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Spymaster

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Alan Eyerly
The incredibly stressful life of CIA case officer Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) grows even more complicated on “Still Positive,” Episode 306 of Showtime's “Homeland.” As a drawer full of pregnancy tests reveal, she's expecting a baby - and wishing it wasn't so. What the positive test results don't indicate, of course, is the father's identity. Is he Nicholas Brody (Damian Lewis), the world's most-wanted fugitive? Or is he a random guy Carrie slept with after going off her psych meds?
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Alan Eyerly
The incredibly stressful life of CIA case officer Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) grows even more complicated on “Still Positive,” Episode 306 of Showtime's “Homeland.” As a drawer full of pregnancy tests reveal, she's expecting a baby - and wishing it wasn't so. What the positive test results don't indicate, of course, is the father's identity. Is he Nicholas Brody (Damian Lewis), the world's most-wanted fugitive? Or is he a random guy Carrie slept with after going off her psych meds?
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WORLD
June 28, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A Russian military court sentenced a former spymaster to 25 years in prison Monday for betraying an espionage ring operating in the United States, a revelation last year that briefly strained relations between the two nations and turned one of the spies into a celebrity at home and abroad. Col. Alexander Poteyev was found guilty of high treason and desertion by the Moscow Military District Court, which also stripped him of his rank and awards and fined him the amount of his annual salary.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Lost in the Fourth of July hubbub -- but just in time for Bastille Day! -- came news that the French are spying just like the United States. Mon dieu! According to the French daily Le Monde, the country's Direction Generale de la Securite Exterieure (and sorry, but that just sounds tres more sophisticated than "National Security Agency") “systematically collects information about all electronic data sent by computers and telephones in France, as well as communications between France and abroad.” Think of it as the French version of the NSA's PRISM, which Edward Snowden blabbed about.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2011 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
Contemporary history is seldom as relevant and engaging as Douglas Waller's new biography, "Wild Bill Donovan: The Spymaster Who Created the OSS and Modern American Espionage," which is ? by turns ? fascinatingly instructive and thoroughly entertaining. Waller, a former Time correspondent and the author of an excellent biography of Gen. Billy Mitchell, has a great ally in his subject, who was a larger-than-life personality in an American Century favored with more than its share of outsized figures.
NEWS
June 29, 1993
Four weeks after opening amid a flurry of publicity, eyes focus once again Wednesday on the trial of the Cold War's most innovative spymaster, Markus Wolf, the man who developed and directed East Germany's network of 5,000 to 6,000 espionage agents. Scheduled to take the stand is Guenther Guillaume, who spy buffs remember was the East German agent that Wolf planted in the office of then-West German Chancellor Willy Brandt.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012 | By Paula L. Woods, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On two separate occasions over the last nine years, Olen Steinhauer has brought a thriller series to a close. The first was the end of a five-novel series set in an unnamed Eastern European bloc nation. Focusing on a People's Militia homicide unit and stretching over a 40-year period, the historical sweep and breadth of those novels catapulted Steinhauer's work from the mystery to spy genre in a spectacular and satisfying manner - and created high expectations for the series that followed.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the catacombs of Moscow's Dynamo Stadium, in a small office that is dimly lit and eerily quiet, former KGB officers still come to pay their respects to the Soviet Union's last spymaster. Leonid Shebarshin's business card now reads, "Russian National Economic Security Service," a private security firm through which he is trying to make his way in the new crime-anxious Russia.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yehuda Gil used to teach young agents of Israel's Mossad intelligence service about the craft of lying. Now, revelations that Gil, a former Mossad spymaster, fabricated information about Syria over a period of years have rocked the intelligence agency. And they have raised questions about the potential danger of the false information and its effect on the agency's future.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | From Reuters
Wartime spymaster Sir William Stephenson, the man Winston Churchill called "Intrepid," died at his Bermuda retirement home and was buried today in a secret ceremony, a local undertaker said. Stephenson, 93, was the subject of the book "A Man Called Intrepid," a history of his World War II espionage activities. He died on Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012 | By Paula L. Woods, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On two separate occasions over the last nine years, Olen Steinhauer has brought a thriller series to a close. The first was the end of a five-novel series set in an unnamed Eastern European bloc nation. Focusing on a People's Militia homicide unit and stretching over a 40-year period, the historical sweep and breadth of those novels catapulted Steinhauer's work from the mystery to spy genre in a spectacular and satisfying manner - and created high expectations for the series that followed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | By Robert Abele
The densely packed, questioning documentary "The Man Nobody Knew: In Search of My Father, CIA Spymaster William Colby" is a remarkable feat of personalized biography. Like a case officer parsing more than just facts, filmmaker Carl Colby delves into the story of his late dad's intelligence career — World War II O.S.S. operative, stealth campaigner against Italian Communists, controversial Vietnam War strategist and finally secret-spilling CIA director during legendary 1970s congressional hearings — with a respectful yet keen eye toward the moral pitfalls of patriotic duplicity.
