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SPORTS
September 23, 2007 | Kurt Streeter
Depending upon the will of the people, the baseball might go untouched, or it might get blemished with a big, fat asterisk. Then again, it just might be strapped onto the back of a rocket and launched into the ether. A deep drive, hit to heaven. Talk about a tape-measure home run. The orb in question is the baseball that Barry Bonds famously launched into the bleachers during a Giants game last month in San Francisco. This was no hum-drum hit, and this is no everyday ball.
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SPORTS
August 22, 2007 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
So this is what the Angels' lineup looks like with a legitimate power hitter batting behind Vladimir Guerrero. One game does not a season make, but oh, what a game it was. Cleanup hitter Garret Anderson broke out of a power slump in a huge way Tuesday night, knocking in a franchise-record 10 runs to lead the Angels to an 18-9 thumping of the New York Yankees in Angel Stadium.
SPORTS
August 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Fifty for Federer. Top-ranked Roger Federer reached another measure of tennis greatness Sunday, winning his 50th tournament title by beating James Blake, 6-1, 6-4, in the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters at Mason, Ohio. The 26-year-old Swiss star became the fifth-youngest player in history to reach 50, and only the ninth overall in the Open era -- since 1968 -- to win so many tournaments.
SPORTS
August 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
ATLANTA -- Hank Aaron's team paid tribute to baseball's new home-run king Tuesday night, but Aaron wasn't at Turner Field to congratulate Barry Bonds in person. Before the opener of a three-game series against the San Francisco Giants, the Atlanta Braves replayed the videotaped message from Aaron that was shown in San Francisco last week after Bonds hit his 756th homer. Aaron, a senior vice president with the Braves, was not at the game.
SPORTS
August 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
PITTSBURGH -- Put this down as one of the unexpected moments of Barry Bonds' historic season: a standing ovation in Pittsburgh, the town that once booed him mercilessly because of his playoff failures. Bonds, possibly playing his final game in his former home city, singled in three at-bats as the Giants lost the first game of a makeup doubleheader to the Pirates, 3-1, Monday.
SPORTS
August 9, 2007 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- The nation's No. 1 baseball fan, President Bush, waited until Wednesday afternoon to call Barry Bonds to congratulate him on surpassing the sport's career home run record Tuesday night. The delay prompted speculation that Bush, a former owner of the Texas Rangers and a known baseball "purist," was sending a signal of disapproval of the San Francisco slugger, who is widely reputed to have used steroids over the years as he racked up one homer after another.
SPORTS
August 8, 2007 | ROSS NEWHAN
The numbers that bombard my brain now that the King of Cheats has become the new Sultan of Swat are not 7-5-6. The numbers I can't shake have nothing to do with Barry Bonds' home run total and everything to do with it. These numbers are a measurement of the Body by BALCO that has enabled Bonds to hit 345 home runs since turning 35 in 1999, when personal trainer Greg Anderson began pumping him with the steroidal substances known innocuously as the clear and the cream.
SPORTS
August 8, 2007 | Steve Springer and Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writers
SAN FRANCISCO -- The ball exploded off Barry Bonds' bat, a small white sphere streaking through the dark San Francisco sky, headed for the right-center field seats and a hallowed place in baseball history. It was 8:51 Tuesday, a night no one in the sellout crowd of 43,154 at AT&T Park would ever forget, a night to be lived and relived by word of mouth, digital camera and endless reels of highlight tape.
SPORTS
August 8, 2007 | Bill Shaikin, ON BASEBALL
SAN FRANCISCO -- For Hank Aaron, that's 755 home runs, and one save. Bless him. Baseball did not deserve his grace. On this night, Aaron saved the game he loved. Never has an athlete served as a better role model than Aaron did Tuesday, 32 years into retirement. He acted selflessly, with dignity and nobility, demonstrating to the commissioner and to all the world one can put aside personal feelings for the greater good. It might not rub off on Bud Selig, but it rubbed off on Barry Bonds.
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