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NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Carla Hall
The fading yet controversial green bike lane that stretches through downtown Los Angeles on Spring Street may be getting a fresh coat of paint that all - including the temperamental asphalt - can live with.  Bicyclists and downtown residents love the highly visible 1.4-mile bike lane that runs from Cesar Chavez to 9th Street. But film and TV location scouts hate the fluorescent green ribbon that runs through the heart of the most popular filming location in Los Angeles. Under bright lights, this particular green bounces off every surface it hits (including actors' faces)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Corina Knoll
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to pay a $500,000 settlement in a case centering on the 2011 death of a 2-month-old boy who was killed when a driver overran the curb and plowed into pedestrians during the Downtown Art Walk. In a 2012 legal complaint, Jimmy and Natasha Vasquez, of Montebello, alleged that their son's death was the result of the city's “failure to properly design and create safe walking areas for pedestrians and/or place sufficient barriers and protections for pedestrians from vehicles” at the downtown event.
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NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Carla Hall
The fluorescent green Spring Street bike lane that bicyclists and downtown residents loved but film location scouts and production managers hated has been stripped off the street. It's been repainted a darker shade of green. In fact, it looks more turquoise than green. That should make the film folks happy -- or at least, happier than when Spring Street, one of the most filmed and photographed locales in Los Angeles, featured a 1.4-mile strip of green so bright that under lights for filming it bounced off and tinted everything it touched, including actors' faces.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
It's been generations since a high-rise building had its debut on Broadway in downtown Los Angeles, but the skyline is finally in for a dramatic change. A local developer hopes to transform a homely corner of the city's famed commercial corridor early next year by leveling a drab one-story retail center at 4th Street and Broadway. In its place would be a 34-story apartment skyscraper more than twice as tall as most other buildings in the historic core of downtown L.A. To be built at a cost of nearly $150 million, the apartment and retail complex called Broadway @ 4th would house 450 units and fill in a key block in gentrifying downtown L.A., developer Izek Shomof said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
The film industry and the Los Angeles bicycling community reached a compromise Wednesday on the future of a controversial, bright green bike lane in downtown Los Angeles. Under a motion passed by the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday, what is currently a vivid ribbon of color will be scraped off and replaced with less paint in a more muted shade. The design, which would be experimental, must still be approved by the state . "Downtown Los Angeles is undergoing a transformation," said Councilman Jose Huizar , who proposed the action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1998 | PATT MORRISON, Patt Morrison's column appears Wednesdays. Her e-mail address is patt.morrison@latimes.com
Tom Bradley was my FDR. As Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the president who soloed on the political stage of my parents' youth, Tom Bradley was my mayor aeternus, the perpetual presence in Los Angeles City Hall; for 20 years, from my days as a new kid in town until I was a taxpaying, property-owning grown-up, I knew no other.
REAL ESTATE
April 2, 1989
The Spring Street complex known for years as Title Insurance & Trust headquarters and more recently as the Los Angeles Design Center, has been sold to a partnership with offices in Santa Monica for an estimated $25 million. Twin Springs & L.P., Delaware Ltd. Partnership was the buyer. Principals are Larry Bond, Al Ehringer and Kirk von Meeteren. Ehringer said "no comment" when asked about a rumor that actor Arnold Schwarzenegger is also an investor.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1986 | BILL SING
Cheering and tossing papers into the air, traders on the Pacific Stock Exchange on Friday celebrated the exchange's final closing at its 54-year-old location at 618 S. Spring St. On Monday, the exchange will begin operations at its new $5-million facility in the Beaudry Center II building at 233 S. Beaudry Ave.
