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NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
If Nancy Reagan ever dropped in on Texas, she would make a foursome: four past and present Republican First Ladies, all married to anti-abortion politicians, and yet who themselves, to varying degrees, support a right to abortion. Anita Perry, wife of the super-duper pro-lifer Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who just signed into law very stringent abortion regulations, let it slip over the weekend that she regards abortion as “a woman's right.” She answered a question at the Texas Tribune festival with an equivocal-sounding response - that she and her husband agree on abortion - but with an eyebrow-raising kicker: It's a “difficult” question, she said, “because I see it as a women's right.
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SCIENCE
April 14, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Sound familiar? Your normally cheerful spouse has suddenly, and inexplicably, turned cranky and an otherwise pleasant day is fast becoming a scene from "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. " When you see those storm clouds gathering in your significant other's eyes, you might do well to give them some carbohydrates -- and fast. At least that's the advice of a team of researchers who examined the connection between low blood sugar levels and aggression in married couples. The paper , which was published Monday in PNAS, found that when blood glucose levels dropped, spouses were far more likely to stick pins into voodoo dolls representing their mates.
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NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Spouses tend to share various symptoms and physical limitations and are influenced by each other's health problems, according to a new study.   Researchers studied emotional and physical medical histories of more than 1,700 older couples over a 15-year period. The participants were age 76 to 90 and most had been married for several decades. The study showed that functional limitations in one spouse -- not being able to walk up stairs, for example -- could trigger depression in both spouses.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By David Zucchino
FT. BRAGG, North Carolina - Within the tight circle of Army spouses, Kris Johnson and Rebecca Sinclair became close friends as their ambitious husbands advanced rapidly in the officer corps. Both women were ultimately betrayed by their philandering spouses. Both endured public humiliation as their high-ranking husbands were hauled before courts-martial amid salacious testimony about adultery and other sex-related military crimes. And both women, along with their children, risked losing a lifetime of military benefits if their husbands were dismissed from the Army.
NEWS
June 14, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Here’s some breaking news: A study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh’s Sleep Medicine Institute has found that wives can be grumpy with their husbands if they don't get a good night’s sleep. Perhaps future research can determine whether husbands tend to hog the covers, whether the other side of the pillow is in fact cooler or whether the setting sun has some effect on darkness. The researchers likely could have made the same discovery by simply talking to anyone who has ever been married.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2013 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
SANFORD, N.C. - Ashley Broadway and Army Lt. Col. Heather Mack have been a couple for 15 years. Broadway attended every one of Mack's promotion ceremonies. The two lived together when Mack served on bases in Texas and Kansas. When Mack was deployed to South Korea, Broadway joined her there. She cared for their young son, Carson, when Mack was sent to Kuwait. On Nov. 10, the women legally married in Washington, D.C. Broadway began a new life as a military spouse, certain that with the repeal in 2011 of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy that banned gays from serving openly, she would enjoy the same rights as other spouses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2011 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
Should government agencies pick up the meal costs when spouses of elected officials attend out-of-town meetings and conferences? A Southeast Los Angeles County water district did just that, to the tune of several thousand dollars. In explaining a policy change two years ago, a staffer for the Central Basin Municipal Water District wrote in an internal email that spouses "help bring a different atmosphere to the business discussions between directors and other guests. " The staffer acknowledged that the policy could result in "questioning by reporters and auditors on these types of reimbursements.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Feuding spouses who built a wall through their three-story row house because neither would give it up cannot divorce, a jury ruled in New York. The jurors rejected the "cruel and inhuman treatment" Chana Taub cited as grounds for divorcing Simon Taub after more than 20 years of marriage. "I'm dismissing the whole case. That's it," Justice Carolyn Demarest said. To revive the case, Chana Taub would have to refile on new grounds.
OPINION
October 6, 2010 | By Andres Salazar
Americans often tout the great freedoms that U.S. citizenship grants. But lately I have a hard time seeing it that way. Instead, I find myself toying with renouncing my citizenship. When it comes to my ability to spend my life with the person I love, this country has turned its back on me. I am a dual national. I was born in the United States to an American mother and a Spanish father. I grew up in Spain, although my family frequently jetted across the ocean to maintain bonds with family and friends.
