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Spring Fever

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NEWS
April 10, 1986 | From United Press International
A wintry storm put a damper on spring fever in the East today, blanketing the Appalachians with up to a foot of snow and pushing temperatures into the 30s as far south as Florida. Light snow and cold temperatures stretched from the Great Lakes across the central Appalachians into northern New England, the National Weather Service said. The snowstorm dropped 12 inches of snow on Terra Alta in the northern mountains of West Virginia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- A male koala, thought to be in the grip of spring fever, escaped from the koala enclosure at the San Diego Zoo on Tuesday and scampered to a tree several dozen yards away. The koala was discovered missing about 9 a.m. and was soon found in a nearby tree. By midafternoon, the 2-year-old koala named Mundu, who was born at the zoo, was still in the eucalyptus tree. Zookeepers were keeping an eye on the animal and plan once the zoo is closed to retrieve him, a spokeswoman said.
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NEWS
April 11, 1991 | MARY YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Mary Yarber teaches English and journalism at Santa Monica High School. She writes a weekly column on education for The Times
Many teen-agers would agree with T. S. Eliot that April--the beginning of that long stretch of school between spring break and summer--is indeed the cruelest month. The symptoms of spring fever can be seen on campuses everywhere as calculators and backpacks are replaced by coconut oil and beach towels. But some students just can't wait for that last bell to ring in June, so they participate in another, more harmful, rite of spring--ditching. Just about anyone who has seen a California springtime can understand why many local students don't want to spend it in a classroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Mark Olsen
Call it "slow horror," "art horror," "indie horror," even "hipster horror" if you must, but in "The House of the Devil," filmmaker Ti West is definitely doing something that stands apart from the usual guts and gore of most contemporary horror movies. Preferring the slow burn to fast thrills, West somehow transforms the mundane into the macabre, and when his film finally takes a step into the supernatural, it comes as even more of a shock because of the muted atmosphere that precedes it. Already available on video-on-demand, "Devil" opens in Los Angeles, New York and Austin, Texas, theaters on Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1985 | United Press International
Snow-weary Northerners may welcome the first weeks of spring, but for 14 million Americans this time of year also marks the beginning of hay fever season. Although allergies may be unavoidable, there are some dos and don'ts that can help lessen the aggravation. The American Academy of Allergy and Immunology recommends avoiding strenuous exercise or jogging in the early morning because the causes of springtime allergies are most numerous at that time.
SPORTS
March 14, 2003 | PETE THOMAS
Spring may still be a week away, but spring fever has already reached epidemic proportions south of the border and is working its way north. "Unusual? It's unheard of for this time of year, really," Jeff DeBuys, skipper of the Red Rooster III, said Wednesday of his encounter two weeks ago with a large school of albacore 340 miles south of his home port in San Diego.
SPORTS
March 13, 1988 | STEVE ELLING, Times Staff Writer
Don MacLean and Butch Hawking ditched school Friday. The Simi Valley seniors stayed home and watched college games on television. It was a different type of spring fever for the pair--the two had just been sprung from basketball season. They needed time to unwind. "I was sitting home recapping the season and thinking about college," said Hawking, a senior guard. "I had too much on my mind to handle school."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1988 | LONN JOHNSTON and HUGO MARTIN, Times Staff Writer
They'll be waiting in the Balboa Fun Zone for the onslaught, 25 of them--triple the usual contingent. And the odds against these Newport Beach police officers look overwhelming, especially if the sun shines. For the next two weeks, Newport Beach--along with Laguna Beach and Huntington Beach--is where the boys are, with bikinis sure to be reflected in their Ray-Bans.
HEALTH
April 18, 2005 | Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, Special to The Times
Responsive to the cuckoo's note, The untaught harmony of spring: While, whisp'ring pleasure as they fly, Cool Zephyrs thro' the clear blue sky Their gathered fragrance fling.... Thomas Gray, "Ode on the Spring" * Forget about odes to spring. Neuroscience has taken the magic, not to mention the mystery, out of the poetry. That surge of optimism? Merely the serotonergic response to increased daylight. The distraction and dreaminess? The neurotransmitter dopamine is responding to light and warmth.