WORLD
June 28, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A Russian military court sentenced a former spymaster to 25 years in prison Monday for betraying an espionage ring operating in the United States, a revelation last year that briefly strained relations between the two nations and turned one of the spies into a celebrity at home and abroad. Col. Alexander Poteyev was found guilty of high treason and desertion by the Moscow Military District Court, which also stripped him of his rank and awards and fined him the amount of his annual salary.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2011 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
Contemporary history is seldom as relevant and engaging as Douglas Waller's new biography, "Wild Bill Donovan: The Spymaster Who Created the OSS and Modern American Espionage," which is ? by turns ? fascinatingly instructive and thoroughly entertaining. Waller, a former Time correspondent and the author of an excellent biography of Gen. Billy Mitchell, has a great ally in his subject, who was a larger-than-life personality in an American Century favored with more than its share of outsized figures.
WORLD
July 1, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
In retrospect, it might not have been such a great idea for a district judge in this porous island-state to grant bail to an alleged Russian spymaster adept at slipping across borders, stashing huge amounts of cash and running sleeper agents in the United States. With enough cash and connections, locals say, there are hundreds of ways in and out of Cyprus. The man who went by the name of Robert Christopher Metsos may well have found one of them. Within hours of being arrested at the airport here Tuesday, appearing before Judge Christos Philippou and posting $34,000 cash bail, Metsos was gone — disappeared without a trace.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2009 | Tim Rutten
Stephen L. Carter is a formidable legal scholar with a gift for turning out sophisticated, multilayered works of popular fiction. "Jericho's Fall" -- an intricate spy thriller that proceeds at breakneck speed from mystery to revelation and back again -- marks a clear departure in his work, one that is likely to win him an even larger audience, and deservedly so.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | From Times wire services
East Germany's former spymaster is in the Soviet Union vacationing and writing a book, not seeking political asylum as a state-run television station reported, friends and officials said today. The TV report Wednesday night said Markus Wolf fled to the Soviet Union to evade imminent arrest on corruption charges.
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tapping a spymaster with close ties to the Arab world to lead Russia's foreign policy, President Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday appointed intelligence chief Yevgeny M. Primakov as his new foreign minister. Primakov, 66, has directed the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service for the past five years, and by some accounts has succeeded in boosting morale and limiting the number of defections.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2009 | Greg Miller
With the introduction of President-elect Barack Obama's intelligence team on Friday, the United States is poised to enter what might be considered the second phase in the counter-terrorism campaign launched after the Sept. 11 attacks.
WORLD
July 16, 2008 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
He appears briefly on TV, not saying much, if anything at all, and then fades into the secrecy and quiet diplomacy that men like him prefer. One day he's in Jerusalem, the next in Gaza, then back to Egypt to whisper in the ear of his boss, President Hosni Mubarak. Omar Suleiman, the head of Egypt's foreign intelligence service, has been at Mubarak's side through triumph and crisis, including a 1995 ambush on the president's motorcade that killed two security officers.
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