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WORLD
December 7, 2012 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - The director of Afghanistan's spy agency was improving Friday after treatment for wounds he suffered when a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device a day earlier at a Directorate of National Security guest house in the capital, officials said. "By God the great, the health condition of Asadullah Khalid . . . is acceptable and is getting better," the Directorate of National Security said in a statement. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the bombing, which occurred as Khalid, 43, was greeting a visitor to the guest house in an upscale neighborhood of Kabul.
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NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
Hillary Rodham Clinton's comment last week that women face a double standard in politics raised eyebrows. And then came former CIA and NSA director Michael Hayden to prove her point. It happened in reference to Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, who has been embroiled in a battle with the CIA over a Senate report that detailed the spy agency's actions in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks. “If the Senate can declassify this report, we will be able to ensure that an un-American, brutal program of detention and interrogation will never again be considered or permitted,” Feinstein, who as head of the Senate Intelligence Committee has certainly been privy to the report's findings, said last month.
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BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A British intelligence agency reportedly intercepted and stored millions of images from Yahoo users' video chats. Under a program code-named Optic Nerve, the Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ, would collect still images in bulk from users when they chatted with others via webcam through Yahoo, the Guardian reported on Thursday. The report cited documents provided by U.S. surveillance program leaker Edward Snowden. During a six-month period in 2008, the GCHQ collected images from more than 1.8 million Yahoo users through the Optic Nerve program, the report said.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A British intelligence agency reportedly intercepted and stored millions of images from Yahoo users' video chats. Under a program code-named Optic Nerve, the Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ, would collect still images in bulk from users when they chatted with others via webcam through Yahoo, the Guardian reported on Thursday. The report cited documents provided by U.S. surveillance program leaker Edward Snowden. During a six-month period in 2008, the GCHQ collected images from more than 1.8 million Yahoo users through the Optic Nerve program, the report said.
WORLD
December 3, 2013 | By Jung-Yoon Choi and Barbara Demick, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
SEOUL, South Korea -- North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's uncle, the Pyongyang regime's de facto No. 2 official, has probably been ousted from his posts, South Korea's state spy agency said Tuesday. In a report released at a meeting with lawmakers, the National Intelligence Service said that two close confidants of 67-year-old Jang Song Taek appear to have been publicly executed in late November for “anti-party activities. " The intelligence agency concluded that the executions of Ri Yong-Ha and Jang Soo - Kil couldn't have taken place unless Jang, holding the position of vice chairman of the National Defense Commission, had lost his job. Jang is the husband of the late leader Kim Jong Il's only full sibling, Kim Kyung Hui, and held a position in the secretive family hierarchy tantamount to regent after Kim Jong Il died in December 2011, leaving the not-yet-30-year-old Kim Jong Un in charge.
WORLD
July 15, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
A senior Indian official has accused Pakistan's powerful spy agency of planning and carrying out the 2008 terrorist attack in Mumbai, the toughest and most direct allegation by the Indian government against its neighbor over the assault that killed 166 people. The allegation of Inter-Services Intelligence agency involvement, published Wednesday in the Indian Express newspaper, comes a day before the foreign ministers of the nuclear-armed rivals are scheduled to meet in Islamabad in a bid to ease suspicion stemming from the attack.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori's government sent Congress urgent legislation to disband his disgraced spy agency, shortly after opening talks with the opposition on holding new elections. The dismantling of the National Intelligence Service was a key demand of the opposition, which also warned that the talks with Fujimori would be damaged unless he arrests the agency's powerful former chief, Vladimiro Montesinos, implicated recently in a bribery scandal.
WORLD
October 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The police officer leading the investigation of train bombings in July that killed more than 200 people in Mumbai accused Pakistan's spy agency of masterminding the attack. Tariq Azim Khan, Pakistan's minister of state for information, denied the claim, calling it "sad and unfortunate." Mumbai police Commissioner A.N. Roy said an intensive investigation that included using truth serum in the interrogation of suspects revealed that Pakistan's top spy agency was behind the bombings.
WORLD
May 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The author of a disputed British intelligence dossier on Iraqi weapons of mass destruction that laid out the case for war was chosen to head Britain's MI6 spy agency. Opposition politicians said John Scarlett should not have been appointed while a government inquiry is probing why Iraq did not have the chemical, biological and nuclear weapons programs cited as a cause for war. British Prime Minister Tony Blair defended the appointment, saying Scarlett was chosen on merit.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The highly secretive National Security Agency is looking to hire 7,500 workers over the next five years in the spy agency's largest recruiting campaign since the 1980s. A release posted on the agency's website said the NSA plans to hire 1,500 workers by September, and another 1,500 in each of the next four years. Those with specialties in foreign languages, especially Arabic and Chinese, were encouraged to apply. The agency, part of the Defense Department based at Ft. Meade, Md.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Dianne Feinstein got out of her chair, grabbed a 54-page federal court opinion and poked her finger at the bullet points buried inside, insisting a visitor read each carefully as the busy senator watched and waited. The opinion described terrorist bombing plots - aimed at New York's subways and stock exchange and at a newspaper office in Denmark - that, according to the judge, had been foiled by the government's collection of data on billions of American phone calls.
