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Spring Airlines

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BUSINESS
February 19, 2006 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
Spring Airlines gives new meaning to low-fare, no-frills flying. For a one-way ticket from Shanghai to Qingdao, about the distance from Los Angeles to San Francisco, it charges as little as $12.50. You won't get a bag of peanuts on the plane, but 50 cents will get you a pickled duck wing. And don't plan on packing anything heavy. Passengers are allowed to check bags weighing a total of 33 pounds, about a third of the limit set by most U.S. carriers.
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BUSINESS
February 19, 2006 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
Spring Airlines gives new meaning to low-fare, no-frills flying. For a one-way ticket from Shanghai to Qingdao, about the distance from Los Angeles to San Francisco, it charges as little as $12.50. You won't get a bag of peanuts on the plane, but 50 cents will get you a pickled duck wing. And don't plan on packing anything heavy. Passengers are allowed to check bags weighing a total of 33 pounds, about a third of the limit set by most U.S. carriers.
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TRAVEL
December 24, 2006
I enjoyed the article on the lack of service from airlines ["Airlines' Plans to Improve Service Are Barely Off the Ground," Travel Insider, Dec. 17]. Even when airlines offer compensation for bumped passengers, it can be an illusory reward. Last spring, United Airlines issued my wife and me "compensation vouchers." Despite the inconvenience United had caused us, we were satisfied with the vouchers -- until we tried to use them. When I went to the United website to book flights, I discovered that the vouchers could be applied only to certain fares.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2009 | Peter Pae
An airline in China is mulling over plans that would allow passengers to stand during short flights and pay less than those who have seats. Spring Airlines, a low-cost carrier based in Shanghai, said having passengers stand up in flight would enable it to cram 40% more travelers into its Airbus A320 planes while cutting operating costs 20%.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2002 | JOHN CRAWLEY, REUTERS
The debt-ridden U.S. airline industry will be near ruin if the government does not help it reduce insurance costs, taxes and other expenses related to aviation security, the chief executive of the world's biggest carrier warned Congress on Tuesday. "Without relief, our efforts to control our own costs will likely be futile," Donald Carty, chairman and CEO of AMR Corp., parent of American Airlines, told the House aviation subcommittee. He also warned that any U.S.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2007 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
Last month's massive cancellations and weather delays by JetBlue Airways may have shaken American travelers. But China can top that -- and often does. It doesn't take much to roil the fast-growing aviation system here. Military drills can cause sudden flight disruptions. So can bad equipment. Cancellations sometimes happen at the last minute and for no obvious reason. In an incident in Japan last month, Air China passengers went ballistic.
TRAVEL
January 19, 1997 | JAMES T. YENCKEL, WASHINGTON POST
Dubrovnik? Zagreb? Belgrade? Cities that for the past few years have been making headlines because of unrest are suddenly appearing on tourist itineraries. And the rush to reopen the troubled Balkan region to tourism is only one of many big changes--some good, some not so good--awaiting travelers in the upcoming year. The U.S. economy is strong, unemployment is low and air fares remain a bargain, all important factors that are expected to stimulate travel in 1997.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USAir, a victim of high fuel costs and a bruising West Coast fare war, said Friday that it was cutting most of its flights within California to stem huge losses. The airline's dramatic retrenchment virtually undoes its 1986 purchase of Pacific Southwest Airlines and comes two weeks after a bruised American Airlines all but pulled out of California's north-south corridor.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2008 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Flying to Tokyo this spring? United Airlines last week offered a round-trip flight for as little as $400 -- plus $300 in fuel charges. With oil prices high, fuel surcharges on many international flights have climbed in recent months to nearly half the price of a ticket. U.S. visitors to Spain can expect to pay up to $390 in fuel surcharges for a round-trip flight. Air New Zealand imposes up to $360 in fuel fees. There doesn't seem to be any relief in sight as fares surge with the price of fuel.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE and JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
USAir, victimized by the recession, a bruising West Coast fare war and soaring aviation-fuel costs, said Friday that it will cancel service to Orange County and seven other West Coast airports in an effort to pare costs. As part of the retrenchment, the Phoenix-based carrier said it will terminate 22 daily flights between John Wayne Airport and the Bay Area, Sacramento and Phoenix as of May 2. The airline now provides more service to Orange County than any other carrier.
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