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Spotted Owls

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SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
As shy creatures of quiet places, federally threatened northern spotted owls have little tolerance for the larger, more aggressive barred owls moving into their ancient forests in the northwestern United States. Trouble is, ousted spotted owls are colonizing less suitable habitat elsewhere, lowering the probability of successfully producing young, according to a study by U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Forest Service biologists recently published in the journal Ecology. The situation has become so desperate that federal biologists are considering efforts to remove, or kill, some of the barred owls occupying the old growth forests of Oregon, Washington and Northern California, Charles Yackulic, USGS research statistician and lead author of the study, said.
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SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
As shy creatures of quiet places, federally threatened northern spotted owls have little tolerance for the larger, more aggressive barred owls moving into their ancient forests in the northwestern United States. Trouble is, ousted spotted owls are colonizing less suitable habitat elsewhere, lowering the probability of successfully producing young, according to a study by U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Forest Service biologists recently published in the journal Ecology. The situation has become so desperate that federal biologists are considering efforts to remove, or kill, some of the barred owls occupying the old growth forests of Oregon, Washington and Northern California, Charles Yackulic, USGS research statistician and lead author of the study, said.
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NEWS
October 2, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. said Tuesday that he will convene a Cabinet-level panel that can override the Endangered Species Act and allow timber harvesting on nearly 4,600 acres considered vital to survival of the Northern spotted owl. Lujan's decision to have the panel consider a possible exemption to the law came in response to a lengthy application filed Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Standing on ridges miles away from the Rim fire, John Buckley has traced the path of the huge Sierra Nevada blaze by watching fire clouds billowing above the Stanislaus National Forest. The view has been sobering. As the Rim blaze burns its way into the record books, Buckley thinks it is roasting some of the last remaining old-growth stands in the Stanislaus forest, incinerating thousands of acres of young trees planted at a cost of millions of dollars after massive 1987 fires and destroying important nesting areas for California spotted owls and goshawks.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Chocolate brown and covered with white spots, the pair of spotted owls were barely visible in the dappled sunlight of a thickly wooded canyon a few miles north of here in the San Bernardino Mountains. Still, wildlife biologists Bill LaHaye and John Stephenson moved quietly beneath the owls' perch and used a long metal pole with a nylon noose to snare the birds and bring them to the ground without harm. The biologists fasten a numbered metal band around the leg of each owl they capture.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration, in response to the growing conflict over spotted owls and national forest management, plans a broad review of its public lands policy, a congressman said Wednesday. However, Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter told Rep. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) this week that the Administration remains convinced that Northwest lawmakers have overestimated job losses anticipated as a result of owl protection measures.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Biologists hired by the Timber Assn. of California asserted Thursday that a new, though incomplete, survey of commercial forests indicates that northern spotted owls thrive in numbers far greater than reported by independent and government scientists. The assertion came during a hearing on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's proposal to protect the owl under the Endangered Species Act--a move that could radically alter the future of the national forests in California, Oregon and Washington.
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge issued a ruling that may prohibit logging of remaining old-growth Douglas fir throughout Northern California and the Pacific Northwest and force the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to declare a species of owl to be endangered, environmentalists and timber industry spokesmen said Friday. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Thomas S. Zilly of Seattle gives the U.S.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2007 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
To save the northern spotted owl, federal authorities have listed the bird under the Endangered Species Act, set aside 7 million acres of forest for owl habitat, and imposed stiff fines on those who harm the chocolate-colored football-sized raptors. But the spotted owl population is still in deep peril nearly 15 years after President Clinton brokered a compact to protect its old-growth habitat.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2008 | Kim Murphy, Murphy is a Times staff writer.
Scott Gremel makes his way swiftly and surely up the steep trail, across a frigid stream, through the colossal stands of hemlock and Douglas fir. On the ridgeline, thousands of feet above where he left his truck on the valley floor, Gremel points the antenna on his tracking device toward the next valley. A faint ping responds, the radio tag of a single barred owl that has laid claim to two entire valleys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Michael San Miguel, an ardent conservationist known for his accomplishments in Southern California field ornithology and bird banding, died late Wednesday while conducting a spotted owl survey in the San Gabriel Mountains. He was 70. San Miguel was traversing a steep canyon along the West Fork of the San Gabriel River when he slipped and fell about 100 feet, said his son, Michael Jr. Word of the accident spread quickly throughout the Southern California birding community, which regarded the longtime Arcadia resident as a role model and mentor.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2008 | Kim Murphy, Murphy is a Times staff writer.
Scott Gremel makes his way swiftly and surely up the steep trail, across a frigid stream, through the colossal stands of hemlock and Douglas fir. On the ridgeline, thousands of feet above where he left his truck on the valley floor, Gremel points the antenna on his tracking device toward the next valley. A faint ping responds, the radio tag of a single barred owl that has laid claim to two entire valleys.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Bush administration released a final recovery plan for the northern spotted owl that officials say could lead to recovery of the threatened bird in 30 years. The plan, released in Portland, identifies the primary threats as habitat loss due to logging and catastrophic wildfires. Conservation groups called the plan flawed and said it fails to restrict old-growth logging enough to ensure recovery.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2007 | Alison Williams, Times Staff Writer
For the first time since coming under federal protection 15 years ago, the northern spotted owls' forest haven may be in jeopardy. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to decrease the owls' "critical habitat" by 1.5 million acres, or 22%. The birds were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1990, with the habitat designation coming two years later.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2007 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
To save the northern spotted owl, federal authorities have listed the bird under the Endangered Species Act, set aside 7 million acres of forest for owl habitat, and imposed stiff fines on those who harm the chocolate-colored football-sized raptors. But the spotted owl population is still in deep peril nearly 15 years after President Clinton brokered a compact to protect its old-growth habitat.
NEWS
July 27, 2003 | Gillian Flaccus, Associated Press Writer
The late afternoon sun slants through the dense canopy of Deschutes National Forest by the time Lauri Turner reaches the spot where she last heard the harsh cry of a northern spotted owl. Turner, a Forest Service wildlife biologist for the Sisters Ranger District, slips off her backpack and waits as her colleague, Kris Hennings, carefully deposits his carrier containing five live mice on the dirt path.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1989 | From Times wire services
A federal appeals court today opened the gates to logging of 500 million board feet of timber on Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon despite a desperate fight by environmentalists claiming spotted owls would be endangered. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals had barred logging within two miles of known nesting sites of the northern spotted owl while the appeal was pending.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
In a bruising loss for environmentalists, a federal appeals court Wednesday overturned an injunction protecting some Oregon habitat of the rare northern spotted owl, ruling that such protection requires a full trial. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals order was based on a 1987 federal law carried for the timber industry by Sen. Mark O. Hatfield (R-Ore.) that limits challenges of virgin timber sales by the federal Bureau of Land Management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2003 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Forest Service is retreating from a much-criticized plan to heavily cut parts of two Northern California forests in order to study the effects of different logging levels on the California spotted owl. Acknowledging that they did not have sufficient public backing to proceed with the work in a timely fashion, forest service officials in California on Tuesday said they were redesigning the study.
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