Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSquid
IN THE NEWS

Squid

NEWS
June 1, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quick, name the California seafood that hauls in the biggest bucks. The magnificent California king salmon? That perennial winner (and sushi delicacy) the sea urchin? The big white albacore? Pikers all. Try the squid, that slippery, bug-eyed mollusk with the cylindrical body, eight arms, two long tentacles and powerful suction cups.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A clash between two rival squid fishermen off Anacapa Island the other night ended in gunfire when they allegedly decided that a patch of the Pacific Ocean wasn't big enough for the both of them. In what could be called the Battle of Frenchy's Cove, 46-year-old John L. Birgel of Ventura, skipper of the Aspiration, and Frank S. Flores, 32, pilot of the Monterey-based Obsession, were allegedly vying for the same waters just before 8 p.m. Wednesday when things got out of hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
About 200 squid washed up on Leadbetter Beach and near Goleta Beach this week. More than a foot long with tentacles extending another two feet, the squid scattered on the sand early Wednesday before being attacked by birds or hauled off by beach visitors, said marine biologist David Ono of the state Department of Fish and Game.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | From Reuters
It may have arrived in New York in a box labeled "seafood," but this squid isn't your ordinary calamari. The American Museum of Natural History on Tuesday opened to the public its display of the world's best-preserved specimen of a giant squid, a mysterious, deep-sea creature whose habits never have been observed in the wild. The squid, netted by commercial fishermen off the coast of New Zealand in 1997, is a 25-foot-long male weighing 250 pounds.
FOOD
February 7, 2007
I enjoyed the article on squid ["Lights, Nets, Action," by Russ Parsons, Jan. 31]. Thought you might like to know that the arrival of the squid is also a big deal for local scuba divers. The ocean bottom in places like Veterans Park in Redondo Beach is covered with egg cases and dying squid, which attracts all sorts of animals looking for a free meal. AL LAUBENSTEIN Rancho Palos Verdes I enjoyed your article, but I object to a couple of things. First, you call squid an "almost infinite" resource but there are dozens of examples from recent history of species that seemed infinite at one time, yet the people making this claim clearly underestimated man's ability to hunt/fish/kill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1999 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A slumping Asian economy has sent squid prices falling to near-record lows, prompting some Ventura County squid fishers to back off from the harvest for now. Squid, which sold for as much as $800 a ton at its peak, is now selling between $200 and $300 a ton--if fishermen can find a buyer at all. Although prices have tumbled in the past, some fishermen here and around the state complain that current prices do not reflect demand for the product.
SPORTS
June 1, 2007 | Pete Thomas
The barracuda mystery was solved in a day. The popular game fish flooded into Santa Monica Bay last Friday, thrilling holiday weekend anglers. They all but vanished Monday. Tuesday, fishermen dropping lures intended for 10-pound barracuda instead latched onto 30- to 40-pound Humboldt squid. "I don't know if it's a coincidence or what," said Rick Oefinger, owner of Marina del Rey Sportfishing. "But we had a big jag of barracuda out there and on Monday there weren't any left."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California environmental officials, fed up with an Oxnard company they say is dumping waste water laden with scummy squid parts into Port Hueneme Harbor, announced Thursday they have levied a $19,900 fine against Sun Coast Calamari. The fine is believed to be the first ever imposed on a fishing company for a water pollution infraction in California.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an anguished metallic cry, a winch slowly pulls a shimmering black net teeming with squid aboard the Heavy Duty. Giant light bulbs visible for miles illuminate the evening's catch: 25 tons of silvery squid that in a matter of hours will be chopped into calamari bound for overseas markets. "The boat's leaning now!" yells a crew member, as the metal winch strains to hoist the heavy load alongside the 58-foot vessel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2012 | Tony Barboza
As the sun sets over the ocean, the six crewmen on the Cape Blanco are starting a long night's work off the far side of Santa Catalina Island, putting on orange slickers and hard hats to fish for the milky white mollusks that have become California's most valuable catch. Below the gentle waves off the side of the boat swims an immense school of market squid. Capt. Nick Jurlin, pacing impatiently with a cigarette dangling from his mouth, is eager to pull in as much of it as possible.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|