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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2008 | Associated Press
Dr. C. Harmon Brown, considered a pioneer in the fields of sports science and medicine, died of cancer Tuesday at his home in San Mateo, Calif., USA Track & Field said in a news release. He was 78. Brown, a professor at UC San Francisco, was a longtime member of the medical and anti-doping commission of the International Assn. of Athletics Federations before stepping down last year. Trained as an endocrinologist, his lifelong passion was track and field.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 18, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
The NBA's top players can be divided into three categories at next month's All-Star game: The West, the East and the creased. Several stars will be wearing freshly pressed suits as the result of injuries that have seemingly left no roster untouched. Derrick Rose, Brook Lopez and Al Horford have been sidelined for the rest of the season, and Chris Paul, Russell Westbrook and Kobe Bryant all hope to return within the next month. Dr. Riley J. Williams III, medical director for the Brooklyn Nets and sports medicine surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York (not to mention a lifelong Lakers fan who played football at Loyola High in Los Angeles)
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NEWS
June 14, 1999
Bruno Balke, 92, a professor of kinesiology and physiology who was considered to be a founding father of sports medicine. Born in Germany, Balke was educated at the University of Berlin, where he received his doctorate in medicine and taught there from 1937 to 1942. He contracted infectious hepatitis while serving with the German Army on the Russian Front during World War II and was transferred to the School of Mountain Rescue in the Tirol.
HEALTH
June 29, 2013 | Chris Woolston
An athlete crumples to the ground untouched, yelling in pain and grabbing her knee. It's a scene that plays out daily on soccer fields, basketball courts and volleyball courts. In 2011, Maddie Tantillo, a 29-year-old semi-pro soccer player for the San Diego Sea Lions, was making a move she'd made countless times before -- planting with her left leg before running right -- when her left knee buckled. "Everyone said I'd be fine," but an MRI showed otherwise. "I had torn my ACL. " The ACL -- the anterior cruciate ligament that connects the kneecap to the tibia -- tears remarkably easily.
NEWS
April 19, 1996
Dr. Ronald Boyce Mackenzie, epidemiologist and sports medicine expert who was former director of the National Athletic Health Institute at Centinela Hospital, has died. He was 71. Mackenzie died Monday of prostate cancer at his Palm Desert home. Working with athletes in the 1970s, Mackenzie served as a physician to individual professional golfers and to several Southern California professional sports teams including the Dodgers, Kings, Lakers and Rams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1993 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Mighty Ducks hockey team enhancing Anaheim's position as a professional sports center, one of the nation's premier sports medicine facilities has decided to open a clinic in the city. The Kerlan-Jobe Orthopedics Clinic, which counts the Los Angeles Rams, California Angels, Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Dodgers and Los Angeles Kings among its clients, will open an office near the Anaheim Arena by the end of the year, a spokesman for the clinic said last week.
REAL ESTATE
July 14, 1985
A $1.7-million, 17,000-square-foot sports medicine facility, designed to be the therapy and rehabilitation center for Inland Empire colleges, high schools and the U. S. Karate and Water Ski teams, has opened in Riverside at 4444 Magnolia Ave. Known as the Community Orthopedic Medical Group of Riverside Inc. and SPORT (Sports Physiology and Orthopedic Rehabilitation Therapy) Clinic, the 17,000-square-foot facility was built by CPE Engineers of Irvine. Renovation Under Way A $6.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1991 | Andy Marx
Among the seemingly endless list of credits that roll by at the end of TriStar's "Bugsy": "Special thanks to Dr. Leroy Perry Jr., the International Sports Medicine Institute." Just what did Dr. Perry--considered one of the world's foremost sports trainers and a pioneer in the field of sports injuries--have to do with "'Bugsy," a film whose only sport is fistfights and mob murders? According to Perry, his contribution was making sure Beatty had the proper "look" for his role as the mobster.
SPORTS
May 6, 1989 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
As one ventures into the Biomechanics Research Laboratory of the Centinela Hospital Medical Center, it might appear as if time has been advanced. This isn't a motion-picture version of a laboratory with foul-smelling potions and curious test tubes. Yet, the sight of Dodger pitcher Orel Hershiser making a delivery with wires attached to his body would lead one to believe that truth is stranger than science fiction. The Biomechanics Research Laboratory is a think tank for sports medicine, and Centinela is a leader in the field.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The circumstances were uncanny. They were 6-foot-7 basketball players. They were 23 years old. They wore No. 44. They collapsed during games and died five days apart. Victims of heart problems. Tony Penny, formerly a Central Connecticut State player, died Feb. 27 in a Manchester, England, hospital after collapsing during a game. But the similarities to the death of Loyola Marymount's Hank Gathers don't end there.
