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NEWS
February 1, 1993 | BILL DWYRE
The Freedom Forum, a nonpartisan international organization funded by a Gannett Foundation, announced Sunday that it has awarded a $75,000 grant to the Associated Press Sports Editors for use in fostering more minority participation in sports journalism. The award, announced at a brunch by Freedom Forum Chairman Allen H.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
Journalist Willow Bay has been named director of the journalism school at USC's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, the university announced Wednesday. Bay, 50, is  a senior editor at the Huffington Post and a s pecial correspondent and host for Bloomberg TV . She also has been a producer, author and  television news anchor, and is married to Bob Iger, chairman and chief executive of Walt Disney Co. “The breadth of Willow Bay's experiences, skills and talents is extraordinary,” said Ernest James Wilson III, dean of the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, in a statement.  “Her leadership will help our innovative school aggressively continue our path of creating -- and defining -- the digital future.” ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Bay has co-anchored ABC's "Good Morning America/Sunday" and CNN's "Moneyline News Hour," and was the lead writer and producer of CNN's weekend news program "Pinnacle.
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SPORTS
June 26, 1993 | BILL DWYRE
Tom McEwen, longtime sports editor and sports columnist of the Tampa Tribune, won the 13th Red Smith Award on Friday. The award is presented annually by the Associated Press Sports Editors for outstanding contributions to sports journalism.
SPORTS
August 12, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
Albert Pujols needs to come through in the clutch, and we're not talking home runs or RBIs here. Pujols needs to pursue his lawsuit against Jack Clark. Call it slander. Call it defamation of character. But don't call it off. Last week, Pujols was accused by Clark, on a radio show in St. Louis, of having been a juicer, of taking performance-enhancing drugs during a major league career that has already included three most-valuable-player awards and will, barring shocking proof that Clark was accurate, be celebrated with first-ballot inclusion in the Hall of Fame.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Van F. McKenzie, 61, associate managing editor for sports at the Orlando Sentinel and an influential figure in sports journalism, died Friday at his home in Heathrow, Fla., after a three-year battle with cancer. The son of a well driller and miner from Ohio, McKenzie began his career with the Ocala (Fla.) Star-Banner in 1963 and became sports editor at age 17. He went on to lead sports departments of the Sentinel -- twice -- Cocoa Today (now Florida Today), St.
SPORTS
January 11, 2003 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Will McDonough, a Boston Globe sportswriter and columnist for 40 years, died late Thursday at his home in the Boston suburb of Hingham, Mass. He was 67. Best known nationally for his work on two network NFL pregame shows, McDonough had a mild heart attack early last month, followed by angioplasty -- a procedure to open clogged blood vessels. He also had suffered a mild heart attack in 1990 and had battled thyroid cancer in the late 1990s.
OPINION
December 7, 2002
Sports journalism could go a long way toward expanding the fan base for women's sports merely by giving those athletes and sports the coverage they deserve ("Women's Sports Still Looking for an Audience," Dec. 3). However, sports journalism is overwhelmingly dominated by men. To adequately cover women's sports in daily papers and local television networks would be to invite many more women to become sports reporters, editors, announcers, producers and pundits. Precisely because women can do those jobs every bit as well as their male counterparts, the guys at the sports desk are unlikely to extend those invitations any time soon.
SPORTS
June 27, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Eddie Storin, who for 40 years ran the sports department of the Miami Herald, was awarded the 12th annual Red Smith Award at the Associated Press Sports Editors convention in San Francisco. The award is given for contributions to sports journalism. Upon receiving his award, Storin said: "I had one primary goal in all my years in the business, and that was to get people to stop saying, 'You can't believe what you read in newspapers.' "
SPORTS
December 21, 1991
KCBS not renewing Keith Olbermann's contract is a sad day for Los Angeles sports journalism. While other stations mainly show highlights, Keith's unique sportscasts will surely be missed. While they may find someone who looks nicer in a suit, they will not be able to replace his knowledge, wit, broad views, independence or sarcasm, all of which I have thoroughly enjoyed. BILL NOYES Diamond Bar
SPORTS
March 9, 1991
Bob Oates' recent football kicking column had a couple of the most inaccurate paragraphs in the history of sports journalism. Gridiron football derives from rugby football, not association football (soccer). When football was first played in the U.S. in 1869-70 (Princeton, Rutgers and Columbia), they were running with the football, not kicking it as in soccer. As a great writer wrote, he could look it up. ALFRED L. GINEPRA Past President, Southern California Rugby Football Union
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Robert Abele
There is a pulsating timeliness to "The Crash Reel," Academy Award-winning documentarian Lucy Walker's bracing new film about extreme-sports up-and-comer Kevin Pearce, a gifted snowboarder who wiped out while training for the 2010 Olympics, suffering a coma-inducing traumatic brain injury. A miraculous recovery gave his loving, nurturing family back its son, but Pearce's thirst to re-enter an increasingly dangerous world of stunt-driven one-upmanship sparks in those close to him a new course of worry.