HEALTH
March 31, 2008 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Spring fever, that reputed and seemingly infectious malady that strikes when the days lengthen and temperatures begin to climb, has been blamed for feverish bouts of house-cleaning, restless behavior in the classroom, distraction in meetings and love struck dazes. Some scientists think spring fever is more than just a colloquialism -- they think it's a constellation of symptoms brought about by hormonal changes in the body.
IMAGE
January 25, 2009 | BOOTH MOORE, FASHION CRITIC
Fashion's power to transport. That's what I look for at the runway shows, the kind of enchantment that breeds desire. It's what I crave in the gray days of winter too, right about this time of year when I get spring fever. But on a cold, crisp Paris day last October, I found it at a showroom on Rue du Faubourg St. Honore, where Vanessa Seward, artistic director of the under-the-radar French fashion house of Loris Azzaro, was hosting a presentation of her spring collection.
HEALTH
March 31, 2008 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Spring fever, that reputed and seemingly infectious malady that strikes when the days lengthen and temperatures begin to climb, has been blamed for feverish bouts of house-cleaning, restless behavior in the classroom, distraction in meetings and love struck dazes. Some scientists think spring fever is more than just a colloquialism -- they think it's a constellation of symptoms brought about by hormonal changes in the body.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2008 | Deborah Netburn, Times Staff Writer
Fanana Republic is a new column taking a look at pop culture fandom. Everything's coming up Jonas these days. Once a niche teeny-bopper act found on Radio Disney, the Jonas Brothers are currently crossing over from the kids' table and taking a seat alongside those financially viable enough to garner adult interest, thereby joining the ranks of the Olsen twins, Hilary Duff, team "High School Musical" and the ubiquitous Miley Cyrus.
OPINION
April 22, 2005
Have you ever paused on an April day and listened, really listened, to bird songs? Or whiffed the fragrance of flowers on the wind and sought the source? Have you suddenly felt the sun warmer on your face than recently, or noticed someone who seems more attractive this month? And, as a result, have you ever felt like sitting down to forget whatever you were doing and celebrate these little things a while? Well then, you've been infected by the benevolent virus of spring fever. And who hasn't?
HEALTH
April 18, 2005 | Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, Special to The Times
Responsive to the cuckoo's note, The untaught harmony of spring: While, whisp'ring pleasure as they fly, Cool Zephyrs thro' the clear blue sky Their gathered fragrance fling.... Thomas Gray, "Ode on the Spring" * Forget about odes to spring. Neuroscience has taken the magic, not to mention the mystery, out of the poetry. That surge of optimism? Merely the serotonergic response to increased daylight. The distraction and dreaminess? The neurotransmitter dopamine is responding to light and warmth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2005 | Stuart Silverstein and Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writers
As a new era of SAT scores dawned Monday, Carole Wampole was eager to learn her son's results on the recently revised college entrance exam. The Newport Coast businesswoman checked the website of the College Board, the owner of the SAT, through the night in hopes of getting an early peek at the scores. She succeeded shortly after 5 a.m. -- the time the College Board had announced it would post results -- but Wampole had few regrets about losing a night's sleep.
TRAVEL
May 12, 2002
I enjoyed Susan James' article ("Spring Fever in Tehachapi," April 28) about her weekend escape to Tehachapi. However, many other wonderful places to visit in this great little town also deserve mention. I recommend the Web site tehachapi.cc/museum to anyone planning a visit to Tehachapi. The site, maintained by the fabulously active Heritage League, includes information and links on local history and nearby Tomo Kahni State Park. In addition, several fairs and festivals are held each year in the valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2003 | CHRIS ERSKINE
On TV, Martha Stewart is making popovers on a kitchen island that is nearly as big as her substantial rear end. When the popovers are done, she scoops in butter and strawberry jam. She's a handsome woman, Martha Stewart, but her girth is beginning to frighten me. She is one popover away from not needing a mattress or a bed. "Like she needs another popover," I mumble. "Like you do?" says someone on the other side of the couch. Spring break. Spring forward.
SPORTS
March 14, 2003 | PETE THOMAS
Spring may still be a week away, but spring fever has already reached epidemic proportions south of the border and is working its way north. "Unusual? It's unheard of for this time of year, really," Jeff DeBuys, skipper of the Red Rooster III, said Wednesday of his encounter two weeks ago with a large school of albacore 340 miles south of his home port in San Diego.
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