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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
The new sports drama "As One" tells the story of how in 1991, for the purposes of the World Table Tennis Championships, North Korea and South Korea reunited, putting forward a single team in the hopes of preventing the Chinese from winning a ninth consecutive title. (What does it say about the state of international geo-politics that in a story featuring North Korea, China can still function as an all-purpose villain?) The top female players from each nation (Korean stars Ha Ji-won and Bae Doo-na)
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SPORTS
May 4, 2013 | By David Wharton
An old coach named Fred "The Fog" Shero once described the relationship between Canadians and their national pastime this way: "Hockey is where we live. … Life is just a place where we spend time between games. " It could feel like that in Southern California over the next few weeks. This is hockey's time to shine with two local teams in the hunt for the Stanley Cup, the Kings fighting to repeat as champions and the Ducks riding one of the better records in the league. The way things have gone for the Lakers and Clippers, and with our baseball teams struggling, the sport from up north could win some new fans.
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SPORTS
July 27, 1993 | THERESA SMITH MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His classmates held him down, produced a shiny razor and shaved Steve Baxter's legs. Hunks of skin were caught in the blade, and the nicks and cuts unleashed a steady stream of blood. Now, Baxter coaches swimmers who hold shaving parties. It is a strange ritual, peculiar--but also essential--to swimming. For six-month periods, female swimmers refrain from shaving their legs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
The new sports drama "As One" tells the story of how in 1991, for the purposes of the World Table Tennis Championships, North Korea and South Korea reunited, putting forward a single team in the hopes of preventing the Chinese from winning a ninth consecutive title. (What does it say about the state of international geo-politics that in a story featuring North Korea, China can still function as an all-purpose villain?) The top female players from each nation (Korean stars Ha Ji-won and Bae Doo-na)
SPORTS
March 10, 1994 | JIM MURRAY
To "rabbit" is an intransitive verb which, in track and field, means to sacrifice oneself, to take the heat for someone else--kind of like being on a minesweeper or cutting the barbed wire before an offensive. A "rabbit," the noun, denotes a self-effacing person who willingly subordinates his ambitions for those of another. I guess the original rabbit in this country was John Alden when he was the forerunner for Miles Standish in pursuit of Priscilla Mullins.
SPORTS
August 9, 1998 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
Was Michael Jordan born to be a great pressure player? Is there something in his genetic blueprint that makes him more dependable in times of duress? Are athletes predisposed to success or failure? Can you test your 10-year-old Jimmy to see if he is cut out to be a relief pitcher? More important, does Laker phenom Kobe Bryant have what it takes between the ears to become the next Jordan? The answers, according to Jonathan P. Niednagel, are yes, yes, yes, yes and, um, no.
SPORTS
October 22, 1992 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harland Svare was 31 when the Rams promoted him from defensive line coach to head coach halfway through the 1962 season. He was the youngest coach in the history of an old league, and all these years later, it's a distinction Svare still holds. He remembers, though, that he didn't give it much thought until this year, when two other 30-somethings, Dave Shula and Bill Cowher, are leading a new youth movement in the NFL.
SPORTS
June 22, 1995 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's either the scourge of the NHL or a stroke of genius. It's either "destroy hockey," as Detroit Red Wing defenseman Viacheslav Fetisov disdainfully called it, or the ultimate strategy because its success depends on the discipline and selflessness of every player. It's the New Jersey Devils' neutral zone trap, and no one who has seen it during the team's march to the Stanley Cup finals remains neutral about it.
SPORTS
December 29, 1995 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Northwestern has a secret edge over USC in Monday's Rose Bowl game, quarterback Steve Schnur thinks it might be the Wildcats' one-quarterback system as opposed to the Trojans' two-quarterback offense. Schnur knows all about two quarterbacks. He and Tim Hughes, a junior college transfer from Butte College in Oroville, Calif., shared duties last year. Before the 3-7-1 season was over, the student newspaper, the Daily Northwestern, referred to them as Beavis and Butt-head.
