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HEALTH
January 9, 2006 | Greg Miller, Special to The Times
WHEN Alicia Di Rado Dingsdale tore her hip flexor muscle in a soccer game in 2004, she was determined not to let it hold her back. A week later she ran a 5-kilometer race in Arcadia. "By the time I finished I was crawling," she says. She did physical therapy for a few months and eased back into running -- but not slowly enough. "I had missed running so much I started doing too much," says the 36-year-old.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2013 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
"The right ring finger. ... No, THE LEFT RING FINGER!" It's minutes before sunrise at Westchester's Kerlan-Jobe sports medicine clinic and Johnny Knoxville has very nearly, accidentally, authorized orthopedic surgery on the wrong hand. His uninjured hand. A clinic administrator taking down Knoxville's information shakes her head in disbelief. Within the hour, the co-creator and breakout star of MTV's cultishly beloved series "Jackass" - and a trio of spinoff movies that have a combined gross of more than $335 million - will be under general anesthesia and no longer able to rectify any self-inflicted finger fiascoes.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger and Marc Lifsher
After more than a year of intense lobbying by professional sports leagues, California has slammed the door on most athletes looking to file injury claims in the state, including those with serious brain injuries. Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed legislation that significantly limits workers' compensation claims by pro players. It's a significant victory for the National Football League, which has been trying to reduce its financial exposure to concussions and other brain injuries that former players allege are the result of repeated blows to the head.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | DANIEL AKST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're under 45 and you're reading this with your arm in a sling, your injured leg elevated or with nasty scrapes on your knees and elbows, take heart. You may be hurt, but you're not alone. American baby boomers are apparently beset by a plague of sports injuries. Statistics are scarce but aches and pains, unfortunately, are not. The walking wounded are everywhere. Beverly Markwith, 35, a benefits administrator in Santa Monica, finally quit handball after her fifth knee operation.
NEWS
March 16, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Baseball line drives usually make headlines in two ways -- when they save the game and when they do great harm. This week's headlines fall in the latter category: Atlanta Braves minor league manager Luis Salazar has lost an eye after being hit in the face by a line-drive foul ball last week. Doctors said that Salazar's left eye had to be removed. This Orlando Sentinel story explains: "Salazar, 54, was watching a spring training game between the Braves and St. Louis Cardinals minor league teams when Brian McCann fouled a ball near his team's dugout where Salazar was standing.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
Say hello to another phenomenon of the '80s: sports injuries in children. Today's kids, who used to get their bumps and bruises by riding bikes or roller skates around the neighborhood, are instead sustaining orthopedic injuries that once were the province of adult weekend warriors: overuse injuries caused by too much activity of a single type or over too short a period of time.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2013 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
"The right ring finger. ... No, THE LEFT RING FINGER!" It's minutes before sunrise at Westchester's Kerlan-Jobe sports medicine clinic and Johnny Knoxville has very nearly, accidentally, authorized orthopedic surgery on the wrong hand. His uninjured hand. A clinic administrator taking down Knoxville's information shakes her head in disbelief. Within the hour, the co-creator and breakout star of MTV's cultishly beloved series "Jackass" - and a trio of spinoff movies that have a combined gross of more than $335 million - will be under general anesthesia and no longer able to rectify any self-inflicted finger fiascoes.
SPORTS
January 29, 1994 | MIKE HISERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris Yard, Cal State Northridge's top rebounder and post player, will miss the remainder of the basketball season with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee. Dr. Lestor Cohn, Northridge's team orthopedic specialist, discovered the tear during arthroscopic surgery Friday at Encino Hospital. "It was just what we feared," Cohn said. "That is exactly the type of thing that causes the knee to give out continuously."
TRAVEL
January 11, 1998 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
A winter getaway to the mountains for skiing, snowshoeing, hiking or sledding seems effortless and simple, not to mention fun. But talk to physicians, emergency medical technicians and ski patrol members who work in local mountain communities and it's clear: Dangers lurk, and some can kill. That reality has been demonstrated, tragically, twice in the last month with the skiing deaths of politician/singer Sonny Bono in South Lake Tahoe last week and Michael Kennedy, son of the late Sen. Robert F.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2012 | David Lazarus
It's amazing how easily the smallest healthcare mix-up can spin out of control and leave the patient on the hook for thousands of dollars in medical bills. In Jim Furlan's case, his journey into the healthcare Twilight Zone began in September when his then-15-year-old daughter injured her knee playing in a volleyball tournament in Las Vegas. "She was rushed to the hospital in extreme pain," he recalled the other day. "They had to give her morphine. " The girl then flew home to Manhattan Beach, where her doctor ordered an MRI at Torrance Memorial Medical Center.
