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SPORTS
August 21, 2000 | DIANE PUCIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you watch the women's gymnastics competition at the 2000 Olympics, there will be a surprise. Actual women. Women with curves, with hips and breasts. Women taller than 5 feet and heavier than a piece of cotton. Women who are stronger but not as flexible, women who can vault higher but might not be able to do so many back somersaults on the balance beam. After the 1996 Olympics, the International Federation of Gymnastics (FIG) instituted age requirements.
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SPORTS
January 7, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
The 16-year era of the Bowl Championship Series ended Monday night in the Rose Bowl. There were fireworks and a trophy presentation and then someone turned out the lights on a colorful, and controversial, chapter of college football. The Rose Bowl hosted two games this season, the Rose Bowl and the BCS title game, but those days are over. Next year, the four-team College Football Playoff replaces the BCS system. Here's how it will work: Instead of using a standing formula to determine the top two teams, a 13-member committee will select and seed the top four teams.
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SPORTS
January 16, 1988 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, Times Staff Writer
Matt Dryke, one of the world's best international skeet shooters, likes to extol the virtues of his sport. "I've always told people it's a lot better than other sports where you have judges because you can tell whether you hit or miss." Dryke, who has hit many more clay birds than he has missed in more than a decade of competition, may change that philosophy after losing his first major international title in two years.
SPORTS
September 29, 2013 | HELENE ELLIOTT
A year ago, the NHL was a few weeks into the third labor stoppage of Commissioner Gary Bettman's reign and fans vowed they would never come back. Now, it's all sunshine and blue skies for the league and a firmly entrenched Bettman. A settlement in January that guaranteed labor peace for at least eight years -- and possibly 10 -- kick-started an intense, 48-game schedule. The 30 teams played to a cumulative 97% of capacity, with 16 teams selling out all 24 home games and 10 more playing to 90% or more of their arena capacity.
SPORTS
July 29, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Karyn Marshall, former world champion and current national champion in her sport, says the biggest obstacle she faces in competition is that she thinks too much. Marshall is a weightlifter. Probably most people have images of weightlifters that would exclude the possibility of thinking too much, but Marshall is a happy exception. A stockbroker and financial analyst on Wall Street, Marshall also holds 53 world and American records in the snatch and clean and jerk.
SPORTS
January 6, 1994 | DANNY ROBBINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The NCAA sent a stern message Wednesday to one of its oft-troubled members, Texas A&M, taking the unusual step of placing the school on probation for five years as a result of rules violations involving the Aggies' football program. Only two other schools--Southeastern Louisiana and Upsala College--have received probationary periods of a similar duration from the NCAA.
SPORTS
August 3, 1995 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alabama, with the third-winningest program in major college football history, was placed on three years' probation and severely penalized after the NCAA Committee on Infractions found the school guilty of unethical conduct and "a distressing failure of institutional control."
SPORTS
December 13, 1989 | MARK ASHER, WASHINGTON POST
The NCAA put the North Carolina State basketball program on probation Tuesday for two years because of violations involving the sale of complimentary tickets and sneakers during the past four seasons. The sanctions will keep the Wolfpack out of this season's NCAA or National Invitation tournaments.
SPORTS
April 29, 1988 | MARYANN HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
A spokesman for the International Federation of Gymnastics (FIG) said Thursday that the sport's governing body is aware that countries make deals to fix scoring in competitions, but said the collaboration is difficult to police. "Everybody is aware of this thing, but no one can prove it," said Frank Edmond, vice president of FIG. Edmond, reached in Bristol, England, was responding to a claim by Greg Marsden, former U.S.
SPORTS
September 28, 1990 | LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there was any doubt how important high school football is in Texas, listen up. The price of crude oil reached $40 a barrel this week, which should make the West Texas town of Odessa delirious. That's the kind of news that could snap an oil town's depression, which is just about what Odessa has been in for the better part of a decade. But that's not the important news in town.
SPORTS
August 16, 2013 | Bill Shaikin
A 144-year-old sport that popularized the phrase "kill the ump" now has a 21st century idea: Correct the ump. In a radical step for a sport steeped in tradition, Major League Baseball announced Thursday its intention to make instant replay available on almost all calls made by umpires, starting next year, pending the expected approval of owners, players and umpires. "This is a historic day," Commissioner Bud Selig said at the owners' meetings in Cooperstown, N.Y. Selig long had resisted any use of replay, citing the charm of the human element and the concern over whether lengthy video reviews might stall games.
