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Spring Rolls

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NEWS
August 22, 2002 | Jessica Strand
* These rolls, wrapped in a sort of translucent rice tortilla, are crisp, chewy, tasty--and wholesome. Chan Dara: Inside the Saigon rolls are cellophane noodles, shrimp, tofu, alfalfa sprouts, shredded carrots and red leaf lettuce. A tamarind sauce sprinkled with chopped peanuts and minced onion comes on the side. (Saigon spring roll, $7.95.) Chan Dara, 310 N. Larchmont Blvd., Hancock Park, (323) 467-1052; 1511 N. Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 464-8585; 11940 W. Pico Blvd., West L.A.
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FOOD
December 5, 2013
Total time: 40 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 Note: Rice vermicelli and rice paper wrappers are available in well-stocked Asian sections of most supermarkets. Don't substitute blue crab meat for the Dungeness -- it has a very different flavor and won't work nearly as well. VIDEO: Watch this recipe being made. 1 head Belgian endive 1/4 pound Dungeness crab meat 3 tablespoons toasted slivered almonds 1/4 cup mayonnaise 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1/2 pound rice vermicelli Salt 1 package rice paper wrappers 1 bunch watercress, leaves only 1. Separate the Belgian endive into individual leaves, stack them into small bunches and slice them lengthwise into very thin slivers.
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FOOD
March 16, 2005
A class on making spring rolls is one of a series of workshops offered in different parts of the city highlighting wrapped foods of various cultures. A portion of the fee supports Chinatown art programs. * Cooking class: 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday. Chow Fun restaurant, 686 N. Spring St., L.A.. Sponsored by L.A. Commons. Call (213) 705-4457 or e-mail lacommons@aol.com. $50.
FOOD
October 7, 2010 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the hyperspecialized kitchens of Little Saigon, where dining by dac biet (a restaurant's prescribed list of house specialties) is almost a moral obligation, nem nuong cuon is a matter of contention. For every dozen batches of slack, sloppy spring rolls, there are a few that approach brilliance: ruddy pork patties branded by the grill, cucumber spears that snap with farmers-market freshness, dipping sauces derived from equal parts recipe and alchemy. Consensus has long steered the spring roll-obsessed to Brodard.
FOOD
February 11, 2004 | Cindy Dorn, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: The seafood caviar spring rolls at Matsuhisa are amazing. My husband and I enjoy them each year during our anniversary dinner there. I would love to surprise him and make them. Michelle Horwitch Los Angeles Dear Michelle: This unusual recipe calls for ingredients from all over the world. Feuilles de brick are North African pastry leaves made from flour, water, salt and sunflower seed oil. They can be purchased at Nicole's in South Pasadena and Surfas in Culver City.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1997
Spring is already in the air--and in the roll. With as many interpretations as there are chefs, Vietnamese-style spring rolls can be among the most refreshing and delicious of appetizers. * Golden Deli: This perennially packed San Gabriel Vietnamese restaurant has an excellent fresh spring roll, or goi cuon: rice vermicelli, lettuce, shrimp and pork wrapped in cool, supple rice paper skins and served with plum sauce ($2.75 for two). Similar are the bi cuon, filled with shredded pork ($2.75).
NEWS
April 11, 2002 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the Max: Chef Andre Guerrero, late of Linq in L.A., has just opened Max at the old JoeJoe's location in the Valley. His Cal-Asian menu includes his signature foie gras Napoleon ($14.50), and he's kept his mother's Filipino shrimp and pork spring rolls ($7.50). New items include tea-smoked salmon ($8.95), wok-sauteed filet mignon ($24) and a vegan platter with mushroom curry ($14.50). Max is now open for dinner nightly with lunch to come in May. Max, 13355 Ventura Blvd.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 1991 | Ruth Reichl
In a week of serious Southern California eating, only three things thrilled my visiting 16-year-old niece. The first was Granita--less for the food (although she did say that the lemon granita was "the best dessert I've ever eaten") than for the sight of Tom Hanks sitting at the next table. It was, she said, an important moment in her life.
FOOD
October 7, 2010 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the hyperspecialized kitchens of Little Saigon, where dining by dac biet (a restaurant's prescribed list of house specialties) is almost a moral obligation, nem nuong cuon is a matter of contention. For every dozen batches of slack, sloppy spring rolls, there are a few that approach brilliance: ruddy pork patties branded by the grill, cucumber spears that snap with farmers-market freshness, dipping sauces derived from equal parts recipe and alchemy. Consensus has long steered the spring roll-obsessed to Brodard.
NEWS
March 15, 2007 | Heidi Siegmund Cuda
Looking for eye candy to go with your culinary cravings? These club land hotspots fit the bill. Geisha House This piece of Pop art owned by the gents behind Les Deux, Dolce and Bella is the most daring design Hollywood's seen in some time. Its "ginormous" tower of fire, roving glammed-up geishas and combo of video art and simple rural materials (think bamboo and fishing nets) complement executive chef Genichi Mizoguchi's Japanese fare. * Steamed monkfish, $14. 6633 Hollywood Blvd.
