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FOOD
January 31, 2007 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
THANKS to the popularity of fried calamari, almost everyone has eaten squid, even if very few people have cooked it. Really, there's not that much to it. The most important thing you have to know is that squid is almost pure muscle, with little fat. That means it cooks very quickly and overcooks almost as fast. If you've ever had calamari with the texture of rubber bands, it was because someone wasn't paying attention and let it cook a minute or two too long.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
At least two sea lions that died from gunshot wounds have washed ashore in Malibu this month, wildlife rescuers said. Illegal shootings of sea lions occur each year in October when squid fishing season begins, Jonsie Ross at the California Wildfire Center  told CBS Los Angeles . The Malibu Times reported that two of the ocean mammals found on the coast had died of bullet wounds and that a third bore suspicious injuries. CBS Los Angeles said at least three sea lions had been killed by gunshots.
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FOOD
May 20, 2010
Squid carbonara Total time: About 1 hour Servings: 2 Note: Adapted from Ludo Lefebvre. To cut lardons, cut the pancetta into one-half-inch-thick slices. Cut each slice crosswise into one-half-inch-thick strips and trim so each lardon is one inch in length. Lefebvre uses an immersion circulator to cook the eggs, but poached eggs are called for here. Parmesan sauce 2 cups plus 2 tablespoons chicken broth 1 cup heavy cream 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese In a medium pot over medium-high heat, reduce the chicken broth and heavy cream by three-fourths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
Four sea lions with evidence of gunshot wounds have been recovered from Malibu beaches in the last two months, wildlife rescuers said Thursday. The two such sea lions found this month had confirmed gunshot bodies, though it is unclear if they were shot before or after they died, said David Bard, director of the Marine Mammal Care Center in San Pedro, a hospital that treats the animals. Bullets were pulled from two of the four sea lions, and the other two had evidence of gunshot wounds, said Jonsie Ross, a marine mammal stranding coordinator at the California Wildlife Center.
FOOD
January 31, 2007
Total time: About 1 hour Servings: 4 Note: This recipe is adapted from Esca chef David Pasternack's upcoming "The Young Man and the Sea," which will be published in May. 6 cups olive oil 2 cups canola oil 3/4 cup Wondra flour 1/2 cup cornstarch 1/3 teaspoon sugar Pinch of cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon coarse salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 pound cleaned squid, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces...
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
For the first time ever, scientists have shot video of a live giant squid in its natural habitat -- and you can watch a snippet of it here. The video of the giant squid was shot 2,000 feet below the North Pacific Ocean , about 260 miles south of Tokyo. Scientists on the squid-finding mission had hoped to film at least a tentacle or two, but they got lucky: By the time the expedition was over, they had collected more than 23 minutes of the giant squid in the murky deep.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
A video making the rounds on the Internet shows a squid-topped dish. Soy sauce is poured on the squid and it begins flinging its tentacles. It even looks like it might be making a run for it at one point. It can be disturbing when your dinner moves around. Now Discovery Networks has an explainer (video above), telling why the squid -- which is indeed dead -- moves and whether the animal is feeling any pain. Both the video and the explainer are decidedly unappetizing, yet a little fascinating too.  Some of those who had seen the video, as the site notes, were disgusted by the apparent cruelty.
SCIENCE
February 13, 2010 | By Lori Kozlowski
Jumbo squids invaded Orange County late last month. The 10-limbed creatures, weighing up to 60 pounds, swarmed the waters near Newport Beach, and anglers delighted at the prospect of calamari steaks. Bruce Robison, senior scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, talked about the life of squids and why we shouldn't be afraid of these marine cephalopods. Why did this invasion happen in Orange County? There has been a large-scale invasion of the entire California coast that started in 2002.
FOOD
June 14, 2013
Total time: About 35 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: Squid are generally found at good fish markets and Asian markets, as well as Bristol Farms. This is also good with grilled shrimp. The shrimp will take a little longer to cook, but still only 3 or 4 minutes per side. 3 cups cooked white beans, about 2 (15-ounce) cans 1 cup diced celery 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/4 cup chopped parsley, plus a few celery leaves Olive oil Lemon juice Salt 1 pound cleaned squid 1/4 teaspoon pimenton de la vera (smoked paprika)
FOOD
May 26, 2011
  Spicy stir-fried squid (Ohjing-uh bokkeum) Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: This recipe can also be made with octopus. Then the dish would be called nakji bokkeum. Serve with rice (or over a bed of rice for informal meals), kimchi and other banchan. Our recipes, your kitchen: If you try this or any other recipe from the L.A. Times Test Kitchen, we would like to know about it so we can showcase it on our food blog and occasionally in print.
