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Srebrenica Massacre

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NEWS
May 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The remains of about 4,300 victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre have been exhumed, but only 118 bodies have been identified so far, Red Cross officials said. More than 7,500 Muslim men and youths were reported missing in the massacre by Bosnian Serb forces. The International Committee of the Red Cross presented a second book of photographs of clothes and personal belongings found with the remains.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
New York artist Taryn Simon was a year or two into what became a four-year photography-anthropology project before she realized that the project's blind spots might be the most interesting thing about it. For each "chapter" of "A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I-XVIII," Simon chose a person from a particular ethnic, political or religious group and tried to photograph all of the person's living ancestors and descendants. "I was interested in making a catalog that is already determined, where I have no curating or editing power, where I'm not making the decisions," she said on a recent visit to MOCA's Geffen Contemporary, where the series runs through Jan. 7. PHOTOS: Arts and culture pictures by the Times In this way it resembles her acclaimed 2009 series, made by photographing contraband seized at John F. Kennedy airport - in essence letting customs agents curate the selection of objects from animal parts to counterfeit Viagra.
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WORLD
September 28, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic said mercenaries directed by Bosnia-Herzegovina's Muslim leaders and French spies orchestrated the 1995 Srebrenica massacre in a plot to bring world wrath on the Serbs. "They agreed to have this crime committed--to abandon Srebrenica and to carry out this slaughter," he charged. Milosevic is on trial at The Hague on genocide charges; one count involves Srebrenica, Europe's worst atrocity since World War II.
WORLD
July 5, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
War crimes suspect Ratko Mladic was thrown out of court Monday at The Hague after he shouted in protest and refused to hear the allegations against him. The court entered a not-guilty plea on his behalf to charges that he oversaw unspeakable acts of genocide during the 1992-95 Balkans conflict. "I'm not going to listen anymore. You're talking in vain," a contemptuous Mladic told the International Criminal Court as the presiding judge began reading out the counts against him. As the former Bosnian Serb general pulled off his headphones and continued to hurl abuse, the judge asked security officers to remove him from the courtroom.
WORLD
October 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Forensic experts said they had found the remains of about 60 victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of up to 8,000 Muslims in eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina. Murat Hurtic, a regional forensic team leader, said up to 100 bodies could be in the grave. Hurtic said the victims were among 720 men who fled Srebrenica in July 1995 and were slain by Bosnian Serb forces in the village of Grbavci. The grave, near the town of Zvornik, is where the bodies were moved to cover up the killings, he said.
WORLD
May 27, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Shortly before the slaughter, Gen. Ratko Mladic patted the boys on their heads and offered them candy. He told the adults being herded in the city of Srebrenica that everything would be all right. Within days, Mladic's troops, said to be acting on his orders, had killed about 8,000 of Srebrenica's men and boys, lining them up, opening fire and dumping their bodies in mass graves; many of the women were raped. It was this chilling cynicism that marked Mladic, in the words of a former NATO officer, a world-class war criminal.
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
If Ratko Mladic is extradited on charges of mass murder, as even he now seems to believe is inevitable, his own words may come back to haunt him. Thousands of them. Prosecutors at the war crimes tribunal in The Hague are combing through a trove of diaries and audio recordings kept by the Bosnian Serb general throughout the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Mladic was an obsessive record-keeper, jotting down notes from even the briefest conversations. The habit was evidence, some say, of an outsize personality convinced of its own importance.
WORLD
July 5, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
War crimes suspect Ratko Mladic was thrown out of court Monday at The Hague after he shouted in protest and refused to hear the allegations against him. The court entered a not-guilty plea on his behalf to charges that he oversaw unspeakable acts of genocide during the 1992-95 Balkans conflict. "I'm not going to listen anymore. You're talking in vain," a contemptuous Mladic told the International Criminal Court as the presiding judge began reading out the counts against him. As the former Bosnian Serb general pulled off his headphones and continued to hurl abuse, the judge asked security officers to remove him from the courtroom.
NEWS
April 15, 2000
A Muslim witness told a U.N. war crimes tribunal Friday how two brothers hugged--then shot--each other, rather than be killed by Serbian executioners in the July 1995 Srebrenica massacre. The man, identified as "Witness P," lived through the massacre by pretending to be dead in a field of corpses. His testimony came in the genocide trial of Bosnian Serb Gen. Radislav Krstic, which began last month.
WORLD
May 26, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb general accused of overseeing the worst massacre in Europe since the end of World War II, has been arrested, Serbian authorities said Thursday. Mladic is Europe's most wanted war crimes suspect for his alleged role in the 1995 slaughter of 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys in the enclave of Srebrenica, an atrocity that came to symbolize the brutality of the Balkans conflict. The war crimes tribunal in The Hague wants to try Mladic on charges of genocide.
