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Spy Factory Store

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BUSINESS
February 13, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You are a high-powered oil company executive fretting over Saddam Hussein's terrorist threats, thinking you would feel a tad more secure with a bulletproof car and some accessories like a bomb scanner, tear-gas deterrent and gun ports. Or perhaps you are a walking zombie because of your neighbor's noisy late-night soirees, thinking you would give anything for an industrial-sized smoke grenade you could use to quickly disperse the crowd.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal authorities shut down Spy Factory, the nation's largest chain of "spy shops," after the company and its owner pleaded guilty to smuggling and selling illegal bugging and wiretapping devices. The San Antonio-based chain was closed shortly after a plea hearing in a Manhattan federal court at which U.S. District Judge Sonia Sotomayor ordered Spy Factory and all of its assets forfeited. The U.S.
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BUSINESS
August 22, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Spy Store Owner Indicted: Ronald Kimball, owner of the Spy Factory Inc., has been arrested on charges of smuggling illegal bugging and wiretapping devices, and selling them in his stores. He was named along with two other executives of the San Antonio-based chain in a federal indictment unsealed in New York City. Kimball was arrested in San Antonio.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Spy Store Owner Indicted: Ronald Kimball, owner of the Spy Factory Inc., has been arrested on charges of smuggling illegal bugging and wiretapping devices, and selling them in his stores. He was named along with two other executives of the San Antonio-based chain in a federal indictment unsealed in New York City. Kimball was arrested in San Antonio.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal authorities shut down Spy Factory, the nation's largest chain of "spy shops," after the company and its owner pleaded guilty to smuggling and selling illegal bugging and wiretapping devices. The San Antonio-based chain was closed shortly after a plea hearing in a Manhattan federal court at which U.S. District Judge Sonia Sotomayor ordered Spy Factory and all of its assets forfeited. The U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1992 | KEVIN BRASS
During certain evenings last month, more than half of the TV sets turned on in San Diego were tuned to KNSD-TV (Channel 39), according to the Arbitron ratings report for July released last week. No, the attraction wasn't a news report exploring the potential life-threatening dangers of breakfast cereals. Nor a Paul Bloom "Crime Watch" segment exposing the vile underbelly of San Diego society. The lure was, of course, the Olympics.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1992 | Susan Christian, Times Staff Writer
A LITTLE LIGHT READING When federal investigators raided Steven D. Wymer's Newport Beach house, they found on his bedside table a book entitled "How to Launder Money." The financial manager was indicted Thursday on counts of securities and mail fraud after at least $100 million disappeared from accounts he controlled for more than a dozen cities in California and Iowa. But no, the investigators have it all wrong, say Wymer's attorneys. The book was his wife's--he never touched the thing.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You are a high-powered oil company executive fretting over Saddam Hussein's terrorist threats, thinking you would feel a tad more secure with a bulletproof car and some accessories like a bomb scanner, tear-gas deterrent and gun ports. Or perhaps you are a walking zombie because of your neighbor's noisy late-night soirees, thinking you would give anything for an industrial-sized smoke grenade you could use to quickly disperse the crowd.
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