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SPORTS
February 10, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter and Melissa Rohlin
Lauren Lappin's resume is deep: two Olympic teams, two World Cup championships, a Pan American Games title and three times an all-conference selection in college. A Major League Baseball player with similar accomplishments would travel in comfort and bank well into seven or eight figures annually. Lappin, who plays professional softball, takes long road trips on steamy buses and draws a salary just above minimum wage. "It is very frustrating to think every woman on the four teams in the league would be making millions of dollars if we were male," Lappin says.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
So Donald Sterling, owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, stands accused of having made remarks of unbelievable crassness and flavored with a racism that would bring a tear to the eye of Cliven Bundy. Are you surprised? Me neither. Sterling's record of difficulty with racial issues is well-documented, including two lawsuits (one from the federal government) alleging racially discriminatory rental practices at his real estate properties. He settled both for millions. Then there was the lawsuit from long-term Clippers general manager Elgin Baylor accusing Sterling of racial and age discrimination ; Baylor lost his case in a 2011 jury trial.
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NEWS
February 23, 1992
The City Council voted to give $10,000 each to the Azusa National and American little leagues and to Junior All-American Football. Mayor Eugene Moses initiated the motion after hearing a request from the National League president for money for field improvements. Representatives of the other groups did not specify a use, but Moses said it would help make up for losses because some parents can't afford Little League fees during the recession. The requests were sparked by a $3,000 allocation Jan.
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Gary Klein
The ball teetered on the lip of the 16th hole at Augusta National Golf Club. It was 2005, and after Tiger Woods' now-famous chip shot fell in for a birdie and Woods went on to win the Masters for the fourth time, Jim Michaelian made a decision. With Woods' popularity and Tiger-driven television ratings soaring, Michaelian was convinced that the annual Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach should not be run on the same day that the winner of a golf major was being fitted for a green jacket.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1996 | ED BOND
Basketball and soccer for younger children could spring up on Blythe Street--a neighborhood with a crime-ridden image--depending at least in part on how many cars a group of teenagers can wash Saturday. "As soon as we raise enough money we're going to start," said Albert Melena, advisor for the Blythe Street Prevention Program, run by the San Fernando Valley Partnership. "We're trying to raise about $1,000."
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
One would think that we've learned from bitter experience not to trust a word uttered by our major professional sports leagues. Yet here they are trying to put another howler over on us. This is their assertion that retired pro athletes - many of them from outside the state - are ripping off California's workers' compensation system for hundreds of millions of dollars. The state Legislature is setting itself up to swallow this one whole: A bill to close this supposed loophole has been introduced by Assembly Insurance Committee Chairman Henry Perea (D-Fresno)
BUSINESS
November 15, 1989 | From Reuters
Several senators and congressmen said Tuesday that they would take action if too many major sports events went from broadcast to cable or pay television, but two league commissioners promised that free telecasts would continue. "The lure of big bucks may well prompt sports leagues and teams to completely bypass free TV, writing off those people who can't afford cable or can't get it," Sen. Howard Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) said at a Judiciary Committee hearing on sports television.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state attorney general's office Thursday began an audit of Montebello's largest and oldest youth sports league amid allegations by a group of parents and coaches of mismanagement of funds. The audit of the Montebello Baseball Assn. resulted after parents complained and because the nonprofit association failed to file required financial statements from 1986 to 1990 with the state attorney general, the Internal Revenue Service and the state Franchise Tax Board.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of shamefaced boys huddled quietly in the middle of Bassett Park. They knew they were in trouble. They couldn't get away. And they were going to hear about it from an angry adult in authority. "No one paid attention. No one wanted to win. No one was doing their job right," said Shawn Davis, volunteer coach of the Bassett Oilers, as he scolded the team of 12-year-olds that had been humiliated, 22-8, that recent night in a flag football match.
SPORTS
October 21, 2006 | Greg Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Within hours of last Saturday's brawl between the University of Miami and Florida International University, dozens of football players were suspended and a TV analyst -- Lamar Thomas, a former Miami player who seemed to condone the violence -- lost his job. Thomas had boasted to viewers that "you can't come over to our place talking noise like that [or] you'll get your butt beat." Comcast Sports SouthEast edited out his inflammatory remarks before rebroadcasting the game.
SPORTS
March 2, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
Lights, camera, action! It's time for some arbitration hardball. Attorneys representing four private schools and the CIF Southern Section will gather Tuesday and Wednesday to present their arguments as part of a binding arbitration hearing to determine whether Ventura St. Bonaventure, Westlake Village Oaks Christian, La Verne Damien and Glendora St. Lucy's will have to switch sports leagues in the fall. It's similar to one of those Major League Baseball arbitration hearings, in which the team and the player each submit a contract figure and the arbitrator chooses one. In this case, each school will present its arguments, the Southern Section will present its response and the arbitrator will make a decision within a week.
