out of the print advertisement.  Overseas, Toyota has used a cross-dresser to sex up its advertising. Now the Japanese automaker, known for its conservative cars, is leveraging Sports Illustrated's annual swimsuit issue published Tuesday and smartphone technology to juice up the advertising for its new Lexus IS here in the U.S. In a print ad it calls “Blend Out,” Toyota said it cast three swimsuit models to pose with the Lexus IS and “camouflaged the models within the scene - actually making them part of the set design.” Readers can use smartphones to scan a QR code on the ad so that “when they place their phones on the page, the models come to life, walking out from the background and revealing themselves in their swimsuits.” The QR code triggers a video of the sexy models cavorting next to the new IS. The viewer can slide the phone to the next model in the advertisement and see her dancing, too. It's pretty racy for a brand whose average buyer age is well into the 50s, especially considering that about half of IS sales are to women.
SPORTS
February 24, 1998 | BILL PLASCHKE
What: Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue "Crossing the Line" reads the cover of this year's Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition. And so it does, crossing the line from daring to dumb in 218 tedious pages. For years, Sports Illustrated made news each winter by being one of the only mainstream magazines to show half-naked women. It would include the photos around its regular sports stories, subscribers would chuckle about hiding it under the bed, it was a nice inside joke.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2004 | Robert Abele
On UPN's competition series "America's Next Top Model," supermodel Tyra Banks is partly responsible for bestowing instant cover girl validity on a woman she and a panel of judges believe is worthy of fame and fortune in the glitzy world of beauty sales, runway domination and photographic notoriety. But the show, now in its second hit season, has been a source of newfound legitimacy for the 30-year-old Banks as well, since she's its creator and executive producer. It's part of a long-standing strategy of Banks' -- along with charity work and occasional acting forays -- to be more than just your average Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue and Victoria's Secret catalog icon.
SPORTS
February 15, 2009 | Mike Bianchi, Bianchi is a columnist for the Orlando Sentinel.
He is one of the greatest champions the sport has ever known. He's a doggone, downright dynasty hurtling through the history books at 200 mph. He's the New York Yankees of NASCAR. Except there's one huge difference between the Yankees and Jimmie Johnson: You either love the Yankees or you hate them. Jimmie Johnson is too nice to hate and too uninteresting to love. Johnson finished third in one of the Gatorade Duel 150 qualifying races last week at Daytona, but it doesn't matter what happens here at the beginning of the season when you just know Johnson -- yawn -- will be challenging for the championship at the end of it. With apologies to Ben Franklin: There are three things in this life that are certain: (1)
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
At 55 years old, she's no spring chicken, but come Feb. 18, Barbie will strike a sexy pose for Sports Illustrated's 50th anniversary swimsuit issue along with famous beauties such as Christie Brinkley, Kathy Ireland, Heidi Klum and Kate Upton.    The appearance will be the Mattel doll's first in the magazine's pages. The toy, a perennial bestseller despite a recent slump in sales, first appeared on shelves in 1959 wearing a black-and-white chevron bathing suit. Barbie's spread in Sports Illustrated, shot by Walter Iooss Jr., will feature 22 dolls.
AUTOS
February 13, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
It is like having a “booth babe” come out of the print advertisement.  Overseas, Toyota has used a cross-dresser to sex up its advertising. Now the Japanese automaker, known for its conservative cars, is leveraging Sports Illustrated's annual swimsuit issue published Tuesday and smartphone technology to juice up the advertising for its new Lexus IS here in the U.S. In a print ad it calls “Blend Out,” Toyota said it cast three swimsuit models to pose with the Lexus IS and “camouflaged the models within the scene - actually making them part of the set design.” Readers can use smartphones to scan a QR code on the ad so that “when they place their phones on the page, the models come to life, walking out from the background and revealing themselves in their swimsuits.” The QR code triggers a video of the sexy models cavorting next to the new IS. The viewer can slide the phone to the next model in the advertisement and see her dancing, too. It's pretty racy for a brand whose average buyer age is well into the 50s, especially considering that about half of IS sales are to women.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When the annual swimsuit issue of Sports Illustrated hits the newsstands Wednesday, something besides body covering will be missing. Hyundai--a longtime advertiser--has decided to skip the issue that features revealing photographs of women in skimpy swimsuits. "If this particular issue (of Sports Illustrated) is of concern to some of our customers, we'd prefer to steer away from it," said Joe Corey, national advertising manager at Fountain Valley-based Hyundai Motor America Corp.