WORLD
May 30, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of supporters of war crimes suspect Ratko Mladic rallied Sunday to protest the arrest of the man whom they revere as a national hero but whom much of the West considers a mass murderer. Ultranationalists, government foes and rowdy soccer fans gathered in front of the parliament building in downtown Belgrade to wave Serbian flags and denounce Mladic's capture and expected extradition this week to The Hague to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity. As darkness fell, a few clashes broke out as demonstrators threw rocks at riot police, who were deployed in large numbers throughout the city center and around Western embassies.
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
If Ratko Mladic is extradited on charges of mass murder, as even he now seems to believe is inevitable, his own words may come back to haunt him. Thousands of them. Prosecutors at the war crimes tribunal in The Hague are combing through a trove of diaries and audio recordings kept by the Bosnian Serb general throughout the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Mladic was an obsessive record-keeper, jotting down notes from even the briefest conversations. The habit was evidence, some say, of an outsize personality convinced of its own importance.
WORLD
May 27, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Shortly before the slaughter, Gen. Ratko Mladic patted the boys on their heads and offered them candy. He told the adults being herded in the city of Srebrenica that everything would be all right. Within days, Mladic's troops, said to be acting on his orders, had killed about 8,000 of Srebrenica's men and boys, lining them up, opening fire and dumping their bodies in mass graves; many of the women were raped. It was this chilling cynicism that marked Mladic, in the words of a former NATO officer, a world-class war criminal.
WORLD
May 26, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb general accused of overseeing the worst massacre in Europe since the end of World War II, has been arrested, Serbian authorities said Thursday. Mladic is Europe's most wanted war crimes suspect for his alleged role in the 1995 slaughter of 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys in the enclave of Srebrenica, an atrocity that came to symbolize the brutality of the Balkans conflict. The war crimes tribunal in The Hague wants to try Mladic on charges of genocide.
WORLD
March 19, 2010 | By Henry Chu
"Scandalous," declared one. "Way off the mark," fumed another. Top Dutch leaders ditched their usual diplomacy Friday to angrily denounce a retired U.S. general's suggestion that allowing openly gay soldiers to serve in their military was partially to blame for Europe's worst massacre since World War II. The statement was made Thursday by John Sheehan, a retired Marine general, before a Senate hearing on the U.S. military's "don't ask,...
WORLD
July 11, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
In late afternoon, the three women rest on a tattered blanket, tired from chores that are now theirs alone to bear in this village without men. They are survivors of the Srebrenica massacre that began July 11, 1995, when Bosnian Serb troops stormed the U.N.-declared "safe haven" and took away their husbands and fathers, brothers and sons. Over the next eight days in the nearby hills, the Serbs killed as many as 8,000 Muslim men and boys, the worst massacre in Europe since World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
New York artist Taryn Simon was a year or two into what became a four-year photography-anthropology project before she realized that the project's blind spots might be the most interesting thing about it. For each "chapter" of "A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I-XVIII," Simon chose a person from a particular ethnic, political or religious group and tried to photograph all of the person's living ancestors and descendants. "I was interested in making a catalog that is already determined, where I have no curating or editing power, where I'm not making the decisions," she said on a recent visit to MOCA's Geffen Contemporary, where the series runs through Jan. 7. PHOTOS: Arts and culture pictures by the Times In this way it resembles her acclaimed 2009 series, made by photographing contraband seized at John F. Kennedy airport - in essence letting customs agents curate the selection of objects from animal parts to counterfeit Viagra.
WORLD
July 11, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
In late afternoon, the three women rest on a tattered blanket, tired from chores that are now theirs alone to bear in this village without men. They are survivors of the Srebrenica massacre that began July 11, 1995, when Bosnian Serb troops stormed the U.N.-declared "safe haven" and took away their husbands and fathers, brothers and sons. Over the next eight days in the nearby hills, the Serbs killed as many as 8,000 Muslim men and boys, the worst massacre in Europe since World War II.
WORLD
May 13, 2005 | From Associated Press
The first witness in a civil suit filed by two families of victims of the 1995 massacre in Srebrenica, Bosnia-Herzegovina, testified Thursday that Dutch troops protecting the enclave were unprepared for a Serb onslaught and felt "frustrated and powerless" when it came. Asked what the peacekeepers had done to prepare themselves for the Serb attack on the Muslim town, the witness, personnel officer Berend Oosterveen, replied, "We hadn't considered that."
WORLD
October 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Forensic experts said they had found the remains of about 60 victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of up to 8,000 Muslims in eastern Bosnia-Herzegovina. Murat Hurtic, a regional forensic team leader, said up to 100 bodies could be in the grave. Hurtic said the victims were among 720 men who fled Srebrenica in July 1995 and were slain by Bosnian Serb forces in the village of Grbavci. The grave, near the town of Zvornik, is where the bodies were moved to cover up the killings, he said.
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