FOOD
June 14, 2013
Total time: About 35 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: Squid are generally found at good fish markets and Asian markets, as well as Bristol Farms. This is also good with grilled shrimp. The shrimp will take a little longer to cook, but still only 3 or 4 minutes per side. 3 cups cooked white beans, about 2 (15-ounce) cans 1 cup diced celery 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/4 cup chopped parsley, plus a few celery leaves Olive oil Lemon juice Salt 1 pound cleaned squid 1/4 teaspoon pimenton de la vera (smoked paprika)
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
A video making the rounds on the Internet shows a squid-topped dish. Soy sauce is poured on the squid and it begins flinging its tentacles. It even looks like it might be making a run for it at one point. It can be disturbing when your dinner moves around. Now Discovery Networks has an explainer (video above), telling why the squid -- which is indeed dead -- moves and whether the animal is feeling any pain. Both the video and the explainer are decidedly unappetizing, yet a little fascinating too.  Some of those who had seen the video, as the site notes, were disgusted by the apparent cruelty.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
There were a lot of startling statistics that came out of the seafood discussions at the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sustainable Foods Institute last week. Did you know that more than 90% of the fish we eat is imported? How about the fact that more than half of it is aquacultured? But the most startling to me was the fact that more than half of the fish consumed in the United States comes from just three groups - shrimp, tuna and salmon. You can look it up . But what are we going to do about that?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2013 | By Jill Cowan, Los Angeles Times
It was almost midnight when someone spotted the banana. Word on the boat spread quickly. Guys in the back corner were snacking on a bunch, people said, but it was unclear whether they had thrown the bad-luck fruit overboard. No matter - the damage had already been done. The Western Pride, a no-nonsense, 76-foot Ditmar Donaldson, was headed back to port without having hooked a single squid. The 75 or so anglers onboard had expected waters teeming with Humboldt squid, which are known for their mysterious sudden invasions of California coastal waters.
SCIENCE
January 12, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Some people use worms to attract fish. Others use intricately painted lures or feathery flies. To get the catch of a lifetime, marine biologist Edith Widder built a bioluminescent sphere that mimics the frenzied pinwheel display of a panicked jellyfish. Her soccer-ball-sized creation enticed a giant squid to swim near waiting undersea cameras. The resulting video, shot 2,000 feet below the North Pacific Ocean, about 260 miles south of Tokyo, was the first to capture the elusive creature in action and became an Internet sensation this week.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
For the first time ever, scientists have shot video of a live giant squid in its natural habitat -- and you can watch a snippet of it here. The video of the giant squid was shot 2,000 feet below the North Pacific Ocean , about 260 miles south of Tokyo. Scientists on the squid-finding mission had hoped to film at least a tentacle or two, but they got lucky: By the time the expedition was over, they had collected more than 23 minutes of the giant squid in the murky deep.
SCIENCE
January 12, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Some people use worms to attract fish. Others use intricately painted lures or feathery flies. To get the catch of a lifetime, marine biologist Edith Widder built a bioluminescent sphere that mimics the frenzied pinwheel display of a panicked jellyfish. Her soccer-ball-sized creation enticed a giant squid to swim near waiting undersea cameras. The resulting video, shot 2,000 feet below the North Pacific Ocean, about 260 miles south of Tokyo, was the first to capture the elusive creature in action and became an Internet sensation this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2001
Re "Fishermen, Scientists Squabble Over Squid," April 8. Commerce and biosphere are still in conflict. Nonnegotiable demands have reduced the likelihood of a rational discussion of allowable takes of squid. J'accuse! It's his fault, not mine! It's El Nino, not us! Our offshore picture is grim and familiar. Is it surprising that squidders can sell every squid they capture? It shouldn't be. The human demand for ocean fish is insatiable but the ability of fish stocks to sustain the demands of a free market is biologically limited.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
When a 600-pound giant squid discovered in the depths of the sea off the coast of Japan hits the news, the first thing that comes to mind is ... calamari? At least for some, including one participant in today's live chat, Lunchtime With Mr. Gold , who posed the question to Times restaurant critic Jonathan Gold: "Would you eat the giant squid, if you could?" To which Gold responded: "I have had something like giant squid -- flash-grilled arcturus tentacle at Esca in Manhattan . But I draw the line at endangered or threatened species.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
For centuries the giant squid has been the stuff of legend, but now, for the first time ever, scientists have collected footage of a giant squid, ( Architeuthis), in its natural habitat, thousands of feet below the ocean's surface.  "All of us were so amazed at what it looked like," Edie Widder, a marine biologist who was part of the successful video making mission, told the Los Angeles Times. "It looked carved out of metal. And it would change from being silver to gold. It was just breathtaking.
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