SPORTS
December 14, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
The horror stories in pro sports are coming so fast and furious that their significance is being lost in their numbers. It should be the other way around, but it's not. Another concussion. Ho hum. Player A will sit out two games, Player B a month. Page 5. Another league investigation, maybe some fines. Yawn. — After the Oct. 23 game against the New York Jets, San Diego Chargers guard Kris Dielman got on the plane to return home. During the game, he had taken a hit loud enough to be heard on TV. He staggered, looked disoriented and was approached by two concerned game officials.
NEWS
March 16, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Baseball line drives usually make headlines in two ways -- when they save the game and when they do great harm. This week's headlines fall in the latter category: Atlanta Braves minor league manager Luis Salazar has lost an eye after being hit in the face by a line-drive foul ball last week. Doctors said that Salazar's left eye had to be removed. This Orlando Sentinel story explains: "Salazar, 54, was watching a spring training game between the Braves and St. Louis Cardinals minor league teams when Brian McCann fouled a ball near his team's dugout where Salazar was standing.
NEWS
December 13, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Young athletes account for about 4 million injuries a year in the U.S. Of course, playing sports comes with an inherent risk of being hurt. But there are some types of injuries this expert says may be preventable. Brian Grasso, founder and chief executive of the International Youth Conditioning Assn., speaks with Chicago Tribune fitness writer Julie Deardorff during a live Web chat Tuesday at 10 a.m. PST. Join the online discussion to learn about everything from ACL tears to concussions.
OPINION
September 20, 2010
It's her money to spend Re "Record set in gov.'s race," Sept. 16 New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg "bought" his election, spending "$109 million on his 2009 reelection bid. " He is so successful that two years ago he persuaded the City Council to change its term-limits rules. Yet Meg Whitman is criticized for "self-funding" her campaign. Both of these people are putting their money where their mouths are. They owe no one, and can take the credit or the blame for what happens.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | Jeannine Stein
As the kids head back to school they'll also head back to team sports. So brace yourselves, moms and dads, for the injuries that can come with that. A new study sheds some light on which sports are more likely to produce severe injuries, derailing athletic participation for weeks. Injury data on nine sports were collected during the academic year from 2005 through 2007 in 100 high schools nationwide by researchers from the Ohio State University College of Medicine and the Center for Injury Research and Policy in the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, both in Columbus.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | Jeannine Stein
As the kids head back to school they'll also head back to team sports. So brace yourselves, moms and dads, for the injuries that can come with that. A new study sheds some light on which sports are more likely to produce severe injuries, derailing athletic participation for weeks. Injury data on nine sports were collected during the academic year from 2005 through 2007 in 100 high schools nationwide by researchers from the Ohio State University College of Medicine and the Center for Injury Research and Policy in the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, both in Columbus.
HEALTH
May 3, 2004 | John Briley, Special to The Washington Post
The cure-all acronym RICE -- rest, ice, compression and elevation -- is great for ankle sprains. But other ailments require targeted treatment. Here is some guidance from the website www.sportsinjuryhandbook.com. * Muscle pulls: Rest and apply ice (20 minutes on, 20 minutes off) until pain and swelling subside. As soon as tolerable, begin gently stretching the muscle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. James Nicholas, 85, whose pioneering work on sports injuries included four operations on Joe Namath's knees, died Saturday of colon cancer at his home in Scarsdale, N.Y. Nicholas founded the world's first hospital-based center for the treatment and prevention of sports injuries at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan, now known as the Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma. In the 1960s and 1970s, Nicholas was team doctor for the New York Jets, Knicks and Rangers.
HEALTH
January 9, 2006 | Greg Miller, Special to The Times
WHEN Alicia Di Rado Dingsdale tore her hip flexor muscle in a soccer game in 2004, she was determined not to let it hold her back. A week later she ran a 5-kilometer race in Arcadia. "By the time I finished I was crawling," she says. She did physical therapy for a few months and eased back into running -- but not slowly enough. "I had missed running so much I started doing too much," says the 36-year-old.
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