Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpouses Employment
IN THE NEWS

Spouses Employment

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | Associated Press
The state civil rights agency has given employers more leeway to refuse to hire a husband and wife. In a newly released decision, the Fair Employment and Housing Commission ruled that an employer could consider "the mutual concerns married couples are assumed to bear" in deciding whether hiring both spouses would create conflicts or other work problems. Previously, the commission had required a company to show that a particular husband and wife were likely to cause problems on the job.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | Associated Press
The state civil rights agency has given employers more leeway to refuse to hire a husband and wife. In a newly released decision, the Fair Employment and Housing Commission ruled that an employer could consider "the mutual concerns married couples are assumed to bear" in deciding whether hiring both spouses would create conflicts or other work problems. Previously, the commission had required a company to show that a particular husband and wife were likely to cause problems on the job.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
To hear House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) talk about it, the most important issue involved in the Ethics Committee's case against him is the right of his wife, Betty, to have her own career. It was Wright's defense of his wife that caused him to choke up on national television last week, and it is Mrs. Wright's employment history that the Speaker has chosen to defend--to the virtual exclusion of all other matters--since he was charged with 69 violations of House rules on Monday.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1988 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Last April, Juan and Lynne Matute pulled up stakes in Los Angeles and moved to the South. They had little choice. Western Airlines, their employer for nearly two decades, had been bought by Delta Airlines, and their jobs were moving to Atlanta. Although they were reluctant to make the move, Lynne now says it was a "good decision, a real plus." All told, Western had 5,000 employees in Los Angeles, which was its headquarters, but Delta needed only about 2,900 employees here after the merger.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|