NEWS
January 9, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Even if it ends up derailing Chris Christie's presidential ambitions, the scandal involving a contrived traffic jam in New Jersey is less of a story than the electronic surveillance programs revealed by Edward Snowden. But “Bridgegate” has something that the more consequential National Security Agency revelations so far lack - the use of government power to punish political enemies. At his marathon news conference Thursday, Christie said he was “embarrassed and humiliated” by evidence that “people on my team” had orchestrated the closing of lanes from Fort Lee, N.J., to the George Washington Bridge.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - Congress is giving only halfhearted support to a Pentagon effort to broaden military espionage operations beyond war zones. The Pentagon created the Defense Clandestine Service in April 2012 to recruit sources and steal secrets around the globe, just as the CIA does. The new service relies on several hundred operatives from the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Pentagon's main source of human intelligence and analysis. But senior defense officials failed to convince key members of Congress, especially those on committees that oversee Pentagon and intelligence operations, that the CIA's National Clandestine Service and the 15 other U.S. intelligence agencies aren't meeting military needs.
WORLD
December 3, 2013 | By Jung-Yoon Choi and Barbara Demick, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
SEOUL, South Korea -- North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's uncle, the Pyongyang regime's de facto No. 2 official, has probably been ousted from his posts, South Korea's state spy agency said Tuesday. In a report released at a meeting with lawmakers, the National Intelligence Service said that two close confidants of 67-year-old Jang Song Taek appear to have been publicly executed in late November for “anti-party activities. " The intelligence agency concluded that the executions of Ri Yong-Ha and Jang Soo - Kil couldn't have taken place unless Jang, holding the position of vice chairman of the National Defense Commission, had lost his job. Jang is the husband of the late leader Kim Jong Il's only full sibling, Kim Kyung Hui, and held a position in the secretive family hierarchy tantamount to regent after Kim Jong Il died in December 2011, leaving the not-yet-30-year-old Kim Jong Un in charge.
WORLD
December 3, 2013 | By Laura King
CAIRO -- His verses spoke of the sufferings of ordinary people. And they struck a powerful chord. Egyptian poet Ahmed Fouad Negm, beloved as a colloquial but eloquent voice of the nation for more than four decades, died Tuesday at age 84, his publisher said. Negm's working-class life, richly rendered in the colorful Arabic of the street, traced the country's upheavals and hardships throughout the reign of authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak, who was driven from power in 2011.
OPINION
November 24, 2013 | Doyle McManus
Remember Edward Snowden? For a while, the National Security Agency's renegade contractor seemed like the most influential man in American intelligence, even though he's been hiding out in Moscow. Snowden's disclosures touched off a wave of enthusiasm in Congress for reforming the NSA's surveillance practices - and anger overseas when he revealed that American spies were listening to foreign leaders' cellphone calls. But now, as Congress counts only a few working days remaining in its year, the momentum toward intelligence reform has slowed.
NEWS
March 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Prosecutors arrested three high-ranking officials of South Korea's spy agency, charging that they paid a Korean American businessman to hold news conferences in Beijing, Tokyo and Seoul in December in which it was alleged that President Kim Dae Jung's presidential campaign was funded by the leader of Communist North Korea. The businessman was arrested on a libel charge in February.
NEWS
March 8, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
A lawyer who represented Lebanese terrorist Georges Ibrahim Abdallah until last year has admitted that he also worked for the French counterintelligence agency and informed on his client. The Council of the Order of Lawyers has opened a disciplinary hearing into the conduct of lawyer Jean-Paul Mazurier.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency acknowledged that it repeatedly violated its own privacy guidelines in a now-defunct program to collect "to and from" data in American email, according to newly released documents that paint a picture of incompetence but offer no evidence that the agency intentionally misused its surveillance powers. A judge on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, John D. Bates, said in an opinion whose date was redacted that there had been "systemic over collection" in the email program and that "those responsible for conducting oversight at the NSA had failed to do so effectively.
OPINION
November 1, 2013 | By Amy Zegart and Marshall Erwin
In the wake of Edward Snowden's ongoing revelations about U.S. surveillance programs, the National Security Agency is facing the worst crisis in its 60-year history. Today, too many Americans mistakenly believe the NSA is listening to their phone calls and reading their emails. But misperception is only part of the agency's problem. In an Oct. 5-7 YouGov national poll we commissioned, we also found the more that Americans understand the NSA's activities, the less they support the agency.
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