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NEWS
December 13, 1990 | Reuters
Two squatters were killed in a battle Tuesday with Brazilian police who evicted thousands from huts they had built on the outskirts of Sao Paulo, officials said Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Margaret Wappler
The Revolution of Every Day A Novel Cari Luna Tin House: 392 pp., $15.95 paper Much has been written recently about the impossibility of a middle-class existence in New York. Cari Luna sets her sights on an even more beleaguered socio-economic group with her excellent debut novel, "The Revolution of Every Day," which looks at squatter culture in the mid-'90s, when a tenement house in Manhattan's East Village could be seized by idealistic rebels. At Thirteen House, one of a clique of interconnected squats, a young runaway named Amelia is pregnant, but not by Gerrit, her Dutch boyfriend with a savior complex (he helped her kick heroin)
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NATIONAL
December 21, 2011 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Slips of paper are pasted to the broken door of the corner row house, violations for the garbage piled near the front steps. The stench of trash wafts up the dark interior stairway, where an ashtray filled with cigarette butts sits like an abandoned potted plant on the second-floor landing. Nobody lives here, at least not officially. But as you climb the narrow stairs to the top floor, a door opens into an airy apartment that is home to Tasha Glasgow, who is part of a largely invisible population of squatters occupying vacant homes across America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2012 | Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County's barren High Desert has long attracted those seeking seclusion in wide-open spaces, far beyond the reach of power lines, sewer pipes and pavement. For many of these self-described "desert rats," self-sufficiency is a matter of survival and pride: Solar panels and wind turbines provide power, enormous storage tanks provide water and a motley assortment of trailers, outbuildings and vehicles provides shelter from the withering sun. But this "live free" mind-set is coming under increasing attack as county investigators crack down on code violations and nuisance complaints in the far-flung north.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe promised to remove his party militants from white-owned farms they have occupied for six months. A one-day general strike protesting a breakdown in law and order shut down the economy while Mugabe met with South African President Thabo Mbeki in the capital, Harare. After the talks, Mugabe said the occupiers would be removed by the end of August from white farms not slated to be confiscated under a national land distribution plan.
WORLD
July 26, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Roel Robles had been on Pagasa Island for less than a week when he found himself wondering, with something like despair: Is it possible for one white-beached, palm-studded place to be both heaven and hell, paradise and prison? "When you first get there, you see this little island resort," said the 30-year-old sergeant in the Philippine National Police. "Then after about five days, something snaps. You begin telling yourself, 'I have to get out of here -- now, today.'
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Margaret Wappler
The Revolution of Every Day A Novel Cari Luna Tin House: 392 pp., $15.95 paper Much has been written recently about the impossibility of a middle-class existence in New York. Cari Luna sets her sights on an even more beleaguered socio-economic group with her excellent debut novel, "The Revolution of Every Day," which looks at squatter culture in the mid-'90s, when a tenement house in Manhattan's East Village could be seized by idealistic rebels. At Thirteen House, one of a clique of interconnected squats, a young runaway named Amelia is pregnant, but not by Gerrit, her Dutch boyfriend with a savior complex (he helped her kick heroin)
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | Reuters
Police used bulldozers to break down burning barricades and smashed through the roof of a stately home Monday to evict the last band of squatters occupying premises in central Amsterdam. No arrests were made and the 300 squatters, many wearing helmets and shouting revolutionary slogans, later staged a march through the city center.
NEWS
March 3, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Zimbabwe admitted that it had allowed former guerrillas to take over white farms but said it ordered the squatters to leave by Saturday after some became violent. The squatters, led by former combatants from Zimbabwe's bush war for independence, "could not be denied their democratic right to demonstrate" by storming onto at least 70 private properties in the past week, Home Affairs Minister Dumiso Dabengwa said.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
White farmers said black squatters invaded at least five more white-owned farms Friday, despite a court ruling against them and a government plea for an end to the occupations of hundreds of farms. Though Zimbabwe's High Court ruled Thursday that the government must remove the squatters, there was no apparent police action against the occupiers. However, much of the violence that has plagued the white-owned farms in recent days has dissipated, and squatters left several farms Friday.