SPORTS
February 24, 2001 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASCAR drivers are gathering today at North Carolina Speedway for Sunday's Dura-Lube 400, second race in the Winston Cup season, but, in their hearts and minds, most have still not moved on from the final lap of last Sunday's Daytona 500. About the only talk here is of the shocking accident that took the life of an American sporting legend.
SPORTS
October 4, 2011 | Mike Bresnahan
Bob Toledo practically roars when he hears the reason for the phone call. Trick plays. Always one of his favorite topics. "We have two or three a game here," said the former UCLA coach, now in his fifth year at Tulane. "Our fans can't get enough of them. " Toledo definitely takes it to the extreme, mixing in reverse passes and quarterback throwbacks practically as often as he sends out his punt team. But for head coaches in the NFL, trick plays are considered dangerous, potential career-enders, monsters with long sharp teeth waiting to end a quarterback's season.
SPORTS
August 14, 2006 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
From his home in Springville, Utah, Billy Casper is keeping a close eye on Tiger Woods. Even though Woods is in Medinah, Ill., for the PGA Championship, he's still within arm's reach of Casper, and not only because Woods has 50 victories on the PGA Tour and Casper is one ahead at 51. "He'll win 100 before he's through," said Casper, the 75-year-old Hall of Fame player born in San Diego.
SPORTS
July 25, 2006 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Tiger Woods just won his third British Open and his 11th major title by basically shoving his driver to the bottom of his bag, but that strategy probably won't cut it at next month's PGA Championship at Medinah (Ill.) Country Club. The PGA of America has set up Medinah as the longest course in the history of major championship golf -- 7,561 yards -- and chances are good that drivers, not just the one belonging to Woods, are going to get plenty of work.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stage was set for the Philadelphia 76ers to collapse and Coach Larry Brown decided to roll the dice. With his team's 15-point lead being chopped up by the Lakers and Dikembe Mutombo on the bench with three fouls and 6:18 remaining in the third quarter, Brown chose to keep his defensive-minded center out of the game and take his chances. "Yes, it surprised me. I was very surprised," said Mutombo, Philadelphia's best defense against the Lakers' Shaquille O'Neal.
SPORTS
February 24, 2001 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NASCAR drivers are gathering today at North Carolina Speedway for Sunday's Dura-Lube 400, second race in the Winston Cup season, but, in their hearts and minds, most have still not moved on from the final lap of last Sunday's Daytona 500. About the only talk here is of the shocking accident that took the life of an American sporting legend.
SPORTS
January 26, 2001 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They say you can't run against the Baltimore Raven defense. But you can't hide, either. Among the theories on attacking the record-setting Raven defense is that a team can't abandon the run, even if the Ravens stuff it regularly. Once a team does, the Ravens know what's coming, and the quarterback had better duck.
SPORTS
January 2, 1994 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wisconsin was the home team Saturday in the Rose Bowl and red-clad Badger fans--who seemed to outnumber UCLA backers by more than two to one--made it look and sound like merely another Saturday in Camp Randall Stadium. The Bruins, who must have wondered where all the red shirts came from in the stands, must have wondered, too, where all the red-shirted tailbacks came from in the Wisconsin backfield.
SPORTS
October 5, 2000 | PAIGE A. LEECH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks? Don't pin that cliche on Dennis Gossard. The offensive coordinator at Crescenta Valley High has been coaching football on the high school and junior college levels for 30 years, primarily with a philosophy of run, run, run until the defense takes the wing-T away. "You always fall back on what you're comfortable with," said Gossard, a former coach at Pasadena City College and Crescenta Valley. "And I know how to run the football."
SPORTS
November 2, 1999 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the most infamous substitution in hockey history, and 20 years later no one, not even those in the building at the time, can tell you exactly what happened. The Boston Bruins were 2 minutes 34 seconds from reaching the Stanley Cup finals and about to face down their demons. Fans in the Montreal Forum, packed to the rafters, were stressed as their Canadiens, the three-time defending champions, trailed, 4-3, in Game 7 of the 1979 semifinals. Then . . .
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