SPORTS
December 5, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
Rankman and SportsBusiness Journal have teamed up for a first-they-have-heard-about-it collaboration based on SBJ's seventh annual analysis of bowl gifts provided to players. This year's most popular gift is the Fossil watch, provided at 19 of the 35 bowls. USC is too lousy at 7-5 to crack Rankman's top 25, but part of the Trojans' Sun Bowl gift package will include a Helen of Troy hair dryer. Meineke Car Care participants from Minnesota and Texas Tech will receive a 32-inch flat screen, a belt buckle, T-shirt, lapel pin and backpack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Chris Economaki, a journalist long regarded as the authoritative voice in motor sports, died Friday. He was 91. National Speed Sport News, which Economaki edited and published for more than 60 years, announced his death but gave no details. Economaki, who was often called the "dean of American motor sports journalism," worked in television for more than 30 years with stints at ABC, CBS and ESPN. He was part of ABC's first telecast from Daytona International Speedway in 1961, then became a pit reporter and commentator for the network's "Wide World of Sports" until 1983.
SPORTS
July 16, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
The "Granddaddy of Them All" has hit the mother lode. ESPN has agreed to pay an average of $80 million a year to broadcast the Rose Bowl game from 2015 through 2026, Sports Business Journal first reported. That's an increase of 167% from the current deal, which pays $30 million annually. "The Rose Bowl Game is one of sport's most meaningful and celebrated events," John Skipper, ESPN president, said in a written statement. "Extending our relationship long term with such a prestigious brand will play a significant role in the way fans continue to define ESPN — as the leading destination for college football all year long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2008 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
When the men of America went off to fight in World War II, the sports editor at the Twin City Sentinel in Winston-Salem, N.C., went with them. Mary Garber, a sports fan growing up, stepped in and took his place. When he returned from the war, he reclaimed his job and Garber returned to her pre-war assignment on the society pages. But she wasn't done with sports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Van F. McKenzie, 61, associate managing editor for sports at the Orlando Sentinel and an influential figure in sports journalism, died Friday at his home in Heathrow, Fla., after a three-year battle with cancer. The son of a well driller and miner from Ohio, McKenzie began his career with the Ocala (Fla.) Star-Banner in 1963 and became sports editor at age 17. He went on to lead sports departments of the Sentinel -- twice -- Cocoa Today (now Florida Today), St.
SPORTS
August 17, 1996
Hey, Fred Claire, I keep reading where the Dodgers have to get a third baseman. On the other hand, at second base, there we've got a proven commodity. One who is DeVoid of DeHit, DeVoid of DeField, but not DeVoid of DeMouth. DeDefense and DeErrors speak for themselves. What are you afraid of, Fred? That DeDe will talk about you the same way he did Tommy? KEN CHURCH Los Angeles Regarding Bill Plaschke's column of Aug. 6 ["Padres Still Don't Know How West Is Won"]: Please file under "More Dodger Drivel" at the public library.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Robert Abele
There is a pulsating timeliness to "The Crash Reel," Academy Award-winning documentarian Lucy Walker's bracing new film about extreme-sports up-and-comer Kevin Pearce, a gifted snowboarder who wiped out while training for the 2010 Olympics, suffering a coma-inducing traumatic brain injury. A miraculous recovery gave his loving, nurturing family back its son, but Pearce's thirst to re-enter an increasingly dangerous world of stunt-driven one-upmanship sparks in those close to him a new course of worry.
MAGAZINE
February 1, 2004
The article "Picking Nits With Frank Deford" (by Glenn F. Bunting, Jan. 11) is baffling to all who know Deford's work. To indict him for using "breathtaking overstatement to portray athletes and their accomplishments" is miles off point for a journalist who, for more than four decades, has been touching readers with wondrous prose and clear insight. Bunting's story was approximately 7,000 words; what a small piece for such a great newspaper. Shame on you. Terry McDonell Managing Editor Sports Illustrated New York Taking Deford to task for his occasional bouts of hyperbole is absurd.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 2004 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times staff writer Glenn F. Bunting last wrote for the magazine about televangelist Dr. Gene Scott.
I am warming up at Rancho Park's driving range in July 2002 when the old instructor approaches. He is wearing a beige Gilligan's hat pulled down to his eyebrows and quietly observes me hitting balls off a faded green mat. "When did you start playing?" he asks. As a teenager, I reply. "How often do you practice?" Not enough. "What is your occupation?" Investigative reporter. He pauses a moment, then gently inquires, "Do you know Frank Deford?" Of course. "Are you familiar with his work?"
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