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Spud Murphy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2005 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Lyle "Spud" Murphy, the composer, arranger, bandleader and teacher who created music for acts as varied as the Three Stooges and bandleader Benny Goodman, but was perhaps best known for a system for composing that is widely used by professional musicians, has died. He was 96. Murphy died Aug. 5 at Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital of complications from recent surgery, colleagues told The Times. Murphy's resume was varied as well as accomplished.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2005 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Lyle "Spud" Murphy, the composer, arranger, bandleader and teacher who created music for acts as varied as the Three Stooges and bandleader Benny Goodman, but was perhaps best known for a system for composing that is widely used by professional musicians, has died. He was 96. Murphy died Aug. 5 at Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital of complications from recent surgery, colleagues told The Times. Murphy's resume was varied as well as accomplished.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's something about Spud Murphy that has struck a chord with three generations of Hollywood music composers. Part of it, of course, is Murphy's willingness to share his unusual technique of music composition that takes place in your head over a desk instead of through your fingers at a piano. But a lot of it is Murphy's quick wit, his photographic memory and his ability to move as easily with those playing symphonic music as with those doing cartoon movie tunes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's something about Spud Murphy that has struck a chord with three generations of Hollywood music composers. Part of it, of course, is Murphy's willingness to share his unusual technique of music composition that takes place in your head over a desk instead of through your fingers at a piano. But a lot of it is Murphy's quick wit, his photographic memory and his ability to move as easily with those playing symphonic music as with those doing cartoon movie tunes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1989 | H. G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
William (Murf) Murphy, owner of a popular downtown boxing gym, has been down on the canvas before. Looking back on a career that included more than 200 professional fights during the 1940s and 1950s, he is the first to admit, "I was never a great fighter." But somehow, "Irish Billy" Murphy--as he was known in his fighting days--always managed to get back on his feet and clinch or backpedal to survive the round, if not the fight.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
What is so rare as a sax team in harmony? The use of four reed experts as the centerpiece (at times the entirety) of a jazz group can produce inspired and refreshing results. This was handily demonstrated by Ira Schulman when he brought his Four Winds group to Linda's on Melrose Avenue on Saturday. Leading on soprano saxophone, Schulman heads a foursome that includes Ann Patterson on alto, Buck Gardner on tenor and Charles Owens on baritone.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mora's Modern Rhythmists have the look and the manner of a band tapped into the recent swing-revival fad. And when the curtain went up for their program at CSUN's Performing Arts Center on Sunday--hosted by "The Swingin' Years" radio show disc jockey Chuck Cecil--the tuxedo-clad players could easily have been kicking off a dance set at the old Palomar Ballroom. But bandleader Dean Mora, despite his ebullient manner and black-and-white wingtip shoes, had other plans in mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1992 | TONY PERRY
Just why the heavyweight boxing champion of the world thinks his purloined trunks are in San Diego is a bit foggy. But the point is that the champ does think they're in San Diego, and he wants them back very badly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
"It was overwhelming!" That's the way trumpeter Conte Candoli, a longtime member of Doc Severinsen's "Tonight Show" Orchestra who has also played with Woody Herman, Stan Kenton, Howard Rumsey's Lighthouse All-Stars and Shelly Manne and His Men in his four-decade career, enthusiastically recounted the goings-on Sunday, when he was presented with the Los Angeles Jazz Society's 8th annual Tribute Award at a gala concert in the Pacific Ballroom of the Los Angeles Hilton Hotel and Towers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been said that jazz is the sound of surprise, and pianist Gerald Wiggins agrees. "I don't like to rehearse," said Wiggins, 70, by phone from the home in Woodland Hills he shares with his wife, Lynn. "Then it's controlled. I think jazz should more or less be spontaneous." Spontaneity will be the watchword when the pianist and saxophonist Bob Cooper appear at Maxwell's on Friday and Saturday with bassist Jim de Julio and drummer Jimmy Dee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1989 | H. G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
William (Murf) Murphy, owner of a popular downtown boxing gym, has been down on the canvas before. Looking back on a career that included more than 200 professional fights during the 1940s and 1950s, he is the first to admit, "I was never a great fighter." But somehow, "Irish Billy" Murphy--as he was known in his fighting days--always managed to get back on his feet and clinch or backpedal to survive the round, if not the fight.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Patrice Rushen, the pixie-sized jazz-oriented keyboardist has been named musical director of "The Midnight Hour." The CBS network show, which tapes in studio 42 of CBS' Television City in Los Angeles, is an eight-week summer fill-in late-night talk show that replaces "The Pat Sajak Show" and airs Mon.-Fri., 12:40-1:40 a.m. on KCBS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1992 | TONY PERRY
In a year or so, the public will know what Paul Vaden is made of. Vaden also will know. He'll know whether he's got the stuff to be a champion or whether he's going to join the workaday world like the rest of us. Paul Vaden is a graduate of Patrick Henry High School, a devout Baptist, a polite and studious man who will soon turn 25. He's also a good junior-middleweight boxer (155 pounds). But there are lots of good boxers who are driving trucks or working for Parks and Recreation.
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