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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For a nation bewitched by period dramas in which men wear hats and sip whiskey while making eyes at crimson-lipped women who smoke an endless succession of unfiltered cigarettes, the Sundance Channel miniseries "Restless" offers all that and more. Adapted by William Boyd from his novel of the same name, the miniseries, which premieres Friday, centers on a secret British intelligence agency attempting to draw the reluctant United States into World War II. Which means in addition to the fabulous clothes, there's a fabulous British cast, not to mention the endlessly fascinating world of espionage and a bit of revelatory World War II history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By John Horn
LAS VEGAS - From the 34th floor of the Aria Resort & Casino, a colossal hotel complex with more than 4,000 rooms and a 150,000-square-foot gambling floor, Robert De Niro surveyed what remained of the Las Vegas he once knew. "I don't even recognize the place," the 70-year-old actor said, peering out the vertiginous, floor-to-ceiling windows in his suite. "I can't even imagine how much this city has changed. When you fly in here, it just goes on and on. " Asked to point out some of the locations where he and Martin Scorsese made "Casino" nearly two decades ago - specifically, the Riviera Hotel & Casino - De Niro was stumped and shook his head.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2006
I agree with Kenneth Turan's review of "The Good Shepherd" ["A Spy Whose Soul Goes Undercover," Dec. 22]. I've often felt Robert De Niro was an underrated director. Just watch his feature directorial debut, "A Bronx Tale" (1993). It is much different than the more stylized "The Good Shepherd." With recent spy movies such as "Casino Royale" dazzling audiences with action, it's refreshing to see a film that takes a more understated approach to the world of espionage, and even more refreshing to find a filmmaker who isn't afraid to allow his actors to take their time and have moments, an element often missing in today's blockbusters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By John Horn
As the Oscar-winning filmmaker behind "Argo," Ben Affleck certainly knows the difference between a good spy story and a bad one. Part of his education came from novelist Tom Clancy, who died Tuesday in a Baltimore hospital. The bestselling author of espionage tales was 66. As a young actor, Affleck was cast in the 2002 film adaptation of "The Sum of All Fears," in which Affleck played Clancy's famous CIA operative Jack Ryan.  PHOTOS: Tom Clancy: 1947-2013 “I think Tom was really the first major writer in the genre to make realism the top priority," Affleck said Tuesday.
BOOKS
August 2, 1987 | Dick Lochte
In their study of the evolution of the espionage novel, John G. Cawelti, professor of English at the University of Kentucky, and Bruce A. Rosenberg, professor of American Civilization and English at Brown, spend most of their time focusing on the works of five authors.
BOOKS
October 18, 1987 | David Lamb, Lamb is a national correspondent for the Times based in Los Angeles.
If a reader is looking for flaws, he will have difficulty finding any in David Ignatius' first novel, "Agents of Innocence," a fast-paced spy story set in Beirut. The book is a first-rate achievement in the best tradition of Graham Greene--historically accurate and fictionally engrossing. Like Ignatius, a former Wall Street Journal reporter and now an editor at the Washington Post, I spent a lot of time in Beirut in 1982 and 1983. Our paths crossed often.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By John Horn
As the Oscar-winning filmmaker behind "Argo," Ben Affleck certainly knows the difference between a good spy story and a bad one. Part of his education came from novelist Tom Clancy, who died Tuesday in a Baltimore hospital. The bestselling author of espionage tales was 66. As a young actor, Affleck was cast in the 2002 film adaptation of "The Sum of All Fears," in which Affleck played Clancy's famous CIA operative Jack Ryan.  PHOTOS: Tom Clancy: 1947-2013 “I think Tom was really the first major writer in the genre to make realism the top priority," Affleck said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Roger Hall, who wrote "You're Stepping on My Cloak and Dagger," a wry memoir about World War II spycraft that became a cult classic in intelligence circles and appealed to a wide audience for its irreverence, died July 20 of congestive heart failure at his home in Wilmington, Del. He was 89. Hall's 1957 bestseller was based on his time in the Office of Strategic Services, the wartime precursor to the CIA.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For a nation bewitched by period dramas in which men wear hats and sip whiskey while making eyes at crimson-lipped women who smoke an endless succession of unfiltered cigarettes, the Sundance Channel miniseries "Restless" offers all that and more. Adapted by William Boyd from his novel of the same name, the miniseries, which premieres Friday, centers on a secret British intelligence agency attempting to draw the reluctant United States into World War II. Which means in addition to the fabulous clothes, there's a fabulous British cast, not to mention the endlessly fascinating world of espionage and a bit of revelatory World War II history.