SPORTS
February 10, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter and Melissa Rohlin
Lauren Lappin's resume is deep: two Olympic teams, two World Cup championships, a Pan American Games title and three times an all-conference selection in college. A Major League Baseball player with similar accomplishments would travel in comfort and bank well into seven or eight figures annually. Lappin, who plays professional softball, takes long road trips on steamy buses and draws a salary just above minimum wage. "It is very frustrating to think every woman on the four teams in the league would be making millions of dollars if we were male," Lappin says.
NATIONAL
February 9, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Three months before the NFL draft, star Missouri football player Michael Sam has publicly come out as gay, raising the possibility that the league may soon have its first openly gay player. In interviews published Sunday, Sam -- the 2013 SEC defensive player of the year -- said he came out to University of Missouri teammates last year and  decided to go public now so he could tell his story his own way. "I am an openly, proud, gay man," Sam, 24,  told ESPN , adding: "I understand how big this is. It's a big deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The Federal Communications Commission wants to eliminate its almost 40-year-old sports blackout rules, which serve primarily to prevent NFL games being televised in markets where the home team failed to sell out the stadium. In a notice of proposed rule-making released Wednesday, the FCC said the sports marketplace has "changed dramatically" and that the "economic rationale underlying the sports blackout rules may no longer be valid. " Adapted in 1975, the blackout rules were designed to prevent pay-TV distributors, including cable and satellite operators, from circumventing agreements between sports leagues and television rights holders regarding the blacking out of games that were not sold out. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll For example, if a San Diego Chargers didn't sell out a few days before kickoff and thus the broadcaster with the rights to show the game couldn't, the FCC's rule prohibits a pay-TV distributor from importing the signal of the game from elsewhere and showing it there.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Last week, the Federal Communications Commission made news when it said it was reviewing the 40-year-old sports blackout rules. But there is a lot of confusion out there about what exactly the blackout rule is, how it works and what its removal would mean for both fans and the media. In a nutshell, for decades TV deals between sports leagues and their broadcast rights holders have contained clauses that prohibit them from showing a sporting event if the game is not sold out. For example, if the San Diego Chargers did not sell out, then the game could not be shown on local TV in the San Diego area.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Acting Federal Communications Commission Chairwoman Mignon Clyburn is not taking it easy during her final days as head of the regulatory agency. On Friday, Clyburn circulated a proposal to do away with the 40-year-old sports blackout rules, which allow the National Football League to blackout television coverage of games in a team's home market if it isn't sold out within 72 hours of kickoff. “Changes in the marketplace have raised questions about whether these rules are still in the public interest, particularly at a time when high ticket prices and the economy make it difficult for many sports fans to attend games," Clyburn said in a statement.
SPORTS
March 2, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
Lights, camera, action! It's time for some arbitration hardball. Attorneys representing four private schools and the CIF Southern Section will gather Tuesday and Wednesday to present their arguments as part of a binding arbitration hearing to determine whether Ventura St. Bonaventure, Westlake Village Oaks Christian, La Verne Damien and Glendora St. Lucy's will have to switch sports leagues in the fall. It's similar to one of those Major League Baseball arbitration hearings, in which the team and the player each submit a contract figure and the arbitrator chooses one. In this case, each school will present its arguments, the Southern Section will present its response and the arbitrator will make a decision within a week.
SPORTS
April 12, 2013 | Helene Elliott
Maybe it really is as simple as it sounds. That for the NHL and its players, establishing a partnership with the You Can Play project — which fights homophobia and advocates for the inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual athletes in sports — was born of fairness and logic and isn't really a big deal. "In talking to the guys and all the rest of it, I think the basic feeling was this is the right thing to do, so we oughta go do it. And that's the motivation," Donald Fehr, executive director of the NHL Players' Assn., said Thursday.
NEWS
October 26, 2013 | By Kari Howard
I've just finished reading “Headline Happy,” a 1950 memoir of L.A. Confidential-style journalism by the wonderfully named Florabel Muir. She's a real-world Hildy Johnson (as played by Rosalind Russell in my favorite newspaper movie, “His Girl Friday”). When reading her wisecracking memories of the Hollywood-and-hoodlums beat, I was torn between wishing the journalism racket was still so glam and squirming over the ethics-schmethics of old-school reporting. The book had me from the first page: “The newspaper game!
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger and Marc Lifsher
After more than a year of intense lobbying by professional sports leagues, California has slammed the door on most athletes looking to file injury claims in the state, including those with serious brain injuries. Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed legislation that significantly limits workers' compensation claims by pro players. It's a significant victory for the National Football League, which has been trying to reduce its financial exposure to concussions and other brain injuries that former players allege are the result of repeated blows to the head.
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