Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSr 71 Airplane
IN THE NEWS

Sr 71 Airplane

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The SR-71 Blackbird spy plane roared into history Tuesday with a record-setting cross-country flight and a roof-rattling sonic boom heard across Southern California. The Mach 3 high-altitude jet flew from Los Angeles to Dulles International Airport near Washington in an official time of 68 minutes and 17 seconds. It averaged 2,112.52 m.p.h. on its way to retirement on permanent display at the Smithsonian Institution.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-five years ago this December, government officials acknowledged the existence of a top-secret spy plane so technologically advanced, it could fly to the edge of space and cross the continent in an hour flat. The needle-shaped aircraft was powered by massive jet engines that propelled it at 35 miles a minute. Constructed with imported Russian titanium and painted midnight black, it had a sleek, sinister appearance straight out of science fiction.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-five years ago this December, government officials acknowledged the existence of a top-secret spy plane so technologically advanced, it could fly to the edge of space and cross the continent in an hour flat. The needle-shaped aircraft was powered by massive jet engines that propelled it at 35 miles a minute. Constructed with imported Russian titanium and painted midnight black, it had a sleek, sinister appearance straight out of science fiction.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As 20,000 U.S. troops head to Bosnia on a controversial peacekeeping mission, the Air Force has ignored requests by top U.S. military commanders in Europe to send the SR-71 spy plane to gather intelligence there, according to Air Force and congressional sources. In a bitter bureaucratic and political battle that apparently is leaving a gap in intelligence operations in the field, the Air Force has stalled on requests for intelligence flights by the SR-71.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | From Reuters
The Senate Armed Services Committee approved a $263-billion defense authorization bill Friday, including money that might put the SR-71 spy plane back in operation to watch North Korea's nuclear program. The authorization for next year's defense spending also would keep more bombers than President Clinton wants for fighting two Persian Gulf-type wars at nearly the same time, and hold out the hope of buying more B-2 Stealth bombers. Chairman Sam Nunn (D-Ga.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As 20,000 U.S. troops head to Bosnia on a controversial peacekeeping mission, the Air Force has ignored requests by top U.S. military commanders in Europe to send the SR-71 spy plane to gather intelligence there, according to Air Force and congressional sources. In a bitter bureaucratic and political battle that apparently is leaving a gap in intelligence operations in the field, the Air Force has stalled on requests for intelligence flights by the SR-71.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1995 | PETER ROBERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just a month after work began in Palmdale to refurbish three of the fabled SR-71 Air Force spy planes, the House of Representatives has moved to pull the funding rug out from under the $100-million project. Last week, the House passed a supplemental spending bill that adds $2.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The SR-71 Blackbird, the legendary spy plane that flies faster than a bullet, was ordered out of retirement by Congress last year at a cost of about $62 million, but the plane still isn't doing much spying. Pentagon officials, who bitterly fought against reactivating the 1960s-era Lockheed Martin aircraft, say it uses obsolete technology at a staggering cost of $1 million a photo. And now that Congress has forced it on them, they have not sent it on a single foreign intelligence mission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For more than 25 years, the SR-71 Blackbird carried the eyes in the sky that allowed U.S. military and intelligence agencies to obtain detailed photographs of hot spots around the world. Now the famed spy plane is carrying cameras focused on the universe above instead of the world below. Applying Cold War technology to post-Cold War goals, scientists are beginning to use the SR-71, the fastest and highest-flying production aircraft ever, for peacetime experiments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1994
A large truck losing its cargo overboard as it rounds an overhead freeway bridge is a sight none of us ever want to see. And yet that happened as a truck dropped its load of heavy steel tubes onto the I-5 Freeway just north of San Fernando. It was another of many truck disasters. I don't know what the trucking industry uses for design of truck cargo supports. I do know that standard aircraft design practice for many decades has required that all cargo supports be designed for a turning side load equal to one-half the weight of the cargo.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The SR-71 Blackbird, the legendary spy plane that flies faster than a bullet, was ordered out of retirement by Congress last year at a cost of about $62 million, but the plane still isn't doing much spying. Pentagon officials, who bitterly fought against reactivating the 1960s-era Lockheed Martin aircraft, say it uses obsolete technology at a staggering cost of $1 million a photo. And now that Congress has forced it on them, they have not sent it on a single foreign intelligence mission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1995 | PETER ROBERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just a month after work began in Palmdale to refurbish three of the fabled SR-71 Air Force spy planes, the House of Representatives has moved to pull the funding rug out from under the $100-million project. Last week, the House passed a supplemental spending bill that adds $2.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | From Reuters
The Senate Armed Services Committee approved a $263-billion defense authorization bill Friday, including money that might put the SR-71 spy plane back in operation to watch North Korea's nuclear program. The authorization for next year's defense spending also would keep more bombers than President Clinton wants for fighting two Persian Gulf-type wars at nearly the same time, and hold out the hope of buying more B-2 Stealth bombers. Chairman Sam Nunn (D-Ga.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For more than 25 years, the SR-71 Blackbird carried the eyes in the sky that allowed U.S. military and intelligence agencies to obtain detailed photographs of hot spots around the world. Now the famed spy plane is carrying cameras focused on the universe above instead of the world below. Applying Cold War technology to post-Cold War goals, scientists are beginning to use the SR-71, the fastest and highest-flying production aircraft ever, for peacetime experiments.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The SR-71 Blackbird spy plane roared into history Tuesday with a record-setting cross-country flight and a roof-rattling sonic boom heard across Southern California. The Mach 3 high-altitude jet flew from Los Angeles to Dulles International Airport near Washington in an official time of 68 minutes and 17 seconds. It averaged 2,112.52 m.p.h. on its way to retirement on permanent display at the Smithsonian Institution.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|