SPORTS
February 15, 2009 | Mike Bianchi, Bianchi is a columnist for the Orlando Sentinel.
He is one of the greatest champions the sport has ever known. He's a doggone, downright dynasty hurtling through the history books at 200 mph. He's the New York Yankees of NASCAR. Except there's one huge difference between the Yankees and Jimmie Johnson: You either love the Yankees or you hate them. Jimmie Johnson is too nice to hate and too uninteresting to love. Johnson finished third in one of the Gatorade Duel 150 qualifying races last week at Daytona, but it doesn't matter what happens here at the beginning of the season when you just know Johnson -- yawn -- will be challenging for the championship at the end of it. With apologies to Ben Franklin: There are three things in this life that are certain: (1)
OPINION
July 12, 2008
Re "Free speech, public trust," editorial, July 5 The Times' editorial board, having first carefully hidden its copies of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue under a stack of innocuous papers, climbs on its high horse of prudery to declare that any judge who dares enjoy a bit of risque material is unable to consider an obscenity case. By that logic, anybody who has any involvement whatsoever with a given issue, or even knowledge of it, should be barred from deciding anything remotely related to it. Applying the same standard, I can't wait until the next time a religious establishment case comes before the Supreme Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2008
More arts and entertainment coverage on the Web. FASHION Red carpet clout Exhibit A: Elle Macpherson. Known simply as "The Body" back in her Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue days, the supermodel wore a black-and-gold beaded halter-neck Gucci gown to an amfAR fundraiser at Cannes. Dressing celebs for such international red carpet events is as important -- or more so -- than one night at the Oscars, say designers such as Dolce & Gabbana. Details, photos at Dish Rag blog at www .latimes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2004 | Robert Abele
On UPN's competition series "America's Next Top Model," supermodel Tyra Banks is partly responsible for bestowing instant cover girl validity on a woman she and a panel of judges believe is worthy of fame and fortune in the glitzy world of beauty sales, runway domination and photographic notoriety. But the show, now in its second hit season, has been a source of newfound legitimacy for the 30-year-old Banks as well, since she's its creator and executive producer. It's part of a long-standing strategy of Banks' -- along with charity work and occasional acting forays -- to be more than just your average Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue and Victoria's Secret catalog icon.
SPORTS
February 24, 1998 | BILL PLASCHKE
What: Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue "Crossing the Line" reads the cover of this year's Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition. And so it does, crossing the line from daring to dumb in 218 tedious pages. For years, Sports Illustrated made news each winter by being one of the only mainstream magazines to show half-naked women. It would include the photos around its regular sports stories, subscribers would chuckle about hiding it under the bed, it was a nice inside joke.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When the annual swimsuit issue of Sports Illustrated hits the newsstands Wednesday, something besides body covering will be missing. Hyundai--a longtime advertiser--has decided to skip the issue that features revealing photographs of women in skimpy swimsuits. "If this particular issue (of Sports Illustrated) is of concern to some of our customers, we'd prefer to steer away from it," said Joe Corey, national advertising manager at Fountain Valley-based Hyundai Motor America Corp.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | Greg Johnson / Times staff writer
Suiting Up: The swimsuit issue is out. Make that the swimsuit issues are out. Sports Illustrated's swimsuit issue is at newsstands, as is Surfing Magazine, which has published its 12th annual women's swimwear preview. San Clemente-based Surfing's swimwear issue takes the form of a 16-page insert that includes the requisite photographs as well as a listing of where the suits can be purchased.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Belpre sixth-grader Justin Reyes is serving a three-day suspension because he refused a lesser punishment for bringing the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue to school, school Supt. Tim Swarr said. Belpre Middle School Principal Kathy Garrison cited the 12-year-old for violating policy on nonverbal harassment and possession of lewd or suggestive material. "It's not like it's Playboy, Penthouse, Hustler," said Justin's mother, Nicole Reyes.
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