NATIONAL
June 30, 2010 | By Robin Abcarian and Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Talk about your American Dream. One day you're a 28-year-old red-haired beauty from Russia trying to make it as a "businesswoman" in New York City. The next, your name and sexy Facebook profile photo are splashed all over the world, your every status update — "Pain is only weakness leaving the body," for instance — the subject of international fascination. You are a femme fatale. And all you did was allegedly participate in a Russian spy ring. Every good Cold-War-style spy scandal needs a Natasha, and Anna Chapman, who appeared in court Monday in designer jeans and a white T-shirt, has emerged as the tale's sexy antagonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
For its third original dramatic series, AMC has chosen to reimagine -- as a six-episode miniseries that will run in a clump from Sunday to Tuesday -- Patrick McGoohan's 1967 British spy-fi show "The Prisoner." (It first aired here in 1968.) If the network, here co-producing with the U.K.'s Granada and ITV, was out to prove itself unafraid to mount another show as slow as "Mad Men," it has succeeded, with the difference that "Mad Men" is never boring. In the original, a cult classic so revered that remaking it would seem the very definition of imprudent, McGoohan played a secret agent who resigned his job and awoke in a fanciful metaphor for the English class system called the Village, where the originalhe has been given a number, Six, for a name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Roger Hall, who wrote "You're Stepping on My Cloak and Dagger," a wry memoir about World War II spycraft that became a cult classic in intelligence circles and appealed to a wide audience for its irreverence, died July 20 of congestive heart failure at his home in Wilmington, Del. He was 89. Hall's 1957 bestseller was based on his time in the Office of Strategic Services, the wartime precursor to the CIA.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2006
I agree with Kenneth Turan's review of "The Good Shepherd" ["A Spy Whose Soul Goes Undercover," Dec. 22]. I've often felt Robert De Niro was an underrated director. Just watch his feature directorial debut, "A Bronx Tale" (1993). It is much different than the more stylized "The Good Shepherd." With recent spy movies such as "Casino Royale" dazzling audiences with action, it's refreshing to see a film that takes a more understated approach to the world of espionage, and even more refreshing to find a filmmaker who isn't afraid to allow his actors to take their time and have moments, an element often missing in today's blockbusters.
NEWS
January 18, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Forgive-and-Forget Week in America. Last week, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted unanimously to give an honorary Oscar to Elia Kazan, who, nearly 50 years ago, in a single appearance before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, destroyed the careers of several fellow artists, including actor Morris Carnovsky and playwright Clifford Odets. While Hollywood might want to stuff the evil genies of the Cold War and Sen.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
For its third original dramatic series, AMC has chosen to reimagine -- as a six-episode miniseries that will run in a clump from Sunday to Tuesday -- Patrick McGoohan's 1967 British spy-fi show "The Prisoner." (It first aired here in 1968.) If the network, here co-producing with the U.K.'s Granada and ITV, was out to prove itself unafraid to mount another show as slow as "Mad Men," it has succeeded, with the difference that "Mad Men" is never boring. In the original, a cult classic so revered that remaking it would seem the very definition of imprudent, McGoohan played a secret agent who resigned his job and awoke in a fanciful metaphor for the English class system called the Village, where the originalhe has been given a number, Six, for a name.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By John Horn
LAS VEGAS - From the 34th floor of the Aria Resort & Casino, a colossal hotel complex with more than 4,000 rooms and a 150,000-square-foot gambling floor, Robert De Niro surveyed what remained of the Las Vegas he once knew. "I don't even recognize the place," the 70-year-old actor said, peering out the vertiginous, floor-to-ceiling windows in his suite. "I can't even imagine how much this city has changed. When you fly in here, it just goes on and on. " Asked to point out some of the locations where he and Martin Scorsese made "Casino" nearly two decades ago - specifically, the Riviera Hotel & Casino - De Niro was stumped and shook his head.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now for the news: Five Pakistani nuclear scientists defect to the West, alleging that their military commanders have targeted Indian cities and strategic installations for preemptive nuclear strikes. "Nonsense," the Pakistani government declares, forcefully denying reports splashed across front pages in India and elsewhere this week.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | Associated Press
President Clinton has asked Congress to authorize more money for spy agencies, satellites and other intelligence activities in the next fiscal year, a published report said. The President's request is in the Defense Department budget that also includes cuts in military spending, the New York Times reported in today's editions. Sections of the defense budget dealing with intelligence activities are classified.
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