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Squash Game

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NEWS
January 13, 1990 | MARILYN OLIVER
Three days a week after a long day at work, Pam Regan, a sales manager for Donnelley Yellow Pages, drives from Huntington Beach to Gardena to play squash at the Squash Club of Los Angeles. There, she might see Bill Carlin, a real estate agent, who drives from Whittier to enjoy a sport he has played since prep school. "I've been playing the game for 40 years," Carlin says. "I love the game. It's a great way to stay in shape." "In squash, you use your body and mind together," Regan says.
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HEALTH
July 28, 2003 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
I played squash for the first time in England almost two decades ago. I was working in a London pub and needed an activity to sweat off the extra pints of lager. Such British pursuits as rugby, soccer and cricket were out of the question -- all are team sports in which I had little experience or interest. Instead, I wanted a game that delivered a vigorous workout, required little planning and offered refuge from the fickle English weather.
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SPORTS
February 13, 1998 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After graduating from Harvard in 1993, Marty Clark toured the world as a professional squash player for 3 1/2 years before returning to the United States to begin medical school. Competing at a world-class level proved easier than convincing some medical school administrators that studies and squash on a scaled-back level were compatible. "Some of the schools I interviewed at said, 'You must be joking! This is medical school,' " Clark said.
SPORTS
February 13, 1998 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After graduating from Harvard in 1993, Marty Clark toured the world as a professional squash player for 3 1/2 years before returning to the United States to begin medical school. Competing at a world-class level proved easier than convincing some medical school administrators that studies and squash on a scaled-back level were compatible. "Some of the schools I interviewed at said, 'You must be joking! This is medical school,' " Clark said.
HEALTH
July 28, 2003 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
I played squash for the first time in England almost two decades ago. I was working in a London pub and needed an activity to sweat off the extra pints of lager. Such British pursuits as rugby, soccer and cricket were out of the question -- all are team sports in which I had little experience or interest. Instead, I wanted a game that delivered a vigorous workout, required little planning and offered refuge from the fickle English weather.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | ERIK FAIR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You've heard of squash, the only sport on the planet named after a family of vegetables--the sport they play on a racquetball-like court with a badminton-like racquet. You may even know that squash hails from the hallowed halls of Ivy League schools such as Harvard and Yale. Beyond that, any way you slice it, getting a handle on squash is enough to drive you out of your gourd.
FOOD
October 31, 1991 | FAYE LEVY, Levy is a cookbook author
Pumpkins have been known to grow to 200 pounds. These giants, however, are best left for showing off at county fairs or carving jack-o'-lanterns. Relatively small ones, especially sugar pumpkins, are better suited to cooking. Many traditional recipes call for baking pumpkin and firm-skinned winter squash for an hour or two. But there's a faster way--you can cut off the peel and steam the vegetable in a steamer or in a little water in a saucepan.
FOOD
December 22, 1999 | MAYI BRADY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It isn't often that you can feel virtuous after indulging in a holiday meal. What you usually feel is stuffed, sleepy and guilty about all those extra calories and grams of fat and sugar you just consumed. If you've never celebrated Kwanzaa, now might be a good time. You can get the flavors of the holiday after investing only 30 minutes in the kitchen. And you won't spend even one minute feeling guilty about what you ate.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Old Globe Theatre's angry, throbbing production of David Mamet's "Oleanna" proves the play has earned the rage generated since it opened Off-Broadway last year. A female student accuses a male professor of sexual harassment. At first, over a series of three meetings, you think the student is crazy to interpret harassment in their admittedly tense exchanges. Then, as you hear her pain, you think maybe she has a point.
FOOD
October 31, 1991 | FAYE LEVY, Levy is a cookbook author
Pumpkins have been known to grow to 200 pounds. These giants, however, are best left for showing off at county fairs or carving jack-o'-lanterns. Relatively small ones, especially sugar pumpkins, are better suited to cooking. Many traditional recipes call for baking pumpkin and firm-skinned winter squash for an hour or two. But there's a faster way--you can cut off the peel and steam the vegetable in a steamer or in a little water in a saucepan.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | ERIK FAIR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You've heard of squash, the only sport on the planet named after a family of vegetables--the sport they play on a racquetball-like court with a badminton-like racquet. You may even know that squash hails from the hallowed halls of Ivy League schools such as Harvard and Yale. Beyond that, any way you slice it, getting a handle on squash is enough to drive you out of your gourd.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | MARILYN OLIVER
Three days a week after a long day at work, Pam Regan, a sales manager for Donnelley Yellow Pages, drives from Huntington Beach to Gardena to play squash at the Squash Club of Los Angeles. There, she might see Bill Carlin, a real estate agent, who drives from Whittier to enjoy a sport he has played since prep school. "I've been playing the game for 40 years," Carlin says. "I love the game. It's a great way to stay in shape." "In squash, you use your body and mind together," Regan says.
HEALTH
October 16, 2006 | Josh Fischman, Special to The Times
MINDING your health is not a young man's game. Muscles work smoothly in the teen years, joints flex easily in the 20s. It seems like men can eat what they want, drink what they desire, and the pounds melt away as quickly as they put them on. They can work 16-hour days, party until 3 a.m., and get up the next day and do it again. (Give or take a few bad hangovers, of course.) Life is a river, flowing to them effortlessly and endlessly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1985 | DANIEL AKST, Daniel Akst--who has no condo, futon or children--is a business writer for The Times
"There's no way to raise children on the quick. " --Sociologist Amitai Etzioni, on the problems of working parents. Mainly, I worried about my squash game. Oh, I know it sounds like a little thing, but I'd finally gotten my backhand up to where I want it, and I knew that having a baby just now would mean no more three-times-a-week at the club, and a heck of a decline in my fitness level. Mine and Cathy's both. As a matter of fact, squash is a pretty good metaphor for the way we live.
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