NEWS
March 15, 2007 | Heidi Siegmund Cuda
Looking for eye candy to go with your culinary cravings? These club land hotspots fit the bill. Geisha House This piece of Pop art owned by the gents behind Les Deux, Dolce and Bella is the most daring design Hollywood's seen in some time. Its "ginormous" tower of fire, roving glammed-up geishas and combo of video art and simple rural materials (think bamboo and fishing nets) complement executive chef Genichi Mizoguchi's Japanese fare. * Steamed monkfish, $14. 6633 Hollywood Blvd.
FOOD
March 16, 2005
A class on making spring rolls is one of a series of workshops offered in different parts of the city highlighting wrapped foods of various cultures. A portion of the fee supports Chinatown art programs. * Cooking class: 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday. Chow Fun restaurant, 686 N. Spring St., L.A.. Sponsored by L.A. Commons. Call (213) 705-4457 or e-mail lacommons@aol.com. $50.
NEWS
November 4, 2004 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
It's no secret that Hideo Yamashiro of South Pasadena's Shiro restaurant has been itching to do something else -- something besides frying catfish all night long. Whole, deep-fried catfish with ponzu is, to his everlasting chagrin, the single most requested dish at Shiro. A few weeks ago, the Chinois alum, who goes by the name Shiro, broke out with a new restaurant on Sawtelle Boulevard in West Los Angeles.
SPORTS
May 23, 2004 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
Shaquille O'Neal took Karl Malone by the sleeve Saturday morning, on their break before Game 2 of the Western Conference finals, and asked him about this summer, about what they'd do together, how they'd get stronger together. "I always know he's serious when he grabs my arm," Malone said. "This morning he grabbed my arm." They have made it this far, going on a year since O'Neal started calling Malone in Arkansas, asking him to come to the Lakers and be his power forward.
FOOD
February 11, 2004 | Cindy Dorn, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: The seafood caviar spring rolls at Matsuhisa are amazing. My husband and I enjoy them each year during our anniversary dinner there. I would love to surprise him and make them. Michelle Horwitch Los Angeles Dear Michelle: This unusual recipe calls for ingredients from all over the world. Feuilles de brick are North African pastry leaves made from flour, water, salt and sunflower seed oil. They can be purchased at Nicole's in South Pasadena and Surfas in Culver City.
NEWS
August 22, 2002 | Jessica Strand
* These rolls, wrapped in a sort of translucent rice tortilla, are crisp, chewy, tasty--and wholesome. Chan Dara: Inside the Saigon rolls are cellophane noodles, shrimp, tofu, alfalfa sprouts, shredded carrots and red leaf lettuce. A tamarind sauce sprinkled with chopped peanuts and minced onion comes on the side. (Saigon spring roll, $7.95.) Chan Dara, 310 N. Larchmont Blvd., Hancock Park, (323) 467-1052; 1511 N. Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood, (323) 464-8585; 11940 W. Pico Blvd., West L.A.
FOOD
December 17, 1989 | BARBARA HANSEN
Not much information on Vietnamese cooking has been published, so those who have become acquainted with this light, vegetable-laden cuisine in restaurants should find this book interesting. The recipes cover many of the dishes commonly seen in Vietnamese eating places, among them pho bac, which is a north Vietnamese beef-noodle soup; cha gio (spring rolls), curry-flavored beef stew, grilled beef with lemon grass, charcoal broiled pork and, for dessert, fried bananas. This is a luxury book in the Stewart, Tabori & Chang tradition, with expertly styled photographs.
MAGAZINE
February 16, 1997 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
With Spago Chicago having opened a week before, Obachine, the latest restaurant concept from the indefatigable Wolfgang Puck, seemed like a ship adrift when it debuted in Beverly Hills in November. Executive chef Naoki Uchiyama and chef Chik Fong had been experimenting with dishes for the new venture months beforehand, but their crew hadn't melded into a cohesive unit by opening day. Now, happily, the mid-priced Asian restaurant and satay bar has found its focus.
NEWS
April 11, 2002 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the Max: Chef Andre Guerrero, late of Linq in L.A., has just opened Max at the old JoeJoe's location in the Valley. His Cal-Asian menu includes his signature foie gras Napoleon ($14.50), and he's kept his mother's Filipino shrimp and pork spring rolls ($7.50). New items include tea-smoked salmon ($8.95), wok-sauteed filet mignon ($24) and a vegan platter with mushroom curry ($14.50). Max is now open for dinner nightly with lunch to come in May. Max, 13355 Ventura Blvd.
MAGAZINE
May 18, 1997 | S. Irene Virbila
Michi's concrete facade is severely geometric, unadorned except for a mustard-yellow awning and the name spelled out in skinny copper letters. Manhattan Beach may be a sleepy beach town, but this 6-month-old restaurant has the sleek look of West Hollywood. Plus a menu that's just as familiar. Yet diners here are enthusiastic and as unjaded as they come, making the restaurant's East-West orientation seem thrilling and exotic.
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