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NEWS
August 21, 1994 | STEVE WILSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Strong, lithe and vivacious, Christy Henrich spent years spinning, leaping and vaulting across balance beams, around parallel bars and over padded mats, a muscular sprite nicknamed "E.T." for Extra Tough. That seems impossibly long ago. On July 26, withered to little more than a fragile skeleton, her papery skin a ghostly gray-white, her gums and kidneys bleeding, her throat ulcerated, her heart barely pumping, Henrich died of multiple organ failure. She was 22 and weighed less than 60 pounds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | Michael Kurcfeld, Kurcfeld is a Los Angeles-based arts writer who has recently focused on Japanese contemporary culture. and
Like a Nike ad, Saburo Teshigawara has a thing about air. Air as the medium of dance. Air as a metaphor for the physical rendered into spirit. Air as the realm of reverie. Air as a gas that mutates as freely as Teshigawara on an open stage. In a poem, he coins the phrase "architecturing atmospheres," which could be an eloquent stab at his own job description.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Natasha Saum settled on her bed. Above her, eight pairs of worn pink ballet slippers hung down side by side. Ballet slippers danced around her room on the wallpaper. "Ballet is my life," she said with finality. It's no exaggeration. Now 14, she's studied ballet at the Channel Islands Ballet Academie in Oxnard since she was 4. She wants to become a professional ballerina, and later this month, she will have a chance to dance with the pros.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2007 | Susan King
Lara MacLean Puppet wrangler Current credit: The Disney Channel's "Johnny and the Sprites," a series for preschoolers featuring puppets, starring and executive produced by Tony Award-nominated John Tartaglia of Broadway's "Avenue Q." Previous credits: "Sesame Street" Awards: Two-time Emmy winner for puppet styling for "Sesame Street."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1995 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scientists at the University of Alaska have finally proved something commercial pilots have known for years: The atmosphere above thunderstorms can be even more spectacular than the lightning below, with blue and red flashes of light that seem to explode across the night sky. Pilots have reported seeing bright flashes of colored lights above thunderstorms, but scientists have never been in the right spot at the right time with the right equipment...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1995 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scientists at the University of Alaska have finally proved something commercial pilots have known for years: The atmosphere above thunderstorms can be even more spectacular than the lightning below, with blue and red flashes of light that seem to explode across the night sky. Pilots have reported seeing bright flashes of colored lights above thunderstorms, but scientists have never been in the right spot at the right time with the right equipment...
FOOD
May 26, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Shrubs - they're not just for hiding in! Tart, acidic and weirdly, wonderfully refreshing, drinking vinegars known as "shrubs" are finding a savory home on a growing number of Los Angeles drink menus. Sometimes they're added to soda water as an alternative to mainstream sodas, and sometimes they're mixed with booze as a mouth-pleasing alternative to predictable acids such as lemons and limes. Either way, they're adding a welcome new dimension to the ever-evolving Los Angeles craft cocktail scene.
WORLD
August 11, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
LUJAN, Argentina - Manu Peclat, a tourist from Brazil, had already fed vegetables to elephants, thrown fish to seals and posed for pictures with two white tigers. Now it was time for the bears. A zookeeper unlocked a gate and led Peclat and a few other visitors inside. After trading chunks of raw sweet potato for pesos, the keeper roused 3-year-old Gordo from his slumber. The brown bear languidly lumbered over. Peclat held out his hand and Gordo gently gobbled up the snacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
For 10 years, Walt Disney Co. and McDonald's appeared to have the perfect marriage. Happy Meals bore little figurines of Nemo, Mr. Incredible and 101 Dalmatians. But no more. This is one relationship that's ending in part because of the children. Disney is not renewing its cross-promotional pact with the fast-food giant, ending the arrangement with this summer's release of "Cars" and "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest."
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