SPORTS
May 30, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
Dr. Lewis Yocum didn't work for the Dodgers in an official capacity, but the team's medical staff felt as if it lost one of its own this week when the Angels announced that the famed orthopedic surgeon had passed away . Yocum worked for the Angels for the last 36 years , but the Dodgers frequently solicited his opinion on medical matters. Dodgers team physician Dr. Neal ElAttrache was a colleague of the famed surgeon at the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic. “We would oftentimes help each other,” ElAttrache said.
HEALTH
May 25, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
"Prolonged sitting is not what nature intended for us," says Dr. Camelia Davtyan, clinical professor of medicine and director of women's health at the UCLA Comprehensive Health Program. "The chair is out to kill us," says James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. Most of us have years of sitting experience, consider ourselves quite good at it and would swear that nature intended us to do it as much as possible. PHOTOS: 17 ways to fight the inertia, step by step But unfortunately, a good deal of data suggest that we're off our rockers to spend so much time on our rockers - as well as the vast variety of other seats where we're fond of parking our duffs.
HEALTH
November 3, 2012 | Chris Woolston
Anywhere someone is lifting a weight, strapping on a football helmet or lacing up running shoes, there's probably a big bottle of green, blue or neon orange liquid nearby. Gatorade, Powerade and other sports drinks have drenched just about every sport in America, from triathlons to pee-wee soccer. But sports drinks are also popular with spectators in the stands, kids playing video games, long haul truckers and office workers. Lots of people chug down sports drinks without ever breaking a sweat.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Laryngitis might once have been the worst injury a cheerleader faced. But cheerleading has become a full-on competitive sport of its own, with injuries to match. The American Academy of Pediatrics on Monday issued a policy statement to try to ensure that participants - 3.6 million kids ages 6 and older -- get the same care as quarterbacks and pitchers. “Cheerleading has become extremely competitive in the past few years, incorporating more complex skills than ever before,” said Cynthia LaBella, a pediatric sports medicine specialist and member of the academy's council on Sports Medicine and Fitness, in a statement issued at the academy's conference in New Orleans.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Nick Owchar
If your children aren't back to school already, they're probably pretty close, and dreading it as much as you're anticipating quiet mornings once they're in the classroom again. The back-to-school flood of books started midsummer with various titles on keys to student success, the virtues of home schooling, and true tales of classroom adversity and fighting school bureaucracy. But what grabbed my attention this year weren't the books about the educational side: The titles about the sports side of our children's school careers -- and keeping them safe on the field -- had me a little anxious.
NEWS
February 18, 2012 | Patt Morrison
The Dodgers' pitchers and catchers will show up at Camelback Ranch in Arizona in a few days for spring training. And so will Sue Falsone. She won't be in the stands; she'll be in the dugout and the clubhouse, with the guys. She's the Dodgers' new head athletic trainer and physical therapist - and she is the first woman to become head trainer in any of the four major professional sports. This Buffalo gal has taken a career lap around the country, from her native upstate New York to a master's degree at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, to the boys of summer's spring training turf in Arizona, and a previous stint at Dodger Stadium, where she was first hired as an assistant trainer for the team in 2007.
HEALTH
May 25, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
"Prolonged sitting is not what nature intended for us," says Dr. Camelia Davtyan, clinical professor of medicine and director of women's health at the UCLA Comprehensive Health Program. "The chair is out to kill us," says James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. Most of us have years of sitting experience, consider ourselves quite good at it and would swear that nature intended us to do it as much as possible. PHOTOS: 17 ways to fight the inertia, step by step But unfortunately, a good deal of data suggest that we're off our rockers to spend so much time on our rockers - as well as the vast variety of other seats where we're fond of parking our duffs.
SPORTS
April 26, 1990
Dr. John A. Lombardo has been appointed the NFL's first steroid adviser, Commissioner Paul Tagliabue announced. Lombardo heads the sports medicine section of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation.
NEWS
November 28, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Matt Leinart caught an unlucky break during a 20-13 win against the Jacksonville Jaguars on Sunday. The Texans quarterback had been playing a strong game when he was slammed by a hard tackle. Although X-rays at the time were inconclusive, Leinart appeared to have a broken collarbone and may have to sit out the rest of the season. Injuries to the collarbone, or clavicle, are not uncommon on the gridiron. The number of neck injuries from playing football is relatively higher than those in other high-contact sports, according to a 2005 study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
NEWS
September 23, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick says he's ready to play against the New York Giants on Sunday, a week after sustaining a concussion while playing the Falcons last Sunday in Atlanta. Vick missed practice on Wednesday but was checked out by a neurosurgeon and allowed to resume practice and playing.   According to Eagles coach Andy Reid, Vick has shown no ill effects of the concussion in the ensuing practice sessions. "I'll tell you, he's been sharp," he said, according to Associated Press.
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