SPORTS
April 14, 2013 | BILL DWYRE
Opportunities of magnitude, life-changing moments, should be seized and cherished. Tiger Woods had one Saturday at the Masters, and he shanked it. Same for tournament officials. This is not so much a golf tournament as it is a monument to sport the way it should be. It wears it on its sleeve, preaches it to the masses. Fred Ridley, chairman of the competition committee and a man in the eye of a hurricane, along with Woods, stated firmly during an appearance in front of various media, "Integrity has been the underpinning of this tournament.
SPORTS
March 15, 2013 | Helene Elliott
The NHL's board of governors on Thursday approved realignment and a division-based playoff format for next season, a decision that was expected but was acknowledged by Commissioner Gary Bettman as not having been unanimous. Under the new plan, which will be in effect for at least three seasons, the playoffs for the first time will include wild-card qualifiers. The league will operate under a two-conference, four-division setup in which the East will have 16 teams and the West will have 14. The Kings and Ducks will be grouped with Calgary, Edmonton, Phoenix, San Jose and Vancouver.
SPORTS
September 27, 2010 | David Wharton
No one else had to know about the extra club in Zach Nash's golf bag. The five-wood belonged to a friend, and Zach forgot it was there as he played his way to victory in a junior tournament near his Wisconsin home this summer. The 14-year-old accepted his medal, celebrated with grandparents who had come from Iowa to watch, and stopped by his country club to share the news. Then his golf pro noticed something amiss. "Count your clubs," he told the teenager. Fifteen -- one more than allowed.
SPORTS
December 6, 2008 | Lance Pugmire, Pugmire is a Times staff writer.
A dispute over how Oscar De La Hoya wraps his hands for a fight grew contentious Friday before the Nevada State Athletic Commission said his taping method can effectively remain status quo. De La Hoya's tape man, Joe Chavez, uses two-inch-wide brown medical tape around his fighter's hands and then rolls up the tape between the fingers to help cushion what the De La Hoya camp describes as sensitive hands.
SPORTS
April 20, 2008 | Bill Shaikin
You've seen the play a million times. Routine ground ball. First baseman picks up the ball, runs it to the bag for the out, "3U" in your scorebook. Adam LaRoche picked up the ball, but he did not run. "I was kind of out of it," he said. He walked the ball to the bag. The runner beat him there. "I wasn't even thinking there was a runner," LaRoche said. The crowd booed, his home crowd. LaRoche apologized to his pitcher, then his manager. "It looked like I was being lazy," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edward P. Roski Jr., who is bidding to land a National Football League expansion for a refurbished Los Angeles Coliseum, owns a casino in Las Vegas--an apparent conflict under league rules. Roski operates the Silverton Hotel Casino and RV Park, which he opened about 18 months ago when the previous casino went bust. Roski--who owns the property--had been leasing the site to operators of the Boomtown casino.
SPORTS
December 6, 1989 | TOM HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Bosanko, assistant football coach at El Toro High School, has been suspended from coaching football for one year by Saddleback Valley Unified School District officials following a recommendation from administrators of the Southern Section office. "We determined that there was a rule violation based on information provided to this office, and El Toro has accepted a recommendation that the coach be suspended," said Bill Clark, Southern Section administrator in charge of football.
SPORTS
March 30, 2008 | Sam Farmer, Times Staff Writer
The NFL has gone 20 years without a player strike -- longer than any other major sports league -- and that has paved the way for unparalleled popularity and riches. But nothing lasts forever. With labor unrest looming, the league's 32 owners will gather today in Palm Beach, Fla., for the start of their annual meetings.
SPORTS
February 29, 2008 | Dylan Hernandez
VERO BEACH, Fla. -- To protest baseball's new rule requiring base coaches to wear helmets, Larry Bowa threatened to march to his work station along the third base line wearing shin guards, a chest protector and a mask. "I'll really make a joke out of it," Bowa said. Bowa refused to wear a helmet in the Dodgers' exhibition opener Thursday at Holman Stadium and said he had no intention of doing so in the future.
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