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Sputnik

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BUSINESS
January 30, 2011 | By Don Lee and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
In his State of the Union call to revitalize the economy, President Obama suggested that Americans today face a new "Sputnik moment" ? the challenge of another foreign superpower bent on domination. Just as a complacent America was jolted into action when the Soviet Union launched the first Earth-orbiting satellite in the 1950s, Obama warned, today the nation must rise to the challenge of an economically expansionist China. It was a potentially powerful appeal, aimed at both pride and fear: China, not the long-dominant U.S., has the fastest computer and the fastest trains.
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OPINION
January 31, 2011 | Gregory Rodriguez
President Obama's resurrection of Cold War iconography in last week's State of the Union address ? calling for a new "Sputnik moment" that would inspire American workers to "win the future" ? sounded a lot like old-fashioned "America First" rhetoric and not so much like a leader in the new globalized world order. Of course, the State of the Union is a showcase speech for domestic concerns. Even so, you'd expect at least an echo of the internationalist, "we're all members of the human family" fervor that was so evident in Obama's 2008 campaign and his early days of the presidency.
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NEWS
October 3, 1987 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
The message was little more than a series of haunting "beeps," but it sent scientists around the world scurrying for their radio receivers to see for themselves if the Soviet Union indeed had launched the first man-made satellite. At about the same time, the United States was gearing up to launch the first payload into orbit, and few had taken the Soviet Union's upstart space program seriously.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2011 | By Don Lee and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
In his State of the Union call to revitalize the economy, President Obama suggested that Americans today face a new "Sputnik moment" ? the challenge of another foreign superpower bent on domination. Just as a complacent America was jolted into action when the Soviet Union launched the first Earth-orbiting satellite in the 1950s, Obama warned, today the nation must rise to the challenge of an economically expansionist China. It was a potentially powerful appeal, aimed at both pride and fear: China, not the long-dominant U.S., has the fastest computer and the fastest trains.
MAGAZINE
April 27, 1986 | JACQUELYN GROSS, Jacquelyn Gross, a Los Angeles reading specialist, holds five teaching and administrative credentials for both regular and special education, as well as a doctorate in curriculum. Her book, "Make Your Child a Lifelong Reader," from which this is adapted, will be published next month by J. P. Tarcher Inc.
As a society, we've always assumed that parents would provide food and shelter for their children, and the schools would teach them to read. As matters stand today, that assumption is no longer realistic. Instead, the evidence powerfully suggests that most of the children in America's schools today won't become lifelong readers and--to use a conservative estimate--that one out of four of them will scarcely learn to read at all.
SCIENCE
August 9, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Even viruses can suffer a viral infection, French scientists reported Thursday in the journal Nature in a discovery that may help explain how viruses swap genes and evolve so rapidly. A new strain of giant virus was isolated from a cooling tower in Paris and found to be infected by a smaller type of virus, named Sputnik, after the first man-made satellite. Sputnik is the first example of a virus infecting another virus to make it sick. The finding may shed light on how viruses mutate so quickly, a feature that can make them difficult to tackle with drugs and vaccines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999
It was October 1957 and the world's first artificial satellite, Sputnik, had been successfully launched by the Soviets. I remember that cool and clear night vividly. I was a 7-year-old boy sitting on the warm hood of the family car next to my parents and uncle, scanning the heavens for a glimpse of Sputnik's sun-reflecting visage. Most of the neighbors were also outside, and I could sense their awe and perhaps some fear as well. Someone across the street shouted, "There it is!" There it was indeed, a slow-moving but discernible point of light that, once spotted, clearly stood out from the motionless stars and blinking aircraft.
NEWS
June 9, 1986 | MARIA L. La GANGA and STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writers
It was 1962, and the Space Race had commandeered world consciousness. The Soviet satellite Sputnik had been launched and two men had already been catapulted into the heavens. In Anaheim, businessman Al Stovall decided to launch his own space program with Stovall's Space Age Lodge, the first in a celestial chain of motels clustered around Disneyland like planets around the sun. The lodge's poolside cabana was a silver geodesic dome called "the Moon House."