NATIONAL
August 2, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Spouses in same-sex marriages will be given the same preferential consideration in their visa applications now enjoyed by those in opposite-sex marriages, Secretary of State John F. Kerry said Friday. Kerry made the announcement in the consular section of the U.S. Embassy in London, one of the largest of the 222 visa centers in the world. His statement was distributed via email to reporters around the world. “As long as a marriage has been performed in a jurisdiction that recognizes it, so that it is legal, then that marriage is valid under U.S. immigration laws, and every married couple will be treated exactly the same,” Kerry said.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I am 55 and my wife is 65. She only worked a few part-time jobs as she spent most of her working years raising our nine beautiful children. My question is, since she does not have enough credits to collect Social Security on her own work record, can she claim spousal benefits on my work history? If so, at what age and how will it affect my benefits? Answer: Your wife can receive spousal benefits based on your work record, but those checks can't start until you're old enough to qualify for benefits at age 62 (when she's 72)
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON -- Same-sex spouses must be provided equal access to family healthcare plans offered by insurers in the Affordable Care Act marketplace exchanges, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Friday. Beginning next year, “insurance companies will not be permitted to discriminate against married same-sex couples when offering coverage,” Matthew Heinz, the agency's director of provider and LGBT outreach, said in a blog post. According to the guidelines, insurance companies that provide family plans to heterosexual couples will not be allowed to deny similar plans to same-sex married couples.
TRAVEL
February 23, 2014
Stunning photos and report on the Anasazi ruins of Cedar Mesa, Utah ["Rock of Ages" by David Kelly, Feb. 16]. Thank you. I went to Natural Bridges National Monument; now I'll go back and explore more ruins. The drive on Highway 261 south off the edge of Cedar Mesa into Mexican Hat is not for the faint of heart. They're not kidding when they recommend 5 mph. Anne Eggebroten Santa Monica Trust your map, or your spouse? Regarding the Letters column ["Women Can Read Maps Just Fine," Feb. 16]
HOME & GARDEN
November 22, 2013 | By Cynthia Case
"This might be a crazy question, today of all days," read the text that arrived one Monday in July. "But do you have any interest in going to see 'Despicable Me 2' at the Marina Pacifica this evening?" That day, of all days, it was a crazy question. It was the first anniversary of our decision to get divorced - and, had we stayed married, it also would have been our fifth anniversary. One year earlier, my dear wife had taken my hands in hers and tearfully confirmed for me that she was really a he and wanted to undergo gender reassignment surgery in order to become her authentic self.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Starbucks wants the country's defenders to return from the front lines on its payroll, pledging to hire 10,000 veterans and military spouses in the next five years. In an initiative organized in part by Starbucks board member and former Defense Secretary Robert Gates, the Seattle coffee giant said it hopes to tap the unique communication, leadership and problem-solving skills developed by veterans and their families. “This is not a charity initiative,” said Starbucks Chief Community Officer Blair Taylor in an interview this week.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2013 | By David Cloud and Michael Muskal
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered the head of the National Guard “to take immediate action” to ensure that same-sex spouses of guard personnel in nine states - including Texas, Florida and South Carolina - are allowed to register for full benefits an receive identification cards giving them access to military bases in keeping with a Pentagon policy that went into effect in September. Despite the new policy, National Guard commanders in those nine states, which do not permit same-sex marriages, have refused to register gay spouses at guard installations.
NATIONAL
May 30, 2010 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Just after Wesley Bauguess' husband, Larry, an Army major, was killed in action in Pakistan in May 2007, she had to make immediate decisions, including what to do about her husband's survivor benefits. In shock and consumed by grief, Bauguess waded through confusing technical details before deciding to receive benefits in the names of her two daughters, then 6 and 4. Later, she discovered that her daughters have to file tax returns on the benefits — at a potential tax rate of 36%. They were snared by the "kiddie tax," a provision passed by Congress in 1986 to prevent wealthy parents from sheltering assets in their children's names.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By David Zucchino
FT. BRAGG, North Carolina - Within the tight circle of Army spouses, Kris Johnson and Rebecca Sinclair became close friends as their ambitious husbands advanced rapidly in the officer corps. Both women were ultimately betrayed by their philandering spouses. Both endured public humiliation as their high-ranking husbands were hauled before courts-martial amid salacious testimony about adultery and other sex-related military crimes. And both women, along with their children, risked losing a lifetime of military benefits if their husbands were dismissed from the Army.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
Rachel Poole was at home in Texas this week, nine months pregnant and talking on the phone with her husband, Justin, who was thousands of miles away, deployed overseas with the U.S. Army. But neither knew that a man armed with a knife had broken into their east El Paso home. The intruder stabbed Rachel Poole multiple times in the face and body. Poole screamed as her husband listened helplessly, police said. After the attacker fled, Rachel Poole called 911 and was taken to a local hospital, where police said she was in critical condition Thursday.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
As veterans continued to liberate lightly barricaded national monuments in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, the federal government shutdown stands to hit children and the disadvantaged particularly hard if the days wear on. Here's a tour of some of the more inconvenient closures that will become collateral damage in Capitol Hill's fight over federal healthcare spending. 1. Kids with cancer turned away from clinical trials at the National Institutes of Health. National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins has said that about 200 patients -- including 30 kids, mostly with cancer -- would be turned away from clinical trials each week with three-fourths of the institutes' staff furloughed, according to the Wall Street Journal.  As the Washington Post's Brad Plumer adds , citing a government memo , clinical trial participants typically enroll "only when standard medical treatments have failed, and other treatment options are not available.
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