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Spying Controversy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1999
In a March 19 letter criticizing Al Gore for his flub in apparently claiming to have invented the Internet (though Gore did effectively support "the Information Highway"), Frank Alvidrez can't resist parroting the new anti-administration mantra, "Who lost the secrets to China?" Alvidrez writes, "While he (Gore) was 'courting' the Chinese and the Chinese were trying to collect our secrets. . . ." Whoa! Wait just a minute! Those secrets were stolen during the two previous administrations.
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WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
In recent days, disclosures of electronic surveillance by the U.S. National Security Agency, including allegations that it spied on foreign leaders, have threatened to cause significant damage to the United States' relations with some of its closest allies. Here are answers to some basic questions about the uproar. How did the NSA controversy start? On June 5 and 6, the Washington Post and Britain's Guardian published highly classified documents revealing two genuinely surprising secrets.
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WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
In recent days, disclosures of electronic surveillance by the U.S. National Security Agency, including allegations that it spied on foreign leaders, have threatened to cause significant damage to the United States' relations with some of its closest allies. Here are answers to some basic questions about the uproar. How did the NSA controversy start? On June 5 and 6, the Washington Post and Britain's Guardian published highly classified documents revealing two genuinely surprising secrets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1999
In a March 19 letter criticizing Al Gore for his flub in apparently claiming to have invented the Internet (though Gore did effectively support "the Information Highway"), Frank Alvidrez can't resist parroting the new anti-administration mantra, "Who lost the secrets to China?" Alvidrez writes, "While he (Gore) was 'courting' the Chinese and the Chinese were trying to collect our secrets. . . ." Whoa! Wait just a minute! Those secrets were stolen during the two previous administrations.
SPORTS
November 14, 1987 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Dick Enright resigned Friday as Capistrano Valley High School football coach in the wake of severe sanctions imposed on him by the Saddleback Unified School District for a breach of coaching ethics. Enright, 53, was the central figure in spying charges brought by El Toro High School officials two weeks ago. In what he described as "an error in judgment," Enright viewed videotape of an El Toro practice a few days before Capistrano Valley's game against El Toro.
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | RICH CONNELL and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Just as Rodney G. King's beating reopened complaints of police racism and brutality in Los Angeles, suspicions that the Police Department secretly gathers damaging intelligence on public officials have been rekindled in the ensuing political firestorm. In the months after the March 3 videotaped assault on King, critics of Police Chief Daryl F.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tom Gerard, the former police officer arrested upon his return from the Philippines in a spying controversy here, was charged with four counts of stealing government documents and one count of conspiracy. Gerard, 50, is to be arraigned Wednesday. He is accused of leaking confidential police intelligence files to Roy Bullock, a longtime investigator for the Anti-Defamation League. The two men also are suspected of selling information to the government of South Africa.
OPINION
September 2, 2011
The United States has long considered Colombia its strongest ally in Latin America. Over the last eight years it has provided the Colombian government with nearly $6 billion as part of Plan Colombia, an ambitious anti-narcotics and counterinsurgency program that has often been held up as a model of cooperation. But recent reports in the Washington Post suggest that U.S. assistance intended to combat drugs and terrorism was diverted to Colombian intelligence officials, who used it instead to spy on judges, journalists, politicians and union leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1985
The Los Angeles City Council makes decisions on behalf of a cosmopolitan city of 3 million that sprawls over 465 square miles. Fifteen council members represent districts as populous as 230,000 in the mid-Wilshire area and as large as 66 square miles in the San Fernando Valley. Eight members of the City Council are up for reelection in the April 9 primary.
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his first extensive public comments on the scandal rocking his agency, CIA Director R. James Woolsey acknowledged Thursday that discovery of what officials say is a Kremlin "mole" in the agency represents a "very serious" internal security breach and said a special commission is examining possible changes. Woolsey, facing sometimes sharp questions from the House Intelligence Committee, said he shares lawmakers' concerns that the spying controversy surrounding veteran CIA officer Aldrich H.
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | RICH CONNELL and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Just as Rodney G. King's beating reopened complaints of police racism and brutality in Los Angeles, suspicions that the Police Department secretly gathers damaging intelligence on public officials have been rekindled in the ensuing political firestorm. In the months after the March 3 videotaped assault on King, critics of Police Chief Daryl F.
SPORTS
November 14, 1987 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Dick Enright resigned Friday as Capistrano Valley High School football coach in the wake of severe sanctions imposed on him by the Saddleback Unified School District for a breach of coaching ethics. Enright, 53, was the central figure in spying charges brought by El Toro High School officials two weeks ago. In what he described as "an error in judgment," Enright viewed videotape of an El Toro practice a few days before Capistrano Valley's game against El Toro.
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his first extensive public comments on the scandal rocking his agency, CIA Director R. James Woolsey acknowledged Thursday that discovery of what officials say is a Kremlin "mole" in the agency represents a "very serious" internal security breach and said a special commission is examining possible changes. Woolsey, facing sometimes sharp questions from the House Intelligence Committee, said he shares lawmakers' concerns that the spying controversy surrounding veteran CIA officer Aldrich H.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2005 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department asked the Supreme Court on Wednesday to intervene in the case of alleged "dirty bomb" plotter Jose Padilla, contending that a lower court had no right to tell the Bush administration whether he should be tried in a criminal court or a military tribunal. U.S. Solicitor General Paul D.
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