NATIONAL
December 21, 2011 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Slips of paper are pasted to the broken door of the corner row house, violations for the garbage piled near the front steps. The stench of trash wafts up the dark interior stairway, where an ashtray filled with cigarette butts sits like an abandoned potted plant on the second-floor landing. Nobody lives here, at least not officially. But as you climb the narrow stairs to the top floor, a door opens into an airy apartment that is home to Tasha Glasgow, who is part of a largely invisible population of squatters occupying vacant homes across America.
WORLD
July 20, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Derek Mutigo's home is pitch black and as cold as a fridge. To reach it, he descends broken steps into a cavernous basement and edges along a corridor holding a small plastic flashlight, its pale beam revealing haphazard plasterboard walls that don't reach the ceiling. Numbers are scrawled in black ink on rickety doors. Nothing's painted; everything looks as though it was filched from a building site. "Warning, strictly no alcohol, smoking and fighting," says a scribbled sign on a wall.
WORLD
June 26, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
In South Korea, they're known as "errand men": hired street muscle who play often-violent mercenary roles in property disputes that law enforcement agencies refuse to handle. Their ranks are filled by physically fit young men who, critics allege, lurk in the gray area of the law, using violence and intimidation to assert the will of clients such as landlords, businessmen and even the government . A Seoul government ward office recently has resorted to using yongyeok , errand men, to chase away illegal street vendors from a popular tourist district.
WORLD
April 7, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
When Elbert Santiago, a poor messenger service employee and father of three, heard about a chance to trade up from his "hole" of a slum apartment to a place a short stroll from the presidential palace, he didn't think twice. After all, the price was the same for both places: practically nothing. Santiago is a squatter, one of the army of poor who with the encouragement of leftist President Hugo Chavez have taken over an estimated 155 office, apartment and government buildings here in the Venezuelan capital.
WORLD
February 14, 2010 | By Devorah Lauter
So your rent is getting you down and you decide to become a squatter. How to begin? "You will need some tools: a crowbar, a double-headed hammer and a large screwdriver to break open the door. A battering ram can also do the job," the Amsterdam squat assistance group Kraakspreekurin advises in one of the widely available guides to squatting in the Netherlands, which has elevated the practice of living rent-free (or just about free) to an art. OK, you're inside. Now what do you do?
WORLD
February 2, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg
David Saill is 10 years old, and he came to school Monday in a freshly ironed shirt and baggy black slacks to reclaim a piece of his lost life. He couldn't have it all back. Not his home, which collapsed in the Jan. 12 earthquake. Not his very best friend, Laguer, who died when his own house fell on him. Not the sense of security he felt before he knew that the earth could shake apart his known universe. But school -- that he could have back. Or so he was told. Monday was the first day that schools in Haiti could reopen after the earthquake, which was centered near the capital, Port-au-Prince.
WORLD
August 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Faced with eviction by 500 Brazilian riot police, thousands of squatters abandoned the shantytown they set up nearly three weeks ago on a vacant lot on the outskirts of Sao Paulo. Some set fire to the shacks they had built, but there were no reports of injuries and the fires were extinguished. In Brazil, about 90% of the land is owned by just 20% of the country's 170 million people.
NEWS
April 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
About 200 armed black squatters occupied another white-owned farm and police let them stay Sunday, warning them not to use violence. Squatters and ruling party supporters have seized about 1,000 white-owned farms in what they say is a protest against unequal land distribution; critics call the actions a bid by Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe to rally supporters and intimidate opponents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By David Zahniser and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
L.A. City Councilman Richard Alarcon, under investigation over questions about his residency, said today that he has not been living in a house in his district for nearly three months because of safety concerns prompted by a burglary at that address. Alarcon said that in late October a mentally ill man broke into his house, changed the locks on at least three doors and destroyed his possessions, including many of his clothes. "We haven't been there since then, that's for sure," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2009 | Tony Perry
Summer Dunsmore, 19, glanced over her shoulder at the 50 or so harbor seals snoozing on a small horseshoe-shaped beach beside the Children's Pool in La Jolla. "Look at them," said the La Jolla High graduate who is now a student at San Diego Mesa College. "They're such peaceful creatures."
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