MAGAZINE
April 26, 1998 | Daniel Nussbaum
Each word is taken from the vanity plate master list issued by the DMV* * IARIVD ONERTH BEE4 SPUTNIC WENTE N2ORBT. B4 PROZAC. BEFORE VIDTAPE, POLYSTR, DGTLSND. WHENNNN IWASA YNGSTR PEEPL DYD LISTN2 PATTI PAGE--ON 78S. TEFLON WAS SSOM CRAKPOT DREEME. EVRY1 DIDDIE WITH THER ORIGNEL LIVERR. IMOLD. * VELCRO. CLONED SHEEEP. NONFAT CHEEEZ. FRNKLEE ICOULD TKTRLVT. NDA FIFTYS, SUMHOWE WE SUR5D. NO1HD AU2MATQ FOKUS KAMERAS. WEHAD2 FOCUS OURSELF! ITT WSNTEZY.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Ray Wilson will tell you that two careers in front of the television cameras are better than one--especially if you want to keep your mug on the tube for more than three decades, as he has done. Wilson began his first on-camera career in 1953 as the straight-faced anchorman of San Diego's first nightly half-hour newscast, on KFMB-TV (Channel 8).
SCIENCE
August 9, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Even viruses can suffer a viral infection, French scientists reported Thursday in the journal Nature in a discovery that may help explain how viruses swap genes and evolve so rapidly. A new strain of giant virus was isolated from a cooling tower in Paris and found to be infected by a smaller type of virus, named Sputnik, after the first man-made satellite. Sputnik is the first example of a virus infecting another virus to make it sick. The finding may shed light on how viruses mutate so quickly, a feature that can make them difficult to tackle with drugs and vaccines.
OPINION
January 30, 2008 | Michael D'Antonio, Michael D'Antonio is the author, most recently, of "A Ball, a Dog, and a Monkey: 1957 -- The Space Race Begins."
Fifty years ago tomorrow, the United States launched its first satellite, Explorer 1, into orbit. Its success may seem to be a footnote in space history, a second-place finish to the Soviet Union's Sputnik. After all, wasn't it Sputnik, launched four months earlier, that represented the real scientific breakthrough and sent Americans cowering in fear at the shiny Russian ball orbiting overhead? Not exactly.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2007
To those pseudo-conservatives who complain that Google's logo recognized the anniversary of the Soviets' Sputnik launch, ("Logo tweak sends critics into orbit," Oct. 9), I would like to point out that NASA also recognizes the anniversaries of Sputnik and the first man in space, Russian Yuri Gagarin. In fact, NASA's chief administrator, Michael Griffin, traveled to Moscow to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the launch.
NEWS
October 7, 2007 | Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
washington -- With a series of small beeps from a spiky globe 50 years ago, the world shrank and humanity's view of Earth and the cosmos expanded. Sputnik, the first artificial satellite, was launched by the Soviets and circled the globe Oct. 4, 1957. The Space Age was born, and changes to everyday life followed. Now, we take those changes for granted. What we see on television, how we communicate with one other, and how we pay for what we buy all have changed since the birth of satellites.
OPINION
October 4, 2007
'Let's not make too great a hullabaloo over this," President Eisenhower advised after hearing news of a successful satellite launch. He was referring not to Sputnik I, which went into orbit on this date in 1957, but to the U.S. response, the Explorer I satellite, which began circling the planet in January 1958.
OPINION
October 4, 2007 | Kevin P. Chilton, Gen. Kevin P. Chilton, the commander of U.S. Strategic Command at Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska, was the commander of Air Force Space Command at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado from June 2006 until this week.
Fifty years ago today, the Soviet Union surprised the world by launching Sputnik, Earth's first artificial satellite, into orbit. The satellite's unfettered "flight" over our country and around the world brought home the Soviet threat for millions of Americans, and it motivated the United States to regain the technological upper hand through education, advanced science and civilian-military aerospace efforts.
OPINION
January 30, 2008 | Michael D'Antonio, Michael D'Antonio is the author, most recently, of "A Ball, a Dog, and a Monkey: 1957 -- The Space Race Begins."
Fifty years ago tomorrow, the United States launched its first satellite, Explorer 1, into orbit. Its success may seem to be a footnote in space history, a second-place finish to the Soviet Union's Sputnik. After all, wasn't it Sputnik, launched four months earlier, that represented the real scientific breakthrough and sent Americans cowering in fear at the shiny Russian ball orbiting overhead? Not exactly.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2007
To those pseudo-conservatives who complain that Google's logo recognized the anniversary of the Soviets' Sputnik launch, ("Logo tweak sends critics into orbit," Oct. 9), I would like to point out that NASA also recognizes the anniversaries of Sputnik and the first man in space, Russian Yuri Gagarin. In fact, NASA's chief administrator, Michael Griffin, traveled to Moscow to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the launch.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By Haruki Murakami , Translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel, Alfred A. Knopf,210 pages, $23 A Haruki Murakami novel is like the David Hockney painting of a swimming pool into which someone has just dived, fallen or been pushed. The colors are warm, the details realistic. The scene has an inviting transparency--no other contemporary Japanese novelist other than Murakami seems easier for the Western reader to enjoy. Yet there's a mystery at the center of it.
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