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Spruce Goose Airplane

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1992 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The legendary Spruce Goose, a symbol of magnificence in aviation history, will be moved from its lifelong berth in Long Beach to McMinnville, Ore., its owners decided Thursday night. The world's largest aircraft will become a centerpiece for a new museum of historic planes planned by Evergreen International Aviation Inc. Board members of the Aero Club of Southern California, which owns the plane built by the late billionaire Howard Hughes, voted unanimously to send the aircraft to Oregon.
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NEWS
November 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Nearly a decade after it was disassembled, the world's largest wooden airplane has gotten its wings back. The Spruce Goose--designed by billionaire eccentric Howard Hughes--will be the star exhibit at the Evergreen Aviation Museum in McMinnville, southwest of Portland, which is to open by spring. The 219-foot-long flying boat has been undergoing restoration at Evergreen International Aviation since 1992, when Evergreen founder Del Smith decided to give the massive troop carrier a permanent home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1993
What do you do with a huge dome built next to the Queen Mary to shelter a one-of-a-kind giant seaplane that flew the coop? Use it as a stage for a science fiction film, say French movie makers. BYFG Productions has rented the dome for eight months to build a space station set for the film "Star Gate," starring Kurt Russell. The 150-foot-tall dome on a pier near the Queen Mary's stern has been empty since the behemoth Spruce Goose was shipped to Oregon in October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1993
What do you do with a huge dome built next to the Queen Mary to shelter a one-of-a-kind giant seaplane that flew the coop? Use it as a stage for a science fiction film, say French movie makers. BYFG Productions has rented the dome for eight months to build a space station set for the film "Star Gate," starring Kurt Russell. The 150-foot-tall dome on a pier near the Queen Mary's stern has been empty since the behemoth Spruce Goose was shipped to Oregon in October.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1992
The Queen Mary attraction in Long Beach received a boost this week when the Long Beach City Council recommended that the luxury liner remain open. The council voted 6 to 3 Tuesday to recommend that the city's Board of Harbor Commissioners fund the liner and its facilities, including the Spruce Goose, while officials find a new operator or determine what would replace the attraction on the site.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | Associated Press
The disassembled Spruce Goose traveled the final mile to the site of its yet-to-be-built new home, the Evergreen AirVenture Museum. In all, the behemoth has journeyed 1,055 miles by ship, barge and truck from Long Beach, a trip that took 138 days. About 10,000 people watched Saturday as the caravan--consisting of the airplane's fuselage, tail section and wings--came to rest next to the McMinnville Airport, said Howard Lovering, director of the planned museum.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL and ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Walt Disney Co. announced Friday that it is pulling out of its Long Beach operation at the Queen Mary and Spruce Goose, throwing the future of the famed tourist attractions in doubt and extinguishing the city's hopes that Disney would develop part of the local waterfront. Disney's departure comes on the heels of its decision last December to abandon plans for building a major theme park on the Queen Mary site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co.'s decision to pack up and leave town has left Long Beach in a swirl of fault-finding and questions--about what went wrong and what to do next.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1992 | Times researcher MICHAEL MEYERS
Long Beach's Spruce Goose is being carved up to be shipped piece by piece to its new location in Oregon. The world's largest plane, built by the late billionaire Howard Hughes between 1942 and 1946 and flown only once, will be reassembled and displayed as the centerpiece of the new Evergreen AirVenture Museum in McMinnville. The wooden plane is credited with contributing to the development of jumbo aircraft with large lift capabilities.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in the new home of the Spruce Goose, everybody knows about it, even kids. Some of them just are not exactly sure what it is. "I think I heard it was a goose," guessed fifth-grader Austin Moorhead as he paused on the turn-of-the-century main street of McMinnville's downtown last month, liberated from class by a balmy, autumn teachers day. "It's supposed to be like a restaurant," volunteered eighth-grader Jennifer Whitlow as she and her friends decapitated ice cream cones from Aunt Aggie's.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | Associated Press
The disassembled Spruce Goose traveled the final mile to the site of its yet-to-be-built new home, the Evergreen AirVenture Museum. In all, the behemoth has journeyed 1,055 miles by ship, barge and truck from Long Beach, a trip that took 138 days. About 10,000 people watched Saturday as the caravan--consisting of the airplane's fuselage, tail section and wings--came to rest next to the McMinnville Airport, said Howard Lovering, director of the planned museum.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in the new home of the Spruce Goose, everybody knows about it, even kids. Some of them just are not exactly sure what it is. "I think I heard it was a goose," guessed fifth-grader Austin Moorhead as he paused on the turn-of-the-century main street of McMinnville's downtown last month, liberated from class by a balmy, autumn teachers day. "It's supposed to be like a restaurant," volunteered eighth-grader Jennifer Whitlow as she and her friends decapitated ice cream cones from Aunt Aggie's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a two-day delay caused by rough seas, workers Sunday succeeded in loading the fuselage and tail section of the legendary Spruce Goose onto a barge before starting its journey up the Pacific Coast to an as-yet-unbuilt air museum in Oregon. Onlookers lined Queens Highway in Long Beach as the 100-by-300-foot barge was tugged into the San Pedro Harbor, where the shrink-wrapped parts were to be lashed for the 1,000-mile ride.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1992 | Times researcher MICHAEL MEYERS
Long Beach's Spruce Goose is being carved up to be shipped piece by piece to its new location in Oregon. The world's largest plane, built by the late billionaire Howard Hughes between 1942 and 1946 and flown only once, will be reassembled and displayed as the centerpiece of the new Evergreen AirVenture Museum in McMinnville. The wooden plane is credited with contributing to the development of jumbo aircraft with large lift capabilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1992 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like protective parents sending their firstborn off to college, members of the Aero Club of Southern California confessed that they were a little melancholy Thursday night when they gathered for the last time around the legendary Spruce Goose. But for the original flight mechanics and crew members of the world's largest aircraft, the impending transition from Long Beach tourist attraction to crown jewel of an Oregon air museum was something of a relief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1992 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The legendary Spruce Goose, a symbol of magnificence in aviation history, will be moved from its lifelong berth in Long Beach to McMinnville, Ore., its owners decided Thursday night. The world's largest aircraft will become a centerpiece for a new museum of historic planes planned by Evergreen International Aviation Inc. Board members of the Aero Club of Southern California, which owns the plane built by the late billionaire Howard Hughes, voted unanimously to send the aircraft to Oregon.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Howard Hughes' fantastic flying machine, the Spruce Goose, seemingly has spent its entire star-crossed career trying to recapture its one golden moment in the sun. The question now is whether the massive seaplane, its wings clipped long ago, can survive at all. Preliminary plans unveiled last week by the Walt Disney Co. for a $2-billion resort and theme park in Long Beach exclude the historic flying boat now housed on the 300-acre proposed site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owners of the fabled Spruce Goose said Tuesday that they plan to move the world's largest airplane from Long Beach, its home for 45 years. The wooden plane, now displayed under a giant dome near the ocean liner Queen Mary, may be moved to Oregon, Florida, Las Vegas or Oceanside, Calif., according to William Shoneberger, president of Aero Exhibits Inc., the aircraft's owner. Shoneberger's company has been searching for a new site since the Walt Disney Co.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1992
The Queen Mary attraction in Long Beach received a boost this week when the Long Beach City Council recommended that the luxury liner remain open. The council voted 6 to 3 Tuesday to recommend that the city's Board of Harbor Commissioners fund the liner and its facilities, including the Spruce Goose, while officials find a new operator or determine what would replace the attraction on the site.
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