REAL ESTATE
October 12, 1986 | DAVID M. KINCHEN, Times Staff Writer
I hurry past the intersection of 4th and Spring streets on my downtown walks these days: There is no reason to slow down any more. An old friend died at the southeast corner earlier this year, and I don't even want to think about it. The friend was a store, an 80-year-old camera store called Earl V. Lewis Cameras.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Aside from the usual battles of the buck all theaters have to wage, the Los Angeles Theatre Center has had to combat its downtown location. From the start everyone connected with LATC knew that Spring Street was a tough area. When the Community Redevelopment Agency helped establish the LATC complex in 1985, it counted on the presence of the theater to help tame the neighborhood. It has, and it hasn't.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Nicholas Goldberg
It's been three months now since the city of Los Angeles, in its wisdom, slapped down the new, controversial bicycle lanes in the 2nd Street tunnel. Where there used to be four lanes of car traffic moving smoothly in both directions, there are now only two, plus a bike lane on either side. This is part of the city's ongoing efforts to make Los Angeles more bike-friendly. At the moment, there are about 350 miles of bike lanes in the city, among some 6,500 miles of streets. So how's it working out?
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has inadvertently stepped into - or should we say, driven into - L.A.'s jaywalking ticket controversy. On Tuesday, the mayor was being driven to City Hall when his official car, a black SUV, struck a pedestrian on Second Street near Spring Street. The woman in her 60s was taken to the hospital as a precaution. The mayor was on the phone at the time and apparently didn't see the accident. The collision comes a few weeks after the Downtown News first reported on a jaywalking crackdown in the city's Historic Core and the Financial District, in which Los Angeles police officers are ticketing walkers who step into the street during the “countdown.” What many walkers (including me)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan and David Zahniser
A pedestrian in her 60s was hospitalized Tuesday after being struck by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti's vehicle in downtown Los Angeles, according to the mayor's office. Garcetti was in the car, speaking on the phone, when the accident occurred, according to a written statement released by his office. He did not see what happened, the statement said. "I'm very concerned about her and wish her a speedy recovery,” Garcetti said. "I look forward to speaking with her soon. " The police vehicle in which Garcetti was riding was heading east on Second Street near Spring Street, on the way to City Hall.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Carla Hall
The fluorescent green Spring Street bike lane that bicyclists and downtown residents loved but film location scouts and production managers hated has been stripped off the street. It's been repainted a darker shade of green. In fact, it looks more turquoise than green. That should make the film folks happy -- or at least, happier than when Spring Street, one of the most filmed and photographed locales in Los Angeles, featured a 1.4-mile strip of green so bright that under lights for filming it bounced off and tinted everything it touched, including actors' faces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy
In 2008, Carlos Morales, an El Sereno, Calif., resident, weighed 400 pounds. Today, he weighs 200 pounds and is not only a CicLAvia participant but an enthusiastic cyclist who rides his bike 1,000 miles a month. “Cycling is my passion, it saved my life,” said the 53-year-old Morales, who was among thousands who participated in Sunday's bike festival centered in downtown Los Angeles. Joined by fellow members of the East Side Bike Club, founded in June 2008, Morales cycled on what he nicknamed the “10-footer” bike because five people pedal it at once.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
First it was bright green. Now it's darker. City officials said this week that crews were in the middle of reapplying the green paint that once boldly defined the 1.5-mile long bike lane that runs down Spring Street from Cesar Chavez Avenue to 9th Street in downtown Los Angeles. Bicyclists claimed the bright-green lane was helpful in defining the path to motorists. But after a prolonged bout with some in Hollywood who claimed the lane's bright color made location filming difficult, and with new marching orders from the Los Angeles City Council, the lane is now being painted a bit differently and in a darker shade of green, a type of forest green.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
CicLAvia, the nonprofit that stages popular car-free events on major Los Angeles streets, has received a $500,000 grant to hold more events over the next two years, the organization told The Times.  The grant from the Wasserman Foundation is CicLAvia's largest to date. During each daylong event, one or more major streets are closed to cars but kept open to bicyclists and pedestrians . "This pledge is an affirmation of our commitment to enhance and expand CicLAvia throughout the Los Angeles landscape in the coming years," Aaron Paley, the group's executive director, said in a statement.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt
It would be hard to miss the traffic-stopping yellow Kate Spade Saturday store with its graphic black-and-white walkway on 3rd Street. Last Saturday a flurry of vibrant yellow flags marked the opening of this second U.S. location for Kate Spade's little sister brand, which aims to target 25- to 30-year-old women. Launched in February, the brand currently has six stores in Japan and one in New York City; a third U.S. store is set to open near Rice University in Houston on Friday and a fourth hits New York City's Spring Street in November.
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