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BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
CompuServe Inc. Agrees to Buy Spry Inc.: The on-line service has agreed to acquire Seattle-based Spry, a provider of Internet access applications, for $100 million in cash and stock, CompuServe's parent H&R Block Inc. said. Spry will become the CompuServe Internet services division and it will be headed by Spry President and founder David Pool, who will become an executive vice president of Columbus, Ohio-based CompuServe, Block said. The transaction is expected to close within 30 days.
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BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
CompuServe Inc. Agrees to Buy Spry Inc.: The on-line service has agreed to acquire Seattle-based Spry, a provider of Internet access applications, for $100 million in cash and stock, CompuServe's parent H&R Block Inc. said. Spry will become the CompuServe Internet services division and it will be headed by Spry President and founder David Pool, who will become an executive vice president of Columbus, Ohio-based CompuServe, Block said. The transaction is expected to close within 30 days.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
H&R Block 4th-Quarter Profits Dip 47%: For the three months ended April 30, H&R Block Inc. earned $103.3 million, or 98 cents per share, compared to earnings of $194.3 million, or $1.81 per share, for that quarter a year ago. Revenue for the quarter was $774 million, close to the $774.7 million figure for the quarter last year. The Kansas City, Mo.-based company attributed the earnings fall to its $101.9-million acquisition of Spry Inc., a leading Internet software company, in April.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
CompuServe, one of the nation's largest on-line services, will broaden the access it provides to the Internet and invest more than $300 million in new equipment, software and security, the company said Monday. CompuServe will allow its 2 million subscribers three hours of access to the Internet as part of its regular $9.95 monthly fee. Additional time will be available for $2.50 an hour, the company said.
MAGAZINE
April 9, 1995 | Emily Gest
The experience is both fresh and familiar. A few clicks of the computer keys and you're on the Internet. A few more and you're in the World Wide Web, where the Net's text-dominated world, usually silent, stark and still, becomes a minefield of sights and sounds. Once largely the domain of scientists and engineers, the Web is becoming a showcase for a cadre of artists, intellectuals and Everymen who are creating a new kind of interactive multimedia art.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
Two companies today plan to announce new software that allows personal computer users to connect directly to the Internet, the world's largest public computer network. Originally funded by the National Science Foundation to connect universities and government agencies, the Internet is now used by an estimated 20 million people. Many go through commercial on-line computer services such as Compuserve, America Online and other "gateway" providers.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Sears, Roebuck & Co. and International Business Machines Corp. are considering selling their 50% stakes in Prodigy Services Co., after investing more than $1 billion over 10 years in the flagging online business, sources from both companies said. IBM is also considering buying Sears' half of the business, said a source who works for IBM. Sears, which has retained Goldman, Sachs & Co.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Clark is late for a meeting, and Marc Andreessen--boy wonder, cyberspace star, author of a computer program that inspired Clark to sink $5 million of his own money into a new company bent on commercializing it--is threatening to strip off his clothes. "I'll be there in a moment," the avuncular Clark keeps saying, a line that--and he appears to know this--only further infuriates the impatient 23-year-old computer geek-cum-vice president.
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