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Spy Kids Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Movie attendance, which had been going south over the last couple of weeks, got a boost over the weekend with the arrival of the new family adventure "Spy Kids," starring Antonio Banderas, from "El Mariachi" director Robert Rodriguez. The $27-million debut in 3,104 theaters not only attracted kids to Saturday and Sunday matinees, but also drew full-paying customers in the evenings.
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NEWS
April 6, 2001 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While one brother entertained Hollywood's A-list at a pre-Oscar bash in Beverly Hills for his art-house movie "Chocolat," the younger sibling was holed up in a lower Manhattan office poring over marketing details for the release of his family adventure film "Spy Kids." Bob Weinstein, the one who skipped the party, was making sure that the $36-million James-Bond-for-kids action feature would become another lucrative franchise for his 7-year-old Dimension Films.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 2001 | Associated Press
Hundreds of people invited to the Walt Disney Co.'s California Adventure theme-park theater for a movie premiere were turned away because too many showed up for the screening. Disney officials said they were simply overwhelmed by response to the premiere of the movie "Spy Kids" in the Anaheim park's 1,400-seat Hyperion Theater. The movie opens nationwide March 30.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Movie attendance, which had been going south over the last couple of weeks, got a boost over the weekend with the arrival of the new family adventure "Spy Kids," starring Antonio Banderas, from "El Mariachi" director Robert Rodriguez. The $27-million debut in 3,104 theaters not only attracted kids to Saturday and Sunday matinees, but also drew full-paying customers in the evenings.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While one brother entertained Hollywood's A-list at a pre-Oscar bash in Beverly Hills for his art-house movie "Chocolat," the younger sibling was holed up in a lower Manhattan office poring over marketing details for the release of his family adventure film "Spy Kids." Bob Weinstein, the one who skipped the party, was making sure that the $36-million James-Bond-for-kids action feature would become another lucrative franchise for his 7-year-old Dimension Films.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Jackie Chan vehicles are of interest--how could they not be, with him as the star?--but they're not all created equal, and it's fair to say "The Tuxedo" will not be at the top of anyone's list. It's simply Hollywood's latest attempt to fit Asia's iconoclastic action hero into familiar genre patterns.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2004 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Long-feuding family members Walt Disney Co. and Miramax Films finally look to be on the same page -- at least conceptually. Disney presented in a meeting this week a framework for negotiating a possible deal that was first floated by Miramax co-founder Harvey Weinstein to launch his own independently financed movie operation. Under this plan, Weinstein's younger brother, Bob, would continue to run Miramax's successful Dimension Films unit for parent Disney.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2005 | Claudia Eller and Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writers
A few months back, a top Walt Disney Co. executive asked Fox Searchlight chief Peter Rice a question that once would have seemed inconceivable. The executive wanted to know how Rice was having so much success with his red-hot independent film label, which produced this year's Oscar-nominated "Sideways." The answer: by taking creative risks, not financial ones. In other words, by operating the way Disney's own pioneering specialty label Miramax Films used to.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2003 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
At first, Larry and Andy Wachowski were merely flattered. Then the "Matrix" filmmakers grew annoyed -- the dazzling visuals from their 1999 blockbuster were being ripped off by everything from "Shrek" to a TV car commercial. So the brothers decided the next time around there would be one thing other directors couldn't filch: a stratospheric budget. The Wachowskis went out and spent a staggering $100 million on computer effects for their two upcoming "Matrix" movies.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Microsoft Corp. and Nintendo Co. this week launch high-tech video game consoles, few regions have as much riding on their success as Southern California, which has quietly become pivotal to the $20-billion global video game industry. More game companies call Southern California home than anywhere outside Silicon Valley. The shift represents the development of games from geeky pastime to mass entertainment driven less by technology and more by drama, characters, music and fantastic visuals.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2001 | Associated Press
Hundreds of people invited to the Walt Disney Co.'s California Adventure theme-park theater for a movie premiere were turned away because too many showed up for the screening. Disney officials said they were simply overwhelmed by response to the premiere of the movie "Spy Kids" in the Anaheim park's 1,400-seat Hyperion Theater. The movie opens nationwide March 30.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2004 | Claudia Eller and Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writers
No Hollywood figure is generating more intrigue these days than Harvey Weinstein, who has turned his musings about his future into daily grist for industry gossips and news hounds. In a public spat, the Miramax Films co-founder recently became so fed up with parent Walt Disney Co. that he said he was ready to break free from a partnership that produced such Oscar-winning hits as "Chicago" and "Shakespeare in Love."
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