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June 19, 1987 | Associated Press
The City Council and lawyers for black residents on Thursday presented a federal judge with a compromise plan to phase out the city's commission government by 1991, moving to end a bitter struggle over political bias. The plan must be approved by U.S. District Judge Harold Baker, but spokesmen for both sides said it would settle a 2-year-old lawsuit over racial divisions in Abraham Lincoln's hometown.
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NEWS
June 19, 1987 | Associated Press
The City Council and lawyers for black residents on Thursday presented a federal judge with a compromise plan to phase out the city's commission government by 1991, moving to end a bitter struggle over political bias. The plan must be approved by U.S. District Judge Harold Baker, but spokesmen for both sides said it would settle a 2-year-old lawsuit over racial divisions in Abraham Lincoln's hometown.
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NEWS
May 17, 1987
A U.S. judge will impose a new city government on Springfield, Ill., next month if blacks and the all-white City Council cannot compromise. No blacks have been elected to the council in Abraham Lincoln's hometown despite making up 11% of Springfield's 100,000 residents, and U.S. District Judge Harold Baker ruled that the citywide election system dilutes black voting strength.
NEWS
May 17, 1987
A U.S. judge will impose a new city government on Springfield, Ill., next month if blacks and the all-white City Council cannot compromise. No blacks have been elected to the council in Abraham Lincoln's hometown despite making up 11% of Springfield's 100,000 residents, and U.S. District Judge Harold Baker ruled that the citywide election system dilutes black voting strength.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2007 | Bob Secter and Rick Pearson, Chicago Tribune
Forget Lincoln. Illinois' state capital, renowned for its ties to Honest Abe and other less-honest politicians, now wants to be known as the home of Homer Simpson. Like many things these days, this has to do with dough -- or, in this case, perhaps, D'oh! "The Simpsons," the television cartoon satire that inspired cult-like loyalty among millions of viewers worldwide over its 18 years, is set in a never clearly defined but incredibly dysfunctional place called Springfield.
TRAVEL
May 19, 1996
When planning your trip and requesting travel literature, be as specific as possible. ALABAMA: Alabama Bureau of Tourism and Travel, 401 Adams Ave., Suite 126, Montgomery, AL 36104; (800) 252-2262 or (334) 242-4169.6 ALASKA: Alaska Division of Tourism, P.O. Box 110801, Juneau, AK 99811-0801; 907-465-2010. ARIZONA: Arizona Office of Tourism, 2702 N. 3rd St. Suite 4015, Phoenix, AZ 85004; (602) 230-7733. ARKANSAS: Arkansas Tourism Office, One Capitol Mall, Dept.
TRAVEL
March 29, 1998
Most states and U.S. territories have tourism offices to provide assistance to visitors. If requesting travel literature, be as specific as possible. ALABAMA: Alabama Bureau of Tourism and Travel, 401 Adams Ave., Suite 126, Montgomery, AL 36104; telephone (800) 252-2262 or (334) 242-4169, fax (334) 242-4554, Internet http://www.touralabama.org. ALASKA: Alaska Division of Tourism, P.O. Box 110801, Juneau, AK 99811-0801; tel. (907) 465-2010, fax (907) 465-2287, Internet http://www.travelalaska.
TRAVEL
February 19, 2006 | Fred Dickey, Special to The Times
FOR the last couple of generations, all U.S. presidents -- even the ones who don't move the needle on the greatness scale -- end up with grand libraries and museums. But for 140 years, Abraham Lincoln, the man many consider the greatest U.S. president, lacked even a modest edifice that chronicled the leadership that led to freedom for millions -- and, ultimately, to his death.
TRAVEL
February 17, 2002 | GREG BAILEY
Abraham Lincoln once heard that a pastor in town planned to preach a sermon on the second coming of the Lord, to which the president replied: If the Lord had been to Springfield once, he probably wouldn't be back again. But Lincoln loved the city, and with good reason. He arrived in town in 1837, unknown and penniless, and left as president-elect.
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